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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all

I acquired one of the recent issue 1911 A1s through CMP (1943 Rem. Rand, US Army issue). As we all are very much aware, these firearms have great historical significance.

I am wondering, is there a way, using the serial #, to trace its history? To whom it was issued and what rank? What places it has been?

If anyone knows of a source then that information would be very much appreciated.

Thank you!

John C G
 

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There have been threads on this topic here on 1911forum. The U.S.G.I. subforum is the place to ask and to look:


If you need more help, P.M. me; pretty adept at the search feature by now.

HtH
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There have been threads on this topic here on 1911forum. The U.S.G.I. subforum is the place to ask and to look:


If you need more help, P.M. me; pretty adept at the search feature by now.

HtH
I will give it a try, thank you so much!

John C G
 

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With US military firearms you can often find out where they were originally shipped after leaving the factory, but the trail nearly always goes cold after you get to Springfield Armory or whatever military base or arsenal where they went. If there were any records tying them to a particular serviceman they're probably buried in a large government warehouse somewhere...

 
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I will give it a try, thank you so much!

John C G
With US military firearms you can often find out where they were originally shipped after leaving the factory, but the trail nearly always goes cold after you get to Springfield Armory or whatever military base or arsenal where they went. If there were any records tying them to a particular serviceman they're probably buried in a large government warehouse somewhere...
While ‘dsk’ is giving a realistic view of the rule, here’s a couple exceptions:

USS Texas BB-35 M1911 Inventory Totals & misc. USS...

Another CMP 1937 Colt from USS North Carolina BB-55: S/n...

These found from remembering the gist of some threads being U.S. Navy records of ship inventories that included serial numbers. So I used a search term:

+navy +ship

Scrounging through the results, I recognized this thread:

WWII USN Destroyer small arms allocation: Fletcher and...

... but was dismayed the ship’s inventory had no serial numbers. So tried a search restricted to ‘shooter5’, the thread’s O.P.’er and found the two threads linked further above.

Other searches I’d try if serious would be for:

+contract +range

... to look for posts mentioning serial number ranges listed in specific contracts. A few such threads even recently over pistols in Canada.

Odds definitely stacked against finding any history on that specific pistol. For that, your odds are better from tracing the pistol itself back. But the two are not mutually exclusive. And searching the inter webs for the serial number, you may find the disposition of pistols from its serial number range. It depends upon how serious you are/become ... it could become a hobby of its own.

Clearly what you find here on the forum (if anything, and odds against) would be just the start of your search. If you end up in that warehouse from post #5, be careful what crates you pry open ... the one containing a big gold case topped with cherubim:

Don't look, [ John ]! Keep your eyes SHUT!

;- }


P.S. not including “serial number” in my search terms was deliberate (I’m not searching seriously [ yet ]): “serial number” gets spelled so many different ways, I wasn’t up for such frustration, e.g.: ser. no.; s/n; ser #; etc. Worse than you’d imagine unless you’re a fan of H.P. Lovecraft. If you’re serious, you’ll end up needing to try ‘em all.
 
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