1911Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am new to reloading and use a Dillon Square Deal to load 230 LRN .45 ACP

I have had problems with bullet chambering. My bullets were 1.270 to 1.275 and a width of 0.473 at the top of the brass case.

I figured out that the bullets weren't seating correctly since the top ring of the bullet (LRN) was exposed and there was a slight gap between the ring and the case. I addressed this by adjusting Station 3 and now have a bullet length of 1.230 and it seats properly without rings showing. It also passes the plunk test. For comparison purposes, my commercial rounds are 1.250 and 0.470 width.

Two questions: 1) I am loading 4.2 grains of Bullseye. Will the slightly shorter cartridge length create pressure problems? and, 2) I am considering adjusting Station 4 to get to 0.470 width since this is what I measure with commercial loads and this takes makes the transition from the bullet to the brass nearly flush whereas I still have a very slight edge now.

Thoughts?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,943 Posts
Welcome to our Reloading Bench section of the Forum. Glad to have you and hope you'll be a "regular". :)

Your questions are not uncommon for beginning reloaders, and we get them, or some variation of them, at least weekly.

Your did good in figuring out on your own that the overall length (OAL) of your rounds (round, not bullet, the bullet is the projectile) was too long at 1.270. Although you OAL will work at 1.230", it should also work at 1.250" which is a fairly common OAL for a round using that bullet.

To answer your specific questions:
1. You are fine and safe using 4.2gr Bullseye with that OAL. That would still be considered a mild to moderate load.

2. What you are calling "width at the top of the brass case" we commonly call "crimp dimension". Typical crimp dimension run from as little as 0.468" to as much as 0.473", with most of us crimping between 0.470-0.471. So, you will be fine with a crimp dimension in that range. Crimp dimension is really only important to achieve smooth feeding of the round.

Again, welcome to the Forum.
 

·
Super Moderator
EDC: SIG P938.
Joined
·
22,334 Posts
I have some factory rounds with case mouth diameters as large as .473", but most are closer to .470", and that's the crimp dimension I use for all of my .45 ACP handloads.
I load most roundnose bullets to 1.26" OAL, though some will require shorter lengths to chamber properly, I've never loaded any bullet longer than 1.265", regardless of shape or weight.
Any bullet with a shoulder, however slight, should have the shoulder flush, or slightly above flush, or you will have trouble consistently crimping over a tapered part of the bullet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
1.250 is a good length for the 230 gr in the 45ACP. I have heard of some people having trouble with the full length rounds of lead bullets @1.275 hanging up in certain magazines. As suggested in previous posts, a taper crimp of .469-.470 is usually ideal. Due to the size of the 45 ACP case and the low pressures involved, varying the seating depth .025 or so, makes little difference, unless you are running maximum loads. I use the 4.3 gr of Bullseye with the cast 230 gr bullet. It makes IPSC major easily in my 1911, while still being civil to shoot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you very much for your replies. Very helpful. This is a fun hobby and this forum is a good community and hopefully as I gain more experience I will be able to also be a contributor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
579 Posts
I load mostly lead SWC bullets in my 45ACP. I find that the critial dimention is not OAL but base to bullet shoul;der of ca. 0.937". That allows nout a silly millimeter of the base exposed.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top