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Discussion Starter #1
All,

I have 200rds of orginal 400corbon that I have gone through and about a dozen pieces of 45acp that I resized to 400.

Well, after resizing some PMC once fired brass, it is VERY difficult to get it sized at the neck.

I measured the inside diameter of the resized PMC 45acp and it measure ~.365 and starline 400corbon measure ~.385.

What this appears to do is make it very difficult for bullets to be seated in the brass opening without deforming it to one side.

I am thinking of taking a 3/8" rod and pressing it in the opening to make sure there is enough clearance/less interference fit for the incoming bullet.

The other option is to use plated bullets and chill them before seating.

Ideas?

-Warlock
 

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I've formed a lot of .400 Cor-Bon brass from .45 Super. Best ressults are probably from .45ACP +p. I don't know what could be going on with your efforts at resizing .45 ACP into .400 Cor-Bon. I use a Lee die, with no problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Using Lee dies as well

Yeah, I am using Lee dies as well and a cheapy $50 barrel, but, original 400corbon brass from starline has an ID of .375", which causes less brass stretching when bullets are seated.

What type of bullets are you using? Plated or jacketed?

I am tempted to put my bullets into the freezer in hopes that they shrink down far enough for me to get them in the brass without bulging.

that, or try 155gr plated bullets.

Just thinking out loud.

-Warlock
 

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I've used both West Coast plated bullets and jacketed bullets. I always cannelure bullets that I'm going to use for .400 Cor-bon or .40 Super reloading, and I use a RCBS seater/crimp die that roll crimps into the cannelure.

Sounds like you're not belling the case mouths. Even with the handgun bottlenecks, you need to bell the mouth just enough to get the bullets started. The exception to that is when I use bullets such as West Coast plated bullets that are tapered at the heel.

I use AA# 7, exclusively, for reloading both .400 Cor-Bon and .40 Super. I use large magnum pistol primers for .400 Cor-Bon (I don't have any of the new .400 brass with small primer pockets), and I use small rifle primers for reloading .40 Super.

What brand is your $50 barrel? Even a Federal barrel costs more than $50!

Are you lubing the cases before resizing?
 

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What you need to do is the same step that wildcatters do when fireforming or forming cases for rifle chambers; that is, you will need to:

1. Resize
2. Trim to length
3. Inside neck ream to proper I.D.,
4. Chamfer and deburr.

This should give you a good, uniform start point. Don't forget to use the proper expander ball for your cases.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
400corbon reloading procedures...

Ok, here is how I get things going.

I start by taking all brass (new starline or 45acp) and resize it using the 45acp sizing die. (Lee carbide)

Then, I use the 400corbon sizing die and get the neck down.

With starline 400 brass, I have not needed to trim the cases at all. With once fired PMC brass, I take off just a bit at the end.

So, I just reset the powder-through die...

All is good!!!

The trick for 400corbon (and from what i have heard, 357SIG) is that the powder through dies and the seating die have to be set "just so", or else you end up with rounds that are impossible to chamber.

FYI: the cheapo barrel I got is off of ebay or gunbroker. (can't remember which. here is a link to a similar one)

Now, with my Pro1000, I am loading round fairly quickly. Getting the dies setup for consistent rounds is really the trick. (I just dropped some hot-glue onto the dies in the die plate to keep them at their current settings)

-Warlock
 

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It's good that you don't have to trim. However, remember that when you "neck down" from a larger caliber, the brass in the neck area is thicker as a result. You must inside neck ream, a relatively painless process.

You need a case trimmer, and you can buy the reaming outfit separately. I use the RCBS trimmer, and the neck turning/reaming tool from the same people.

If you do not ream the necks, you will be firing with thicker brass at the case mouth than normal, and can experience dangerous pressure spikes because of it.
 

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Lee dies don't have an expander ball.

I've reloaded in excess of 10,000 rounds or .400 Cor-Bon, with many pcs of brass made from .45 Super brass. Never reamed a neck yet, and never had "thick neck" related problems.

You don't need to size on the .45ACP die before you run the .45ACP brass through the .400 Cor-Bon die. You do need to properly bump the shoulder of .400 Cor-Bon brass, which means that you need to set up the sizing die using your barrel (with a clean chamber) as a case gage. The rear of the case should be nearly flush with the rear of the barrel hood.

I've never loaded on a Lee 1000, but have loaded eleventy-zillion rounds of .400 Cor-Bon on a crappy Lee Loadmaster.

What kind of case lube are you using? Are you crimping and seating the bullets at the same time?

What o.a.l. are you using?
 

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I just buy Starline brass and won't try resizing any other brass,
powderman is right, if you size down .45 to .40 your going to have
some thickness at case mouth, and I use Lee dies and they DO
expand the case mouth very well, not much, just enough to get
bullet started,I have plated and jacked and I am trying some home made lead Lee .401 cal. 145 gr. SW. I use wheel weights
so lead is hard, what is the rate of twist in .400? is it same as
,40 or 10mm?:barf: love that pumkin!:rock:
 

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bud, Just mildly curious: How much .400 Cor-Bon reloading have you done? Have you ever discussed the "thick neck" theories with Peter Pi, prez of Cor-Bon? Have you asked Starline how they make their .400 Cor-Bon brass? Would it surprise you to know that they neck-down their .45ACP+p brass?

Not trying to be contentious, but one of the "perks" of reloading .400 Cor-Bon is that you can neck down .45 ACP cases, with no neck reaming, trimming, or other preparation.

BTW, I have spent a little time in discussing .400 Cor-Bon with Peter Pi; have discussed with Starline necking down .45Super and .45ACP+p brass. I have loaded well over 10,000 rounds of .400 Cor-bon, many of which were loaded with necked-down .45 Super brass.
 

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as of today I've reloaded 800 rds of .400 corbon, all used starline or new starline brass, I have .45 super brass and it stays .45 super brass, don't know peter pi, and web of .400 is thicker than most .45 acp brass, whats wrong with just buying .400 corbon brass?:barf:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
My magic formula for 400corbon

All,

Here is my "favorite" formula for 400corbons.

By starting with 45acp brass that is well cleaned (8hrs in the tumbler at least), I deprime them by hand with a carbide Lee 45acp decaper/case sizer.

With fired 400corbon brass, I just size it first with the 45acp die, then put it through the 400corbon sizer on my progressive press.

I use either 155gr JHP or 165gr flat nose 40cal bullets.

10.2gr of BlueDot. Although, I am thinking of going with W296 or VV. I get more feedback from BlueDot than with Unique.

I use CCI 350 Large Pistol Magnum primers.

I set the OAL at 1.19".

Setting the expader die too deep when powdering will cause bulges at the shoulder.

Regards,

-Warlock
 

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bud: There's nothing wrong with buying new .400 Cor-Bon brass from Starline. That's what I did, until they changed (at Cor-Bon's request) to small primer pockets. I have several thousand pcs. of .400 Cor-Bon brass that I either bought new from Starline or formed from .45 Super. A reloading friend of mine suggested that I weigh .400 Cor-Bon brass and compare it to .45 Super brass. I did that, and found, to my surprise, that the .400 Cor-Bon was heavier than .45 Super. I then contacted Starline, and they told me that their .400 Cor-Bon brass was made of their .45 +p brass, and that their .45 +p brass is, in fact, stronger than their .45 Super brass.

Accordingly, if I decide to "acquire" any additional .400 Cor-Bon brass, which is not likely, as I became bored with .400 Cor-bon over a year ago, I'll neck-down some Starline .45 +p brass. You do understand that I wouldn't want to have small and large primer pockets intermixed??
 

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Warlock:

You can save yourself some tumbler time by using 2 steps.

A couple of hours (about 2) with walnut. I use Turbo Activator in mine with walnut, does a really good job of cleaning inside and out.

Then, 2 hours with treated corn cob. Makes it shine like a new nickel.
 

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100_warlok W296 is a powder for this cal. ? never seen reload
data with this powder, if your brass was small primer would you use mag pistol or rifle primers, not a flame, , WalterGC, having mixed primers would be a pain in the butt, didn't know you where into this cal so long. for me its a hoot! having fun tring loads, tried .45 Super and about killed a few pistols, is this why you converted your Super brass into .400?no flame! as long as it all
works we're ok.:rock:
 

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Bud: I bought the .45 Super brass from Starline specifically to form into .400 Cor-Bon...before I found out that +p would have been a better choice.

I have shot some .45 Super through one of my G21's, using a compensated barrel and pretty heavy spring. I don't find .45 Super to be at all interesting....just dumping more powder into a beefed--up .45 ACP case doesn't move me!

I thought the bottlenecks would be interesting, but was/am disappointed that I can't get them to feed reliably from Glock pre-ban mags. I have to use the 10-rd., G21 mags.

I do have a threaded, compensated .400 Cor-Bon barrel for one of my 70 Series Gold Cups. I've shot a few hundred rounds through it

.40 Super, in my opinion, is a better design for a hunting round than is .400 Cor-Bon. Of course, you can't just neck down .45 ACP brass to form .40 Super, and Triton, .40 Super's manufacturer is out-of-business.
 
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