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Discussion Starter #1
I just got my first 1911. It's a Kimber Combat Carry.
On my Glocks, HK, etc, when the slide is locked back, I just push down the slide release lever and it goes forward. It seems with this 1911 that I have to use my other hand to pull the slide back (when locked it can be pulled back about another 1/8" ), then push the slide lever down and let go of the slide. This seems kind of silly to me. Is that just the way it's made? You have to use BOTH hands to release the slide???

Also, what is the safest way to let the hammer down when there is a live round in the chamber? It seems that I have to use too hands for this also, since apparently I have to pull the triger and keep my hand on the grip safety. Sorry to sound dumb, but this just seems kind of goofy to me.
 

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Nyper said:
I just got my first 1911. It's a Kimber Combat Carry.
On my Glocks, HK, etc, when the slide is locked back, I just push down the slide release lever and it goes forward. It seems with this 1911 that I have to use my other hand to pull the slide back (when locked it can be pulled back about another 1/8" ), then push the slide lever down and let go of the slide. This seems kind of silly to me. Is that just the way it's made? You have to use BOTH hands to release the slide???
If you pull the slide back with a loaded magazine or no magazine, the slide stop should just drop down. It does take a bit more push to drop the slide stop that it does on my USP or my old glock.

Nyper said:
Also, what is the safest way to let the hammer down when there is a live round in the chamber? It seems that I have to use too hands for this also, since apparently I have to pull the triger and keep my hand on the grip safety. Sorry to sound dumb, but this just seems kind of goofy to me.
Not to sound like a jerk, but the best way to do this is not to do it.

The 1911 is not designed to be carried with the hammer down on a live round. Unless I am mistaken, your Kimber is a series I like my Kimber is. There is no firing pin safety in the Series I guns. If you drop the gun with the hammer down on a live round, you run the risk of an accidental (negligent) discharge.

I am sure one of the more experienced 1911 owners will chime in if I am wrong, but I have been told that having the hammer down over a live round is a major no-no.

Matt
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I haven't tried racking the slide with a full magazine or no magazine. I litterally JUST got the gun. Going to the range after work today.

I do plan to carry cocked and locked. I guess there really is no reason to have to let the hammer down on a live round. Makes tons more sense to simply drop the mag and eject the round.

Are there any benefits of not having a firing pin safety?
 

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Nyper said:
I haven't tried racking the slide with a full magazine or no magazine. I litterally JUST got the gun. Going to the range after work today.

I do plan to carry cocked and locked. I guess there really is no reason to have to let the hammer down on a live round. Makes tons more sense to simply drop the mag and eject the round.

Are there any benefits of not having a firing pin safety?
Some folks in the Kimber forum have had problems with the firing pin safety hanging up. Sometimes, simple is better proivided the operator has the proper training.

Enjoy the Kimber. I just finished the second break-in session on my Warrior this morning. Make sure you clean and lube your pistol before you shoot it the first time, following the directions in the manual.

Matt
 

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Kimbers have a longer than normal slide stop notch, for some reason. At the same time the tab on the slide stop is shorter than a Colt unit. None of the Kimbers I owned would easily release the slide by pulling it back.

I also strongly counsel against trying to lower the hammer over a live round. The first time your thumb slips and you hear a deafening noise you'll know why. BTW a Kimber will likely fire whether it has a firing pin safety or not, since you can't pull the trigger to lower the hammer without depressing the grip safety, which releases the FP safety as well.
 

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Yeah, you shouldn't have to both retract the slide AND push down on the slide stop; it should be one or the other. That said, I'd use the two-hand method anyway; no reason to let the slide crash home on an empty chamber.
 

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At the range

With the slide locked back, load a full magazine. Will the slide lock lever release, allowing the slide to drive the first round into the chamber?

If you can't disengage the slide lock lever, something may need to be fixed.

There is divided opinion as to which method of chamber loading is best, using the slide lock lever or pulling back on the slide itself. This is a division of opinion on tactical considerations, not pistol mechanics.

Another thought, the Combat Carry is supposed to have a strong (22#) recoil spring. If the one in your new gun is new and still stiff, it would be putting more pressure on the slide lock lever than a typical 5" barrel government model (that has a a 16-18# spring).

I have a Combat Carry and it does take a little more push to throw the slide forward from lock position.
 

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if you have an empty magazine in it with the slide locked back, its very hard to release the slide, if you have Rd's in the mag it should release very easy, with an empty mag and the slide back just release the mag and the slide should go foward.......scowall
 
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