1911Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Was talking to a guy I work with yesterday about 1911's. He is an ex Army Captain. He told me that 1911's have some sort of mechanism in them that will not allow them to fire if the muzzle is "up against something".

I found this fascinating, as I have never seen this mentioned by the experten around here at all. I thought maybe this was part of what the disconnector does.

Is he full of blue mud? This seems like one of those "the M16 makes it's bullets tumble" kind of things to me, but what do I know?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14,948 Posts
It's called a disconnector, and it will not allow the gun to fire if it is out of battery.

Simply placing the muzzle against something will not stop it from firing, the slide must actually be pushed back 1/8" or so for the disconnector to do its thing.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,645 Posts
... and don't forget that a worn/damaged disconnector can fail to prevent firing out of battery. Uncommon, but I have seen 3 bad enough to fail a safety check. One worn GI gun in my arms room and 2 that a "smith" had "worked on."
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,062 Posts
Bbbbbilll,
Excellent point about worn disconnectors.
I surmise many of the reports of case failures, 'blowouts' if you will, are due to a partially chambered round being fired without the slide in full battery.
As well as thumb and grip safeties, we need to check disconnector function on every gun that passes our bench.
Unload the gun, cock the hammer, move the slide to the rear approximately 1/8" or to a point just shy of where the barrel starts to move downwards, and try the trigger. If the hammer will fall, the pistol needs immediate attention.
Chuck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,395 Posts
Shane45's point here is valid and should be repeated. Just remember, that before you try any kung fu moves, the one in the chamber will fire, possibly leaving a very nasty hole in your hand at best.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top