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Discussion Starter #1
Has amyone had any experience loading the 200 gr.RNFP "Cowboy" bullet in the 45 ACP?
I have a personal dislike for the 185 and 200 grain SWC. If you like them, fine, I don't knock the other man's game but I just don't like them. I was thinking this 200RNFP might be a good substitute for SWC.
Any comments appreciated.

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John
 

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John, I have shot them before. They tend to be loaded fairly shallow....I have loaded them everywhere from 1.168" to 1.190". Normally, I don't like to go that shallow, but (1) they seem to feed alright; (2) there's a "crimp" groove (remember, these are .45 Long Colt bullets) that facilitates loading them at that depth and (3) I had some reloading info which told me to load at that depth (Lee Manual??). You should check with others on the OAL issue.

Anyhow, be careful with depth and powder selection; pressures can jump up rapidly when loading 45LC bullets in the 45ACP, especially with quick-burning powders like Clays or Bullseye.

For myself, it was a little masochism to get them to work. In addition to the infrequent FTF, they'd also sometimes triggered a premature slide lock apparently due to the bullet nose configuration. It was just a lot easier to go back to the 200gr SWC.
 

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Cowboy of my acquaintance used some in .45ACP, but as for Fremont, had to load them short to get them to chamber. His P220 and military match 1911 fed them ok.
If you want something made for the purpose, however, Laser Cast has a 200 grain ACP roundnose. It has a slight shoulder but is a good feeder and accurate shooter.
 

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I loaded and have shot about 1000 of the 200 lead RN bullets with good results. Accuracy and reliability were comparable to my other standards, the 200 SWC and 230 RN, both also cast. A couple of pointers:
1. Make sure that they are sized .452". Some of the "cowboy" 200RNFP's are sized .454" to accomodate .45 LC guns. Obviously, this will cause pressure problems in a 1911.
2.Seat the bullets such that the case mouth is just at but not over the crimping groove (which was intended for a roll crimp in a .45 LC case). If the case mouth is over the groove, then the case won't get enough bite to adequately secure the bullet. If you seat the bullet too long, where say half of the top band is showing, the round may not chamber in some guns because the lead will engage the rifling before the case mouth engages the shoulder on the chamber. Or, if the round does chamber, it will be hard to extract an unfired round when clearing because the bullet will be stuck in the rifling. I seat the bullet right up to the edge of the crimping groove and taper crimp to .469"-.468". I don't recall the overall length, but if you seat as descibed above, the rounds are well within normal parameters, somewhere between 1.240" and 1.275" (the max OAL).
3. Powder charges. I use 5.0-5.7 gr W231, depending on if I am loading for practice or IDPA. Velocities have been comparable betweein the RN and SWC. Accuracy with the 200 RN has been OK, at least at IDPA distances (5-15 yds).
Hope this helps.
Bill Go
 

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They work extremely well in any unthroated 1911. I load mine to 1.230 OAL. Since the slugs have no shoulder so common in most 200grn. .45 cal. lead auto bullets they slide right into the pipe with ease. Have loaded them with about any and all powders for use in a .45 ACP and accuracy has been above average. Plenty good for any of the action shooting sports. Oregon Trail's have been stellar performers for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all the above replies. Will give them due consideration before I decide to use this bullet.

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John
 
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