1911Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have seen two vendors who sell 45 ACP slides which are fitted for .38 super / 9 mm firing pins. I have done web searches on why this is and haven't found any good information. I also lo0ked through two or three books and didn't find any explanation (other than dimensional differences). Can anyone help me with why this is a preferred configuration? If I get one of these slides, do I also have to purchase a firing pin stop and extractor for a .38 super? Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,233 Posts
The diameter of the firing pin needs to be compatible with the diameter of the hole in the breechface through which the firing pin protrudes.

Different slide manufacturers will have different breechface hole diameters.

Take a look at the firing pins from EGW to see the variety of firing pin diameters they offer.

Can anyone help me with why this is a preferred configuration?
I'm not sure there is a preferred configuration in terms of performance.

If I get one of these slides, do I also have to purchase a firing pin stop and extractor for a .38 super?
No. If you have a .45 slide, you use a .45 extractor. The back end of all firing pins fit all commonly available firing pin stops. All you have to watch out for is getting the right firing pin stop. There are two major varieties: Series 70 style and Series 80 style. You can see the difference between them here: Slide Parts - 1911 Parts
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,233 Posts
EGW said:
We make firing pins that fit slides within .001 to eliminate primer flow and primer shear.

Offered in .066 .068 (Colt / Caspian), .075 (most Springfields) .092 (GI 45).

Many manufacturers have moved to the small firing pins for their 45 caliber guns, which is a good idea and adds to reliability.

This product is not available in titanium, as this contributes to light hits and has issues with chipping.
If EGW says the small ones add to reliability, who am I to question it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,741 Posts
Standardization of the tooling to manufacture and the elimination of the tooling change labor is a driving force in this decision. Basically it is an economic decision. There are no functional drawbacks so it flies.
Joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,572 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
812 Posts
What's considered hot ammo?

Also from FAQ | Ed Brown Products, Inc.

"What type of ammunition do you recommend for your handguns?"

"We recommend high quality Federal or Winchester ammunition, and nothing else. In our years of testing and experience, ammunition by these makers has proven to be of consistent high quality. The core of our function testing for 45 ACP is done with Federal 230 grain FMJ, which is great self-defense ammunition. For accuracy, the Federal 185 grain Gold Medal Match ammo tends to produce the best groups."

What I am wondering is, does Federal or Winchester offer anything that ED Brown may be referring to that would be considered hot loads?

-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I've never had a problem with either size igniting primers. And CCI (Blazer) used small pistol primers in their cheaper .45ACP last I checked.

Edit: I do prefer steel firing pins, whatever the diameter, and I've replaced my titanium ones with steel ones.
Steve,
Thanks very much for the great information!! I agree with the quote from EGW, too! I'll keep your thoughts in mind when it comes to purchasing the firing pins. Thanks, again!!
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top