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Discussion Starter #1
David cycled these trough his magazine about 6 times before this happened. He wants me to put more crimp on them but I won't. Is this a feed ramp issue or do I seat the bullets a bit deeper? I already put a very slight crimp on it. My P90 and my other son's HK doesn't do this. So I'm open for suggestions. Thanks Rob Sr.

 

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Measure you overall cartridge length, the one on the left looks a little short. It should be about 1.250 or a little longer for hardball, and crimp them to .468 - .470,

Hope this helps
Byrd
 

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Discussion Starter #3
These were all seated to 1.274, his action and rechabering time and time again drove them in where they are now. 230 gr fmj westcoast is what they are.
 

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SETBACK BAD, VERY BAD

Acquire ("buy") a LEE / EGW undersized sizing die for those used 45 ACP cases, because crimp will not secure a bullet; case neck tension secures a bullet.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
do you have a lee part number. i can't find it on the web site, if I had a number I could do a search.
 

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I had the same problem with plated bullets. OAL was 1.250" and "crimp" or "neck tension" was .469". The only thing I discovered was that the problem was more previlant with Federal brass, and not too bad with Winchester brass. Since I shoot a mixed bag of brass, I just stick with 200gr SWC Miesters.....problem solved.
 

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I have a few dummy rounds I made up and the Remington R-P cases look like yours after hand cycling several times, so I won't run jacketed bullets thru Remington cases because of it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
winchester cases, I really apreciate the responses, but I think it might be a magazine isuue, but not sure I will keep trying what you all suggest and let you know what happens.
 

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rborensr,
There seem to be many ways to get a bullet loose in the case. There are several that have not been mentioned.
Over-Belling/Expanding the case: This is one that sounds like it "Fits the Bill" in this case. The Expander should be .001" smaller than the bullet for jacketed rounds. Belling should be held to a minimum (only enough to barely start the bullet in the case).
The bullet is held in position by neck tension, NOT THE CRIMP! Over crimping can cause the bullet to be crushed loosening the grip of the case as the brass springs back. Under crimping will cause feed/chambering problems.

Check the diameter of your expander and make sure you're not using one for cast/swaged rounds.
Also, the finished/crimped diameter formula that I use is
(2x case neck thickness + bullet diameter) - .001" for light crimp or .002" for medium.
Much more will only overwork the brass and can be detrimental to the round.

Hope this helps,
Bert
 

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Discussion Starter #10
GlocknSchpiel, I learned that years ago and I have always set the bell so that the bullet will just start in the case. In fact, you can't see my bell with the eye, but you can barely feel it. I'm using dillon dies, and am wondering if the dies aren't sizing small enough. But if you look at the cartridges, there is a deffinate gouge in the bullets, it is catching on something, that is what has me baffled. I don't think it's my reloads because it feeds just fine in my p90 and my sons HK. I think it's magazine or feed ramp, don't know that's why I'm here asking. Thanks.
 

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Your bullets are gouged-check the feed ramp and bbl of the 1911 you are using them in and see if the bottom of the bbl. is overhanging the frome or perhaps even with it. It should set back in the bbl. bed of the frame about 1/32 of an inch.

I doubt there is a magazine issue, because there is nothing in the mag. that will gouge a bullett nose like that. It has to be something in the path of the bullett going up the feed ramp into the chamber...

Byrd
 

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There are three problems here.

The feedway is not smooth and straight, the bullets are most likely being gouged against the bottom edge of the barrel, per Byrd.

The bullets are not tight enough in the brass, due to thin brass, too large sizing die, too large expander, or too much flare. You cannot get enough bullet pull with crimp.

You cannot count on ANY loaded round lasting six cycles through the feeding system. Even factory loads can be set back with that much handling. Don't play with your ammo. Every time I unload and reload a carry or house gun, I compare the chambered round with a fresh one. If there is any visible setback it goes in the practice box and I load with new. If there is a lot of setback, it is trashed and I think about a different brand. Three or four passes is about the limit with the Federals I have now.

I have had a lot of trouble with bullet setback in various guns. I now load .45 JHP with a cannelure in the brass at the base of the bullet. It is an extra step but it secures the bullet.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I figured it out I think, when the bullet shoots from the mag to the chamber, it hits the top corner of the barrel and that is where the gouge is comming from. The bullet fits perfectly in that section. Now the question is, just don't cycle bullets that many times, like Jim said. Personally I put the bullet in the chamber by hand and then release the action, and I know that people say you're not to do it that way, but my dessert eagle and p90 hasn't had problems and the dessert eagle was bought new in 89 and the p90 was last year no problems. So anyway, that's that.
 

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rborensr said:
Personally I put the bullet in the chamber by hand and then release the action, and I know that people say you're not to do it that way, but my dessert eagle and p90 hasn't had problems and the dessert eagle was bought new in 89 and the p90 was last year no problems.
You really can't compare the 3 firearms. A Desert Eagle has a rotating bolt containing a spring loaded extractor much like an AR-15 rifle. A Ruger P90 uses an external type extractor. Both types are imune to the stresses of loading in this fashion, unlike the internal extractor of a standard 1911.
 
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