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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
And aside from driving my wife crazy, the trigger on Series I Aluminum SS Compact is nearly perfect! I also gave it a little "boosting" treatment and dropped some FP 10 into the sear/disconnector area. The pull is very smooth with only the slightest bit of roll now and crisp break. I'm happy with it! I thought the mag that came with it was interesting, but after seeing some of the damage it can do, I guess I will trash it and use my Wilson mags. I also have to polish the feed ramp...it looks like there might be a tiny spot of rust there! The aluminum must be prone to that. The gun was really pretty dry when I got it and have worked in some FP 10 so it should do better now.

Now all I have to do is get to the range and see if it shoots OK. XS sights are on order too. Are there any MIM parts on this gun that I should be changing out?

H
 

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You're gonna wear that thing out! A thousand dry-fires BEFORE you shoot it? Don't change anything yet. I'd keep an extra fitted slide stop around. Good luck, you'll love it!
 

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I was talking about your Kimber! :rofl:
 

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bigboyhf said:
I also have to polish the feed ramp...it looks like there might be a tiny spot of rust there! The aluminum must be prone to that. The gun was really pretty dry when I got it and have worked in some FP 10 so it should do better now.
Don't polish the ramp on an aluminum framed gun! Aluminum doesn't rust.......iron rusts. What you are probably seeing is some surface anodizing. If you polish the ramp, you will remove the anodizing and expose the softer aluminum underneath.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Oh...right...I knew that...the Kimber...right! And that goes for the dry fires as well...the Kimber! :eek:

H :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Re: Re: 1000+ dry fires later...

Kruzr said:
Don't polish the ramp on an aluminum framed gun! Aluminum doesn't rust.......iron rusts. What you are probably seeing is some surface anodizing. If you polish the ramp, you will remove the anodizing and expose the softer aluminum underneath.
I thought I saw in another thread that the Aluminum frames are prone to rust ie Oxidation. I have seen Aluminum rust on my barbeque grill. It turns a whitish color. This spot though is orange. I will try to take a picture of it and post it. If I can't polish it out, how should I remove it?

H
 

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Aluminum oxidizes to Aluminum Oxide...........the white build up you see. Try some Flitz polish by hand. I wouldn't use anything too abrasive. Its common for the ramp to get some surface anodizing when they do the frame. If its smooth and feeds fine, don't worry about it.
 

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bigboyhf

From looking at the images you have posted, that just might be rust (i.e. iron oxide), since it looks like there is a raised spot in the center of it. If this really is rust it is most likely a small piece of steel that got caught on the frame somewhere in manufacturing and never got cleaned off. This spot might be a piece of blasting material from when the frame got sand blasted, and the imbedded grit is contaminated with iron oxide.

My first suggestion is to field strip your pistol and see if you can push the spot off with your finger nail. Next try a patch and Hoppes #9 (yellow lable) to see if that will rub it off. Hoppes will stop rust. If this fails, the next thing I would try is try to scrub it off using Hoppes #9 and a tooth brush. If scrubbing with a tooth brush fails you might try pushing is off using the tooth brush handle or a 3/8 inch diameter wooden dowel. If this fails you might just want to shoot your pistol to see if this gets knocked free.

I am hesitant to recommend polishing this spot, as it is easy to remove too much material and then you have removed the anodizing seal and may have exposed bare aluminum. The fact that this spot has developed give me the impression that you may have airborne moisture issues, or condensation, on the pistol, which will mean that exposing the bare aluminum will not be a good idea either.

So try the cleaning methods first, then see if anything more is needed.

Str8_Shot
 

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So as time goes on and more rds wear the feed ramp, is there a method to touch up that area's finish without having to have the whole frame re finished?

Thanks,
Wes
 

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If it does wear down, there are steel inserts that can be welded to the frame. FWIW, I'm at 6000 rounds on my Pro CDP and the ramp doesn't show any wear. The same anodizing that was on it when I got it is still there.
 

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Ok, so say you scratch your frame, there has to be some product out there for touching the stuff up doesn't there?

Wes
 

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I thought of sharpie markers as well, but I wasn't sure how it would hold up to solvents, or for that matter, how well it would protect the metal.

Wes
 

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As for what MIM parts to replace, my firing pin stop cracked around 4k rounds. I first replaced it with an Ed Brown, but that one was too small and allowed the extractor to rotate. Finally bought a Caspian, it was so tight I had to file it down to fit. It's perfect now :) The firing pin stop cracking was due more to the design than MIM though. The Caspian one has a lot more metal around the hole (no needless cutouts like the Kimber's had) and has a nice radiused corner in the cutout (instead of the 90 degree corner where my crack started)

~8k rounds I noticed my previously sweet trigger starting to get heavier (from 2lbs to nearly 4.5). I found out the MIM sear was dented from the hammer hooks. Bought a Wilson tool steel sear, dropped it in and the trigger pull dropped right back down to 2lbs :)

The MIM extractor loses tension every few thousand rounds but has never caused a functioning problem. If I notice it's loose I just retension it during routine cleaning.
 

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More than likely, if you avoid using the Kimber, Chip McCormick, or magazines with similar followers, to avoid the damage they can cause, one of the first wear marks in the frame will be a red, or copper colored streak in the feed ramp from where bullet jackets are being rubbed. This happens because aluminum oxide, including anodize, is a very hard material and makes a great abrasive. Almost all sand paper uses aluminum oxide for the abrasive material. When this happens the key is to keep this surface clean, and oiled, but do not try to remove the discoloration by polishing. This discoloration usually does not penetrate the anodize layer, but polishing certainly will.

Kruzer is partially correct concering how feed ramp damage can be repaired. If the feed ramp gets gouged, or becomes severly pitted, there are basically two things that can be done. One is to machine the frame to remove the feed ramp completely so a ramped barrel can be installed. The second is to partially remove the feed ramp and replace it with a steel insert. In either case the frame will need to be re-finshed. Though with the 7075 aluminum frame there is one difference from a steel frame. In a steel frame the insert can be welded in. Also, in a steel frame minor damage can be welded and remachined. The difference in a 7075 aluminum frame is, this type of aluminum cannot be welded. In this case an insert would have to be glued in place.
 

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More than likely, if you avoid using the Kimber, Chip McCormick, or magazines with similar followers, to avoid the damage they can cause, one of the first wear marks in the frame will be a red, or copper colored streak in the feed ramp from where bullet jackets are being rubbed. This happens because aluminum oxide, including anodize, is a very hard material and makes a great abrasive. Almost all sand paper uses aluminum oxide for the abrasive material. When this happens the key is to keep this surface clean, and oiled, but do not try to remove the discoloration by polishing. This discoloration usually does not penetrate the anodize layer, but polishing certainly will.

Kruzer is partially correct concering how feed ramp damage can be repaired. If the feed ramp gets gouged, or becomes severly pitted, there are basically two things that can be done. One is to machine the frame to remove the feed ramp completely so a ramped barrel can be installed. The second is to partially remove the feed ramp and replace it with a steel insert. In either case the frame will need to be re-finshed. Though with the 7075 aluminum frame there is one difference from a steel frame. In a steel frame the insert can be welded in. Also, in a steel frame minor damage can be welded and remachined. The difference in a 7075 aluminum frame is, this type of aluminum cannot be welded. In this case an insert would have to be glued in place.
 

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wow
if you think a gun will wear out after 1,000 rounds. you need to get another firearm.
I have a Valtro with atleast 7,000 dry fires. Orginal everything on it.
My les Baer's have atleat 2,000 and kimber - 1,000.
Zero issues.
 

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Hansgraf said:

The MIM extractor loses tension every few thousand rounds but has never caused a functioning problem. If I notice it's loose I just retension it during routine cleaning.
Kimber doesn't use MIM extractors. But I agree, they DO seem to need adjustment more than they should.

Take a good look at it the next time you have it out. You will likely see horizontal machine marks in the long flats and chatter marks at the rounded parts leading to the fulcrum and the hook. If they were MIM, you wouldn't see any machining.
 
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