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  #1  
Old 11-21-2011, 04:45 PM
joepa150 joepa150 is offline
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How to secure safe to concrete floor?

I want to bolt/anchor my safe to the floor. It is sitting on concrete. I have drilled into concrete and brick in the past (previous job) BUT I was using a hammer drill and had access to unlimited amount of drill bits. I never used a regular drill to do this.

I bought some tapcon screws/bolts and a concrete/masonry drill bit. All I want to do is secure it with two bolts (one at the back corner and one on the opposite front corner).

I some advice on another forum but it seemed that many of the answers were not what I wanted to hear. Most of them recommended renting or buying a commercial hammer drill.

Will I be able to do what I want to do with my 18v Ryobi cordless drill?
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  #2  
Old 11-21-2011, 04:57 PM
Joe O Joe O is offline
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I would think so.If your safe is predrilled,just mark it and drill.May take awhile.
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  #3  
Old 11-21-2011, 05:03 PM
Horoscope Fish Horoscope Fish is offline
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I've never been able to drill concrete with anything less than a hammer-drill but what can it hurt to try.
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  #4  
Old 11-21-2011, 05:10 PM
L.E. L.E. is offline
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That will most likely be a big job for a cordless drill, but it doesn't hurt to try. A regular corded 1/2" drill should work fine if you can borrow one. How big are the anchors?
L.
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  #5  
Old 11-21-2011, 05:19 PM
RGC RGC is offline
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Are you trying to bolt it down so someone can't steal it or just to keep it in place ? A couple of tapcons might hold it in place, but not well enough to prevent someone from taking it. When using a non-hammer drill with a masonry bit the bit seems to just heat up long before you get a couple holes drilled.Tapcons also drive much better with a hammer drill.
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  #6  
Old 11-21-2011, 05:36 PM
joepa150 joepa150 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RGC View Post
Are you trying to bolt it down so someone can't steal it or just to keep it in place ? A couple of tapcons might hold it in place, but not well enough to prevent someone from taking it. When using a non-hammer drill with a masonry bit the bit seems to just heat up long before you get a couple holes drilled.Tapcons also drive much better with a hammer drill.
You are probably right but I figured that it would be a pain in the butt for the average thief to rip the safe out. The weight of the safe plus having some tapcon screws I think would be good enough for me.
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  #7  
Old 11-21-2011, 05:37 PM
gnystrom gnystrom is offline
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If there is a wall behind it use that will be enough to secure it.
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  #8  
Old 11-21-2011, 05:58 PM
L.E. L.E. is offline
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Originally Posted by gnystrom View Post
If there is a wall behind it use that will be enough to secure it.
Any remotely serious thief will just cut your wall apart.
L.
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  #9  
Old 11-21-2011, 06:10 PM
JTucker JTucker is offline
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An sds rotary hammer will make short work of concrete for anchors. I've fooled around with hammer drills before and took forever. Buy, borrow or rent one, you'll be glad you did.
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  #10  
Old 11-21-2011, 08:00 PM
dfariswheel dfariswheel is offline
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The most secure method of bolting a safe in the basement is to bolt it to the floor and a concrete wall.
The bolts in the wall prevent rocking the safe to pull the bolts out of the floor or even to pull them out of the safe floor.

The perfect method is to position the safe in a corner and put bolts through the floor and both walls.

Do yourself a favor, rent a hammer drill.
When using it wear ear protection. A lot of construction people used to complain about how tired they were after using loud power equipment in a basement.
Turns out that loud noises can make you physically tired.
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  #11  
Old 11-21-2011, 08:41 PM
L.E. L.E. is offline
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Turns out that loud noises can make you physically tired.

And cause permanent hearing loss.
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  #12  
Old 11-21-2011, 08:52 PM
TMartinLVNV TMartinLVNV is offline
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I didn't have a hammer drill when I was installing my safe. I used my 3/8" air drill (have a 60 gal air compressor). It took a little bit of time and a bit designed for concrete ($10 at home depot). If you are using an electric drill, you are going to need a 1/2" plug in model. I don't see it happening with a cordless. I drilled for a minute, then used a vacuum to suck out the dust, then drilled again. Probably took me less than 30 minutes for 4 bolts.
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  #13  
Old 11-22-2011, 09:13 AM
gnystrom gnystrom is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L.E. View Post
Any remotely serious thief will just cut your wall apart.
L.
Sorry. I live in the northern states. If we have a concrete floor, it is in a basement and there are concrete walls supporting the floors above.
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  #14  
Old 11-22-2011, 09:49 AM
lssuds lssuds is offline
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your ryobi will not get the job done, you need a hammer drill equipped with a carbide tipped drill bit. you do not need a heavy duty, industrial hammer drill but you do need the hammer action to break up the concrete(you don't really drill concrete, it's more like controlled precision chipping.) any 3/8" to 1/2" chuck hammer drill should handle the job easily and can be rented rather cheaply. i personally would just buy one though, you can get a dewalt 3/8" for around $100
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  #15  
Old 11-22-2011, 10:07 AM
steveb4c steveb4c is offline
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i have to mount equipment to concrete, brick, and rock walls almost on a daily basis, trust me your just going to burn up bits with a regular drill. you need a hammer drill to put the size bolts in that will help stop a thief. also like another post said, leave no room to rock the safe, bolt to a wall too.
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  #16  
Old 11-22-2011, 10:30 AM
Tennessee Tennessee is offline
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when drill concrete I use a masonry bit, 1/2 electric drill and cool and flush with water. The water really does make a difference in the cutting action and makes a nice mess. I control with a barrier of towels to keep it contained.
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  #17  
Old 11-22-2011, 10:38 AM
L.E. L.E. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gnystrom View Post
Sorry. I live in the northern states. If we have a concrete floor, it is in a basement and there are concrete walls supporting the floors above.
Sorry, I didn't even consider that. I was thinking of wood frame construction and sheetrock.
L.
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  #18  
Old 11-22-2011, 11:10 AM
BrewNinja BrewNinja is offline
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Maybe you guys dont have enough stuff in your safes ;p I store all my ammo in mine too. The safe weighs 800lbs empty. Not something you can easily rock when bolted to the floor!
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  #19  
Old 11-22-2011, 11:17 AM
SRJim SRJim is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L.E. View Post
That will most likely be a big job for a cordless drill, but it doesn't hurt to try. A regular corded 1/2" drill should work fine if you can borrow one. How big are the anchors?
L.
I agree with this. Cordless just don't have the power to last long enough.

We used to drill for anchoring racks etc. in commercial building floors and just used a new masonry bit and a big a$$ corded 1/2" drill. You may feel it the next day, but it'll work.

I like the idea of flush and cool too, although I've never done it. Should keep some of the dust down as well. Nasty stuff to breath.......
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  #20  
Old 11-22-2011, 09:36 PM
John Doe John Doe is offline
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If it's worth putting two bolts in the floor it's worth putting in four.
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  #21  
Old 11-23-2011, 09:40 AM
rem700 rem700 is offline
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Well you dont indicate location but if your close to Blaine Mn I have a hammer drill you could borrow.
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  #22  
Old 11-23-2011, 10:25 AM
L.E. L.E. is offline
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I was reading this again and noticed something. I wouldn't recommend placing the anchor bolts in the corners of the bottom. They need to be located where they can't be reached (cut) with a Sawzall blade. 12" blades are available everywhere, I'm thinking one big anchor in the middle, similar with the back of the safe. Stay away from the edges, anyway. The exception would be if you think you can bolt it down so securely that it won't be possible the flex it enough with a big bar to slip a blade under it. Any anchor bolts I've seen are not hard to cut through.
Hope this helps,
L.
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  #23  
Old 11-23-2011, 11:27 AM
James Otto James Otto is offline
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Wont cut anchor bolts

I don't know of a piece of equipment that is gonna fit under a safe to cut anchor bolts. As long as they are not flush with a side or front of your safe you are okay.

Unless the safe is elevated, any retaining nut for a angle grinder or sawzall or anything isnt gonna get underneath to cut the bolts.

Just put 1 in the center for good measure.

Drill and either epoxy all thread in or use some red heads.
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  #24  
Old 11-23-2011, 11:54 AM
L.E. L.E. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Otto View Post
I don't know of a piece of equipment that is gonna fit under a safe to cut anchor bolts. As long as they are not flush with a side or front of your safe you are okay.

Unless the safe is elevated, any retaining nut for a angle grinder or sawzall or anything isnt gonna get underneath to cut the bolts.

Just put 1 in the center for good measure.

Drill and either epoxy all thread in or use some red heads.
James, I've probably cut more stuff with a Sawzall than you can imagine. All that's needed is to lift the safe 1/16" with a pry bar, and slip the blade under it. If the bolt is within 8-10", it can be cut. After the first one, the others will be even easier.
L.
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  #25  
Old 11-23-2011, 12:10 PM
James Otto James Otto is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L.E. View Post
James, I've probably cut more stuff with a Sawzall than you can imagine. All that's needed is to lift the safe 1/16" with a pry bar, and slip the blade under it. If the bolt is within 8-10", it can be cut. After the first one, the others will be even easier.
L.
I got to thinking about the sawzall after I wrote that.

My initial thoughts were a metabo or something. I still wouldn't think a sawzall blade would cut at the bent angle it needs to fit under a safe that is securely fastened to the floor.

My safe has NO gap. None, and if the safe is able to have one corner bent up with a prybar, its safe to say the lock can be cut through faster than the floor bolts.
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