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I have been shooting IDPA for almost 2 years. It is very common to shoot a 1 handed COF. I have been told you should always take your weak hand and put it on your chest while shooting. I have heard this is simply so that you do not put both hands on the pistol, I have also been told it improves your 1 handed shooting stance. What is the real reason? Or does it matter?
 

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Originally posted by eljay45:

I have been told you should always take your weak hand and put it on your chest while shooting. What is the real reason? Or does it matter?
According to Rob Leatham, doing so increases your stability because if you have you free arm away from your body, in decreases stability. I always shoot this way (with my free arm across my chest) and it seems to work when shooting strong hand/weak hand only.
 

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It is also a CQB technique that assumes that you are shooting your gun weak handed for a reason ( because your strong hand/arm is incapacitated). Holding your arm across your chest offers some measure of protection to the vital organs - so even if you can't grasp/shoot a gun with that hand, you still may be able to use your weak arm to shield or block with.

Some bullseye shooters place their strong hand in their pocket when shooting weak handed, again for the stability reason that vapors outlined above.
 

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It makes sense to keep the free hand close to the center of mass since any movement by that arm must be balanced by the rest of the body. In the old days it was taught for another reason also, you were taught to clench the fist and hold it over the heart as a shield. Thank God for Bill Davis!
 

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I can't remember which writer it was, but he commented that using your arm as a shield would just result in getting shot in the arm AND the chest. Obviously he forget a few technical details, but it always struck me as funny.

I keep my free hand about waist level so I can grab a magazine faster than someone who has their hand closer to their opposite armpit. I figure that if my right arm is located on my right side, then in order to keep balanced I should keep my left arm on the left side.
 

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Originally posted by Walking Point:
I can't remember which writer it was, but he commented that using your arm as a shield would just result in getting shot in the arm AND the chest
The CQB technique of keeping the arm in this position, is a defensive measure against knives or impact/blunt trauma weapons. In my post above, I did not mean to indicate that the arm was meant to act as a shield against bullets!
 

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As long as the non-shooting hand is isolated, that is the point. The "best" or "preferred" method is considered hand across the chest. I am comfortable with the hand across my belly. I have seen others put their's on their side like a fencer or in their pocket like the traditional bullseye shooter. If the stage allows a free style position, then you should orient yourself differently to the target(s) than if you were shooting two-handed.
 

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I keep my other hand on my chest so I stand as I do using two hands. This will keep my sight picture as close as possible to two handed shooting. If you turn and shoot bullseye style, you may get a different sight picture. This may not matter at 20 yards or less, but why add another variable? Consistency is the key.

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johnnyb
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I've thought about this too (great the chairborne commando is about to speak!).

It might offer ballistic protection, if your opponent were shooting a low power weapon, as crimminals often do, like a .25, or a .32.

To me, sometimes things can just go a little "goofy" under stress, and you end up shooting w/ one hand, when you actually meant to shoot w/ two.

My hand always ends up at my side, like in a karate punch position. For me, the shooting stability is about the same as for across the chest, but the karate punch position seems to put me in a more aggressive shooting posture, and attitude. Too, it is a very natural CQB stance for a person who has had eastern martial arts training.

I've seen some others do the same.

Elsy
 
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