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What does the -06 in 30-06 mean? Same question with probably the same answer for 30-30, 45-70, etc.


RWW
 

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RWW said:
What does the -06 in 30-06 mean? Same question with probably the same answer for 30-30, 45-70, etc.


RWW
.30 caliber, cartridge 1906 if my data is correct. .30-30 is .30 caliber, 30 grain black powder. .45 caliber, 70 grains BP. You may see the .45-70 listed as .45-70-X00. The X00 was the bullet weight in grains, either 300 or 400.
 

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RWW said:
What does the -06 in 30-06 mean? Same question with probably the same answer for 30-30, 45-70, etc.


RWW
Not to be too technical, but it is not 30-06 - it is .30-'06. Thirty is the bore (land) diameter of the rifle.
.30-'06 Springfield is the commercial designation of the miltary cartridge adopted, as Mike said, in 1906. It was a modification of the original design adopted in 1903.
JT
 

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jacobtowne said:
... It was a modification of the original design adopted in 1903.
JT
Correct . The first Model of 1903 US Springfields were chambered for the 30-'03 . I think the change in 1906 was related to the bullet weight and shape .

If I'm not mistaken , the second 30 in 30-30 (30WCF) was 30 grains of the then new smokeless powder .
 

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guy sajer said:
Correct . The first Model of 1903 US Springfields were chambered for the 30-'03 . I think the change in 1906 was related to the bullet weight and shape .

If I'm not mistaken , the second 30 in 30-30 (30WCF) was 30 grains of the then new smokeless powder .

You sir are correct, 30 grains of smokeless powder. Now why did I think that cartridge was older then it is???

The original .30-30 Win. load featured a 160-gr. bullet and 30 grs. of smokeless powder for a muzzle velocity of 1970 f.p.s. It was initially called the .30 Winchester Center Fire (WCF). But it was customary then to name blackpowder cartridges by the bore size, followed by the powder charge in grains. Thus, the name soon became ".30-30 Winchester." It had a .30-cal. bullet and 30 grs. of powder, so it was named in the tradition it helped to kill.
From the American Rifleman 2002
 

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Right. The original had a 220-grain RN bullet, the cartridge itself heavily borrowing from the rimless Mauser round (appropriately, since the US Rifle Model of 1903/06 is essentially a Mauser). At the time, militaries were changing to spitzer bullets which yielded better accuracy and range, so came the '06 rifle and round.
JT
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Gentlemen;

Thank you very much for the lesson in rifle cartridges. The knowledge you share is very much appreciated.


RWW
 

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I believe the .30-03 was a bit longer overall lenght for the brass and had a 220 grn bullet. I vaguely think the shoulder was pushed forward about 15 thousands or so. When the German's brought out the Sptizer bullet in 1904 (?) the Army realized the advantange instantly and recreated the .30-03 to the .30-06 (1906 was the acceptance date) and shortened the overall case and moved the shoulder back. Bullet weights came down to 150 grns then I belive the went back up to 162 grns. All of the 03's had to be rechambered for the new revised round.

I am doing all of this from memory and I think it is available in "Hatcher's Notebook".
 

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TangoRomeo said:
See what happens when ya ask a simple question around here! :)

Yep, It does not get any better than that. This is a great site to participate in.

RWW
 

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Winchester drive?

Now for an unrelated tidbit: “Winchester” drive computer storage.

Old timers may remember some of the old computer hard drives being called “Winchester” drives. Many thought, as I did for a while, that they were manufactured by Winchester; not necessarily the arms manufacturer, but maybe a computer manufacturer with that name.

Wrong!

IIRC, it was in the 1970’s when IBM introduced a hard drive that had 30MB of fixed storage, and 30MB of removable storage, thus 30-30 MB of storage. People eventually called this drive Winchester, after the well-known Winchester 30-30 rifle. ;)

Hmmm…

Alex
 

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Ah the first hard disks. Those were huge. It used to take 2 of us to carry a 30 meg cassette hard disk around. As I remember they were about 24 inches across and weighted 50 lbs and unfortunately there was no good carrying point. I never worked with the original 30/30's but the old timers talked about them.

Thinking about hardware, my one small claim to no fame is I had the first compaq 386/33 with 16 megs of memory. I also had 1 gig of hard disk space on two 512 meg hard drives. This would have been about 1990 or so. Compaq reps even came down to our offices (also in houston) to test it and see how it ran. I spent two full days sticking the induvidual 8 pin (or maybe it was 12 pin) chips into a full sized board on both sides filling the memory. You had to straighten each chips pins, then carefully insert them. Again, vague memories, but I think the memory cost $1000 per meg at the time and the whole computer was right at $22,000. I ran that machine hot and hard for many years. Excellent quality!
 

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jacobtowne said:
Not to be too technical, but it is not 30-06 - it is .30-'06. Thirty is the bore (land) diameter of the rifle.
.30-'06 Springfield is the commercial designation of the miltary cartridge adopted, as Mike said, in 1906. It was a modification of the original design adopted in 1903.
JT
Land diameter or Groove diameter?
 

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CCV said:
Land diameter or Groove diameter?
.300 or .30 is the bore diameter. Bore diameter is land diameter, the diameter of the bore before the rifling grooves are cut.
Or am I not understanding the question?
JT
 

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jacobtowne said:
.300 or .30 is the bore diameter. Bore diameter is land diameter, the diameter of the bore before the rifling grooves are cut.
Or am I not understanding the question?
JT
Now, I understand what you're saying. But isn't the groove diameter .308" (same as bullet diameter) and the land diameter less?


Otherwise, the bullet would not be engraved by the rifling.
 

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Exactly. Land dia. is .300 and groove diameter is .308 (from whence the commercial designation .308 Winchester comes). Jacketed bullet diamter is also .308. The lands engrave the bullet about .004.
JT
 
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