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Get a gunsmith to polish the frame feed ramp and barrel ramp. This cannot harm anything and HPs will feed better. Of course, you could do all those other things too for maximum effect.
 

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Are you talking about an actual problem you're having or more of a general question?

Generally speaking, it's because there's an incompatibility between the ramp/throat area and the bullet. Rounded bullets will generally feed better than tapered bullets. My Gold Cup doesn't like Hydrashocks, which are more tapered, but the more rounded HST runs fine. The ramp/throat area may need to be polished or reshaped to feed a wider variety of bullets. The feed angle from the magazine can be an issue, too. I haven't had any issues with my Colt factory 7-round mags with Metalform followers.

It was common practice in the 80s and 90s to have gunsmiths do a "reliability package" on 1911s, and usually involved polishing and recontouring the ramp/throat area, tune the extractor for proper tension, and sometimes other things, like polishing the breechface. It's still a popular option and almost always part of a package build.

Most modern 1911s should be able to feed hollowpoints out of the box.

Terry Tussey was mentioned. I met him at a gun show back in the 90s when he was still based in CA. Nice man. He pointed out features of his pistols and answered questions from a newb like me. Pretty much everywhere metal moved against metal in his guns was polished. Even the striking surface of the hammer. He hand-cycled a mag full of empty brass through his gun. I got to shoot one of his guns during a course when the instructor let me try his personal Tussey-built gun. Very smooth and easy shooting. RIP.
 

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The pistol was designed to be used with one round - military ball. Browning and the U.S. Army Ordnance Board did not care if it wouldn't feed anything but that round because their extensive tests had shown that the the ball round worked just fine for killing things and feed reliability was at the top of their list. Those are at the top of my list also. Many 1911s will choke on hollow points unless some modifications are made because most of those rounds are shorter.
 

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Generally speaking, it's because there's an incompatibility between the ramp/throat area and the bullet.
And the magazine. All mine feed ball fine, but some have problems with HP or WC. Raising the height if the CMC Shooting Stars in the pistol makes them feed better. They have WC feed lips. Changing to Check Mates with hybrid lips works regardless of the height. The design seems to be pretty fault tolerant if ball is in use, but change one thing and you may have to change something else to compensate.
 

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THIS ^^^^^ Absolutely agree with this . I’m not sure why , but some 1911’s can be magazine sensitive and also H P ammo sensitive. I have a Colt Defender that doesn’t like Speer Gold Dot ammo but runs REMINGTON Golden Saber and Federal HST just fine ...
So experiment with different magazines and H P ammo before going to a gunsmith..
My Defender ALSO hates Gold Dots. I feed it Hornady Critical Defense. I've not done as much reading as others, but I intuitively moved to the Critical Defense because my Defender did just fine with jacketed ball ammo and the Hornady ammo is the closest hollow point that resembled and behaved like ball.
 

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I feed it Hornady Critical Defense. I've not done as much reading as others, but I intuitively moved to the Critical Defense because my Defender did just fine with jacketed ball ammo and the Hornady ammo is the closest hollow point that resembled and behaved like ball.
Just a data point from the Wilson Combat FAQ page Handgun FAQ - Wilson Combat

We do not recommend Critical Defense/Duty ammunition or other ammunition with a soft polymer tip.
 

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The pistol was designed to be used with one round - military ball. Browning and the U.S. Army Ordnance Board did not care if it wouldn't feed anything but that round because their extensive tests had shown that the the ball round worked just fine for killing things and feed reliability was at the top of their list.
The .45ACP round was developed in 1905. 230gr ball was the only round available at the time, although the Army did experiment with 200gr ball loads. Oddball bullet shapes in this caliber didn't come along until decades later.
 

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I've read that the ACP cartridge was designed to duplicate the .45 S&W (Schofield) load, a 230 @ 800, but Browning had wanted to use a 200gr. RN. Dunno if that was true or not, there's an awful lot of balderdash floating around about the early ammo.
 

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My books agree that JB wanted a 200 grainer. The Ordnance guys wanted a heavier slug. I would loved to have seen Browning's face when they told him they wanted more than 200 gains.
 

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My books agree that JB wanted a 200 grainer. The Ordnance guys wanted a heavier slug. I would loved to have seen Browning's face when they told him they wanted more than 200 gains.
If he was as smart as we think he was, he probably thought “longer is better than shorter”.
 

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Just a data point from the Wilson Combat FAQ page Handgun FAQ - Wilson Combat
That's interesting. I hadn't read that. Academically, I wonder why they don't recommend it. Is that recommendation just for their guns or all subcompact 1911's? They don't give an immediate reason for that recommendation. Is it something with the polymer itself, the feeding, or the performance? Anybody have more information?
 

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That's interesting. I hadn't read that. Academically, I wonder why they don't recommend it. Is that recommendation just for their guns or all subcompact 1911's? They don't give an immediate reason for that recommendation. Is it something with the polymer itself, the feeding, or the performance? Anybody have more information?
Although it is a little dated (their recommendation), it had to do with the polymer tips grabbing on the feed ramp and occasionally causing feed malfunctions. It is possible that Hornady has changed the composition of the polymer tip since then, but early on they were causing an occasional malfunction. If you gun works reliably with them, it shouldn't be a problem to use them. As a side note, the Critical Duty is always loaded with flash-suppressed powder, while Critical Defense may or may not be on any given box. This is only important in a low light shoot scenario.
 
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That's interesting. I hadn't read that. Academically, I wonder why they don't recommend it.
... it had to do with the polymer tips grabbing on the feed ramp and occasionally causing feed malfunctions. It is possible that Hornady has changed the composition of the polymer tip since then, ... If you gun works reliably with them, it shouldn't be a problem to use them.
That's right.

I make no claim one way or the other, I've never used them. I'm just providing information. Folks can choose what works for them.
 

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Although it is a little dated (their recommendation), it had to do with the polymer tips grabbing on the feed ramp and occasionally causing feed malfunctions. It is possible that Hornady has changed the composition of the polymer tip since then, but early on they were causing an occasional malfunction. If you gun works reliably with them, it shouldn't be a problem to use them. As a side note, the Critical Duty is always loaded with flash-suppressed powder, while Critical Defense may or may not be on any given box. This is only important in a low light shoot scenario.
My .45s and 9MMs would bobble on the Hornady Critical Defense as well sometimes because the polymer tip was sticky. This was about 2-3 years ago, before I moved to HSTs. The fix for me was to use a sharp knife to cut off the tip of the polymer insert, making the bullet flat. This way, the copper jacket hit the feed ramp first instead of the polymer tip. That cured the problem 100%.
 

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Just a data point from the Wilson Combat FAQ page Handgun FAQ - Wilson Combat
That Wilson statement about 'Critical Defense' was apparently made in error. 'HCD' has a polymer filler inside the hollow point which cannot contact the feed ramp or any part of the barrel. In fact, the bullet has a longer pointed shape that should feed better or at least as well as standard FMJ.
 

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That Wilson statement about 'Critical Defense' was apparently made in error. 'HCD' has a polymer filler inside the hollow point which cannot contact the feed ramp or any part of the barrel. In fact, the bullet has a longer pointed shape that should feed better or at least as well as standard FMJ.
The portion of you post that I highlighted is not accurate. The polymer tip most certainly contacts the feed ramp. That will cause hanging up because of the stickiness of the polymer, which is almost a rubber. If it were truly a hard plastic tip, that wouldn't be the case because the plastic would be more slippery. If Hornady has change the fundamental construction of the tip in the past couple of year, then my information is old based on ammo I bought and used 3-4 years ago.
 

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Remove the slide and load a loaded mag of the round that won't chamber. With your finger, try to push a round into the chamber and see where the hang up is. On a couple of new pistols, I noticed a sharp transition between the feed ramp and chamber. I used a little fine grit automotive sandpaper to remove the sharp edge and create a nice smooth transition. I also tend to polish feed ramps on new pistols, and sometimes the upper portion of the chamber where the nose of the bullet might be prone to contact the chamber as it is entering. This all is made much easier with a Dremel with a polishing bob and some jeweler's rouge to make all the above mentioned surfaces mirror smooth.
 

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That Wilson statement about 'Critical Defense' was apparently made in error. 'HCD' has a polymer filler inside the hollow point which cannot contact the feed ramp or any part of the barrel. In fact, the bullet has a longer pointed shape that should feed better or at least as well as standard FMJ.
The portion of you post that I highlighted is not accurate. The polymer tip most certainly contacts the feed ramp. That will cause hanging up because of the stickiness of the polymer, which is almost a rubber. If it were truly a hard plastic tip, that wouldn't be the case because the plastic would be more slippery. If Hornady has change the fundamental construction of the tip in the past couple of year, then my information is old based on ammo I bought and used 3-4 years ago.
The 'Critical Defense' rounds in my B.U.G. have a polymer tip that could never hit a feed-ramp. But photos available in a web-search show at least three tip designs. Some like the ones in my hand as I type; others that just barely protrude beyond the mouth of the hollow - might manage to touch a feed-ramp; yet others, cones based at the hollow that could easily hit a feed-ramp.
 
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