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The 1911A1 I received from CMP has absolutely no markings on the slide. In almost 60 years of playing with military 1911s (including 21 USMC) I haven’t seen a slide without a manufacturers’ name on it. Nor is there any other etching/stamping on it. CMP says it is a Remington Rand slide. The frame is Ithaca. And is not unusual for an Army frame. Is this common for a Remington Rand slide?
 

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WW2-era slides had the manufacturer's name on them. Post-war slides usually just had the military drawing number on them, 7790314. It's entirely possible that some slides were sourced with no numbers or markings on them or else they were removed during refinishing.
 

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If some gunshow huckster had that pistol , it would be a 'sterile' slide , made during the 60's for the CIA and used for clandestine operatons behind enemy lines.
 

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I think it would be of common interest to see some close ups of it.
 

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Covert: FWIW - my last issued 1911 for Operation INHERENT RESOLVE a few years back had a recent mfg slide without any marks/stamps/CAGE codes. I do not know anything else about them beyond that a few dozen of them were installed on a number of pistols circa 2011 to 2013-ish; those 1911s which, for the most part, previously had WWII era mfg slides on them. Those older slides had been on these pistols for the duration of all of the Operation IRAQI FREEDOM rotations - sometime after Operation NEW DAWN, quite a few had their old 1940s slides replaced with a variety of new, recent mfg slides. Many had the common "CAGE" codes stamped on them. Mine - as mentioned above, in particular, was not marked in any way, but there were only a few which had that type of blank slides. About the only noteworthy items on such slides were they seem to have a very 'hard' finish (scratch and rust resistant) and they had lowered & flared ejection ports. (I would add that prior to my OIR deployment, all of the company's small arms were inspected for serviceability as per unit SOP (this was also conducted post-deployment). I recall the Company armorer and a higher echelon maintenance armorer specifically tore down to the bare frame/slide one of our few WWI era 1911s (the one in the 400,000 Serial number range; but not the 600,000) to gauge, inspect, and Magnu-flux/particle test it. That pistol passed all tests and they put it back together & it went out the door as is without a new slide. Mine (S/n 1769423) had already had its new slide installed by the time I saw it & had it issued to me. Although not privy to the details of why all this slide replacement was being done, I put 2+2 together and conjectured there might be some concern about the viability of the WWII era 'soft' slides and since alot of these old 1940s slides had recently been replaced, maybe there was a connection to several cracked slides (around the ejection port) of WWII slides which had occurred a few years prior during the OIF years. (I personally saw and recorded one of them which has been posted here before). Of the two 1911s which were sent for repair, there were also two M9s which had cracked frames or slides but I cant remember which or if it was both. The bottom line was alot of WWII slides had been replaced with modern mfg. I tallied up the type of slides on the 1911s in my unit and determined 50% had a modern slide installed on them).
 

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shooter5,

It's quite interesting the newly replaced slide kept the tiny USGI sights, not more modern taller front/rear sights.
 

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WW1-era slides typically had a lifespan of only about 6,000 rounds. WW2-slides with their spot-hardened front ends and slide stop notches usually lasted about twice as long. The ejection port and slide lug areas were not heat treated until after WW2 with the introduction of "hard slides". A modern fully-hardened slide is easily good for tens of thousands of rounds.

The frames are usually quite durable and will last tens of thousands of rounds as well, which is why it is so common to see a post-Vietnam era .45 with a new replacement slide.
 

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shooter5,

It's quite interesting the newly replaced slide kept the tiny USGI sights, not more modern taller front/rear sights.
Yes, it is strange because those ancient sights are difficult to use for CQB, although they are great for target shooting! Its probably a typical govt contract Line Drawing blueprint requirement that was from 100 years ago and when new mfg engineers are setting up their CNC program, its so set in stone now, it cannot ever be changed :biglaugh:
About half the guys installed modern sights (I did on my other two 1911s for OIF deployments but I didnt bother changing out the OIR issue because I hardly ever carried it; when I did it was mostly for sentimental reasons to be honest about it :rock:) but for the guys that didn't, I always thought that was quite odd how they were able to tolerate the tiny antique sights since they used modern sights on their Glocks or M9s...:scratch:
Since the old slides werent fully treated, that makes perfect sense why they seem to have worn out and/or been replaced!
 

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