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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello I just finished fitting my 3rd 2011 and took it out for test fire. About 7 rounds into the second magazine I get a little debris to the face and notice gas poof out the rear of the gun. It didn’t eject the casing so I cleared it and racked the slide. I picked up the casing and noticed it was blown out. Now I did grab a handful of loose ammo that is a mix. I should have grabbed a new box. I usually use Fusion barrels because they are local but I quick grabbed this barrel off ARFCOM. Not sure the maker.

Thanks for the replies. I forgot to mention it’s 9mm and I do not reload. The mix bag of ammo I’m referring to is a bag ammo that has new/old and ammo that was given to me. Some of it could definitely be reloads.


Wood Automotive exterior Gas Electronic device Rectangle


Also noticed primers bulged

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The barrel on the right is the Fusion barrel and the barrel on the left is the barrel from the new build.

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Should just get a better barrel or did miss something during fitting?

Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Wood Gun accessory

Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Everyday carry Wood
 

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I do not think the bigger issue is the barrel it is the ammo. I would find the rest of that ammo and test fire it in another gun, and not your most expensive gun. Ammo loaded to spec should not come apart like that. IMHO
 
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To my eyes, those primers look like your ammo was creating some high pressures. I don't know if that means too much charge, whether they were seated too long and jamming in the rifling, or what. Of course, there are multiple scenarios that could cause high chamber pressures, but I'd definitely be suspicious of that.
 

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I have a 1911 converted to 400 Corbon. I just pulled it to look at the barrel which is unsupported on the bottom. the case sticks out like yours. The Corbon is rated at 35,000 psi by the more recent SAAMI measurement or 29,000by the old ones. Either way my reloads fire a 135 grain bullet at 1,400 fps and factory 165 grain bullets above 1,350 fps. Your 45 acp should be at 21,000 for standard and maybe 23,000 for plus P. No way you should have a case coming apart like that. I use both 400 corbon cases that use a small rifle primer and I use regular 45 cases I just reform. None have that problem and they fit in the barrel just like yours, not supported at the bottom.

I have 2 thoughts. As I said above, the ammo is too hot. OR, you need to slug the new barrel and see how big the hole is in it. LOL If it is undersize that could be what is causing the back pressure.

Let us know what it is when you know.
 

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To my eyes, those primers look like your ammo was creating some high pressures. I don't know if that means too much charge, whether they were seated too long and jamming in the rifling, or what. Of course, there are multiple scenarios that could cause high chamber pressures, but I'd definitely be suspicious of that.
The outside edge of the primers is still very round.
The cratering is most likely from a poorly fitted firing pin to hole in the slide.
Like a .38 Super pin in a .45 ACP slide.

You should at least examine you reloading procedures to see if you could have loaded excessive powder, or inadequate bullet tension.
Setting back a bullet during loading can produce excessive pressure.

Hold the shell of some remaining rounds and push firmly on the edge of your bench to see if the bullets can slip deeper into the case.
Another thing to try is to find a safe area and manually cycle the rounds though the gun.
It works even better if you use a fine tip sharpie to measure the length of each cartridge and mark them.
I usually use a series of letters in 0.0010 steps and write the letter on the side of the case.
Marking a single letter is a lot easier than trying to write the actual length.
Do the same with a 20 factory loads.

There should be zero movement, even a few thousandths is a red flag.
 

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The barrel on the right is the Fusion barrel and the barrel on the right is the barrel from the new build.
=====================
:ROFLMAO:
I'm going to take a wild guess and say the bbl on the left is the arfcom bbl.

Furthermore. it's hard to tell what caliber you are talking about since you didn't specify, and the picture you posted is really blurry.
I had to "blow up" the picture to read the headstamp.😃
I see that is 9mm.

I'm going to take another wild guess and say you are trying to make 9mm major.
Back in the day, the guys trying to push 38 super to major would blow up cases like that due to insufficient support.

I would say that the arfcom bbl is fine for standard 9mm but insufficient for major 9.
 

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The outside edge of the primers is still very round.
The cratering is most likely from a poorly fitted firing pin to hole in the slide.
Like a .38 Super pin in a .45 ACP slide.
You're right that the primers aren't flattened like we would normally expect from over-pressure, but I think with a relief for the primer to bulge into, you may not see the traditional flattening.
 

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=====================
:ROFLMAO:
I'm going to take a wild guess and say the bbl on the left is the arfcom bbl.

Furthermore. it's hard to tell what caliber you are talking about since you didn't specify, and the picture you posted is really blurry.
I had to "blow up" the picture to read the headstamp.😃
I see that is 9mm.

I'm going to take another wild guess and say you are trying to make 9mm major.
Back in the day, the guys trying to push 38 super to major would blow up cases like that due to insufficient support.

I would say that the arfcom bbl is fine for standard 9mm but insufficient for major 9.
Good catch on the caliber - I just assumed we were talking .45 and couldn't read the headstamps to say otherwise.
 

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I was already sure it was a 9 mm from the NATO cross in a circle headstamp mark. I don't think .45 ACP is a NATO standard caliber. The barrel chamber walls are also way too thick for a .45 ACP and the feed ramp would not be shaped that way. Since I have no experience with a 1911 in 9 mm, that is about all I can contribute.
FWIW, some guns leave this kind of firing pin imprint even with normal velocity loads. I believe it is because the firing pin does not have a lot of resistance to the force of the primer. I know I have at least one 9 mm that does this all the time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for the replies. I forgot to mention it’s 9mm and I do not reload. The mix bag of ammo I’m referring to is a bag ammo that has new/old and ammo that was given to me. Some of it could definitely be reloads.
 

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The barrel on the right or the other barrel on the right?

The barrel on the LEFT has more case exposure and looks like a deeper chamber but not obviously enough to be a risk.

Smooth crater on the primer is either a chamfered firing pin hole or an undersize firing pin.

I am in the Overloaded/Bad Brass Mystery Reload Ammo party right now.
 

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Thanks for the replies. I forgot to mention it’s 9mm and I do not reload. The mix bag of ammo I’m referring to is a bag ammo that has new/old and ammo that was given to me. Some of it could definitely be reloads.
....
Pretty hard to troubleshoot something like this if you don't know what kind of ammo you are using.
 

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OK. my bad. I thought it was 45 also. It is your brass, that raised the flag. Is the primer crimped in? Much of the WCC brass is for government contract and/or military. Much of it is Plus P or Plus P Plus intended for the MP 5 submachine gun. If the primer is crimped there is our clue. There was a lot of it produced with the WCC 96 and WCC 97 head stamp. that went to the feds. The + in the circle may indicate Plus P not sure, just know that both Winchester and Federal were loading hot specialty ammo for federal agencies during those years.

That headstamp has had problems before. Just google it and found one of them below


9mm case failure in WCC 96/97 brass | Mississippi Gun Owners (msgo.com)
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
....
Pretty hard to troubleshoot something like this if you don't know what kind of ammo you are using.
Yeah sorry. I never had problems with this bag off ammo. Never really paid attention to the primers either before now. I was just curious if I was just a ammo issue.
 

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OP,
I had a slam fire exactly like yours with my 1911 .45 ACP. I checked my ammo (reloads) and discovered a few with primers that had not been fully seated. As a result the primers stood proud of the cartridge base. I believe the slam fire was one of those rounds and it detonated before the round fully chambered. Recommend inspecting the primers in the remaining bag of ammo to make sure they're fully seated.
 

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Hello Ranger4,
The cross in a circle is the NATO STANAG emblem. NATO spec 9 mm is a bit hotter than regular SAAMI spec ammunition. NATO spec 9 mm chambers have a free-bore section so that when the bullet separates, the effective chamber size is larger.
European spec ammunition is often even hotter and sometimes pretty close to low end .357 Magnum velocities with a 123 grain bullet at just a bit under 1250 FPS when I chronographed it years ago.

- Ivan.
 

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Thanks. I knew the 9mm NATO ammo was Plus P and much of the import was specifically designed for the MP 5 and others. I could not remember if the Plus P had anything else on the head stamp.

I know there was other import 9mm ammo that was designed for machine guns and it was truly hot.
Many may remember when the Marlin Camp 9 came on the market in 1985 and was pulled off the market in 1999. One of the problems was the design required a replaceable buffer much like the shock buff many of us put in our 1911s. The factory said to replace the buffer every 1,500 rounds, many folks did not and eventually the old one crumbled ad repeated firings damage the back of the receiver. But one of the problems they quoted as a reason to discontinue the gun was the cheap import ammo that people were buying by the case. It was hot ammo designed for the machine guns and said to be battering the little Marlins.

I also know that much of the 7.62 x 39 ammo from Russia is much hotter than commercial US made ammo. Guess Biden has block it so until he is gone that will not be an issue. He was ranting about gun control again today when he spoke about the terrorist that took hostages in Texas. It was the guns fault.
 

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I got some time today so I'll play detective.
Pictures show a variety of headstamps, so I'll guess reloads.
(Strike one)
The blown case is a wcc mil spec brass.
I have a bunch of those shells sitting in a bottle because I gave up trying to reload them. Why? Well, apparently the factory used a super aggressive crimp on the primer pockets. So much so that even when I use a swager to open up the pocket I would still get smashed primers.
So what? Using those shells increases the probability of a high/distorted primer.
Hogcommander raised that possibility. (Strike two)
Ranger4 showed us that some Mississippi boys had trouble with those shells.
(Strike three)
You're running a home built gun with a strange barrel. (Strike four and five)
You didn't say (or don't know) what the ammo spec is. (Strike six)

Sorry to be a Debbie Downer, but that's just too many variables to work with.
Good luck with your project.
....
Re. Marlin camp9
I have one and the buffer crumbled and jammed the gun.
Got a replacement that is supposed to be superior.
Super fun plinking gun.
 
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