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Discussion Starter #1
My favorite sporter is the 1917 Enfield that someone made up as their hunting rifle. I buy them fairly cheap and re-work them.
I have two Remingtons- one a Eddystone and the other a Regular Remington. One has clock-wise rifling and the other has counter clock-wise rifling. Anyone have any information why? Thanks!:scratch:
 

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The right hand twist were WW2 replacement barrels.

When WW2 came along the M17 was pressed into service again and re were a big shortage of parts, especially barrels. The original had a 5 groove LH twist Bbl. High Standard Manafacturing Co of New Haven, Conn produced 61,250 x 4 groove bbls with a RH twist and Johnson Automatics Inc of Providence, Rhode Is., produced 81,571 x 2 groove Bbls with a RH twist also. These figures are quoted fron Ian Skennerton's book, 'The US Enfield.'

These rifles were once available in abundance, but are getting rarer. Please don't chop up complete rifles, unless they are junkers. It will be worth a lot more in a few years if you keep it standard and you will be able to swap it easily. What are especially sought after are complete stocks, especially the sheet metal ring between the Bbla and reciever.

If you want to make a sporter, you should be able to get a sporterised stock in a swap on one of these sights.

I have an ex dutch Navy P14, a Remington M17, both as issued and an M17 Eddystone which has been made into a 7.62 range rifle. I am reinstalling a mag well, etc and I will be using it for a accurised mil service rifle. I also have a Eddy action with the ears ground off and a Canjar trigger installed. I don't know where that one is going to end up. I have been thinking of getting a 308 Bbl, chambering the 300H&H, shooting to see how accurate it is, then rechambering to 300Win mag and compare results. I think this is the only way to get a true comparison.

Put that saw away boy!

Cheers, ****.
 

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My .02 cents,
I've got an Eddystone that was actually made in 1917 (there's an online manufacturing date calculator that you input your serial number in and it tells you the date it was made). Its a grand old rifle, and with some Danish match ammo it actually held sub -moa at 100 yards until it started heating up. I agree with ****-don't carve up at that rifle! Around here springfield 03's and 03a3's are much more common. Lately I've seen ridiculous prices being asked for the 1917's and the value will only increase for the unaltered ones. I've owned an 03A3 and the Eddystone is a much sweeter shooter. They've got the strongest actions ever put on a US military rifle. Its the only thing in my collection that I would classify as surplus and its a keeper.

But That's Just Me,
caveat
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the help, guys. The ones I collect are those that already have been altered- they make good accurate rifles. I have an unaltered 1917 in my Military collection along with an '03, 4 garands, 3 carbines, etc. going back to the Civil War. The 1917's are not popular as customs anymore because of their weight [I guess.] Thanks again for the answers.
 
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