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Sorry if I missed this, but what powder and charge weight, and your OAL?

Grumpy
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Seat/crimp works ok for bullets with cannelure or crimping grove as they are more forgiving but if your brass isn't exactly the same length and it starts crimping too soon you get bulges around the neck.
Brass is different lengths and headstamps. Berry’s 180gr plated bullets

Is your brass all one headstamp? Is it possible some of your brass is bulged and it has only been by chance that you've loaded bulged cases with powder?
If a dedicated crimp die is on the table, I really like the Redding crimp dies. Seating and crimping in one step is not unreasonable to do, but it is easy to have something go wrong. I do this regularly with revolver load and cast bullets that have a large crimp groove.
Also, take the dummy cartridge that wont chamber and coat it with ink from a sharpie marker. Drop it back into the chamber and try to rotate it. This will reveal the contact areas.
Different headtstamps. Just happened to get this 10mm during the current shortage. Can’t find brass so it’s all from mixed bag ammo.

@Bluedsteel45 If I understand correctly the only difference between the rounds that plunk and the rounds that don't is powder? Try a little less powder maybe. I agree with seating and crimping in separate operations, and I second using Lee FCD, but that doesn't sound like your problem (Yet). For sure 10mm needs taper crimp.
I’ve tried with 2 different minimum loads- AA#9 and Power Pistol. It’s my understanding you can get overpressure going less than that. Reading around other forums on this die set that a taper crimp can be done with this die set but really finicky, hence why they came out with the newer set that is named taper crimp. Why they made a die set for a semi autos cartridge without making it taper crimp blows my mind.

Something up with that powder charge. Could be too much of a low density powder mistaken for another powder/charge weight. Hairy things can happen when a pistol goes boom.
I’ve tried power pistol and AA#9 in brand new cans. I’ve been getting consistent throws.
 

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You’re on top of that. Takes that variable of the equation. Cudos…stay safe,
 
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Brass is different lengths and headstamps. Berry’s 180gr plated bullets


Different headtstamps. Just happened to get this 10mm during the current shortage. Can’t find brass so it’s all from mixed bag ammo.
What I suspect is happening is your scraping off bullet/plating as your seating and crimping creating a small ring of material that builds up in the die. This affects the quality of the finished product from bulged brass to excessive crimps to OAL variations. I've seen it before and it's a common frustration for new reloaders.

A pro USPSA shooter told me how he sets up his dies 30 years ago, I've been doing it the same way ever since.
After sizing all your brass, set one empty sized case aside. (I'll explain later)
Set up your expander die so you can just start about 1/16" of the base of the bullet in the case. It should stand proud and not go in any further even with finger pressure. Remove bullet, pull expander die.
Take expanded case and raise the ram. Screw down your seater/crimp die on the expanded case till you feel resistance and lock it.
Add primer/powder and seat your bullets. (My 10's seem to like an OAL of 1.250 with most bullets)
Now unlock your seater/crimp die and raise the seating stem a bit. Remember that empty sized case? Measure the case mouth with your calipers. (should be around .422-.423) Put the case in the shell holder and raise the ram again. Screw the die down till you hit resistance. Pull the case back out and measure the mouth again. You want this measurement to be no more than .001 smaller. That's your taper crimp. Now run your loads through the crimp die and chamber check them.

Hope this helps.

Jeff

PS. Your dies are traditional Seat/taper crimp. The new taper crimp dies have a separate adjustment stem and appear rather complicated to me. I have been seating and crimping separately for going on 40 years and just use crimp only dies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
I posted my problem here and on Rugerforum and between the two groups I think we got a good lead on figuring it out. I’m using a mixed bag of brass because I just picked up my 10mm during this shortage and I can’t find brass only loaded ammo. I got different lengths of brass and with the one step process some come out good while others’ have longer casings and end up bulged. From what I understand from everyone is that if I separate the sequences I’ll get my consistent seating depth and then my crimp. Which makes sense why I have been able to produce quality ammo in 45 with my Lee dies but now ran into trouble. I’ll get a taper die and get back to you guys.
 

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My Hornady .40/10 die set applies a roll crimp (which I find bizarre), so I bought a taper crimp die.
 

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This is spot on (POST 26 )and exactly how I have done it for yrs. with no problems.
 

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Seating and crimping in the same step is just asking for trouble. Easy for me to say as I have a Dillon that breaks up the steps but that is why I have a Dillon. I learned the hard way that seating and crimping in the same step is a mess.
 

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While I agree with most of the reloading guidance posted here (especially having separate seating and crimping dies - I like Dillon carbide 3-die sets personally, but Redding and RCBS are good too), what I keep coming back to is the fact that you ONLY have this issue after dropping powder. If you load a dummy round using every step EXCEPT for the powder drop, it sounds like you don't have any problems. In my mind, this removes most questions around the setup of your dies as a direct culprit for this issue.

I believe you also said you're loading minimum loads, so I'm also assuming that there's no way you have so much powder in the case that you're somehow bulging the case when seating the bullet (and unless your powder had the consistency and density of sand, I would think you'd have a hard time doing it even with a too-full case).

Ordinarily, I would suspect needing more taper crimp, but I keep getting stuck on the only difference being whether there is powder in the case or not. Question - I'm assuming that you're still belling your cases even if you're not dropping powder for the dummies?
 
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