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My experience with this has been unless the bullet has a cannelure that you can crimp the case mouth into you pretty much have to rely on case neck tension to hold the bullet so a roll crimp doesn't really offer much advantage.
^^^This. Without a cannelure to "roll" the crimp into, you aren't really making a roll crimp. Attempting to do so probably will lessen the neck tension your have and make the bullet more prone to "jumping" crimp.

Jumpin' crimp in a revolver is something that generally happens with heavy bullets over a heavy powder charge. A moderate .45 ACP load is nuttin' close.
 

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Always a taper-crimp for the .45ACP.
 

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My bullets do creep forward a bit, with taper-crimped, plated 230s.
Not enough that I have gone looking for bullets with a crimp groove, but it would be interesting to chrono a cylinder-full and see if the velocity drops from first round to last.
 

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^^^This. Without a cannelure to "roll" the crimp into, you aren't really making a roll crimp. Attempting to do so probably will lessen the neck tension your have and make the bullet more prone to "jumping" crimp.

Jumpin' crimp in a revolver is something that generally happens with heavy bullets over a heavy powder charge. A moderate .45 ACP load is nuttin' close.
Not having a crimp groove is no big deal at all with a lead bullet. I've loaded a ton on 230 gr. RN into .45 AR (and .45 Schofield, which uses the same weight bullet) and simply turned the crimp into the body of the bullet. As long as the alloy isn't hard as a rock it will work just fine, and won't compromise accuracy one bit. Those 230 gr. bullets were intended for .45 ACP target loads, but I quit using lead in .45 ACP long ago so I used them as I indicated above.

Btw, not having a crimp groove has no bearing whatsoever on whether or not the case has a roll crimp. The case still gets the case mouth rolled, it just isn't into a premade groove, and if you seat the bullet first before applying a crimp, it doesn't affect neck tension one bit.
 

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I taper crimp all of my .45 acp rounds and they work fine in both 1911 and S&W 625 revolver.
I use 200 Gr coated LSWC bullets and a light load of bullseye so definitely not +P level recoil.
 

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An auto magazine doesn't move, so you don't have to worry about inertia walks the bullets out of the case.
Say what?
Of course the magazine moves.
And the bullets can start to be pushed back into the cases when they hit the front of the magazine.

It is the recoil and the inertia of the bullet that leads to pulling from cases.

That same inertia is present in an auto pistol that recoils but the revolver holds the case from the rear (using a rimmed case or moon clips).

The old jet revolvers used a long tapered case (.357 case necked down to .22) and had their own sets of problems ejecting fired cases from the cylinder.

When you fire an auto pistol those bullets are jerked around enough to actually start to push than back into the case.as the bullets strike the front of the magazine.
 

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The only time I had problems with bullet pull from a 45 cap revolver was with 230gr and up and with stiff powder charge. Example would be a 460 Rowland type load. In the case of such loads I definitely roll crimp other wise a taper crimp has worked for me and I usually just reload range pick up brass how ever that is my experience in my guns yours and everyone else's experience could be vastly different

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I have one revolver that can shoot 45 Auto, but it is a Blackhawk and can not use moon clips. I rarely shoot 45 Auto out of it but use my regular ammo from the stash when I do so. If I had a double action revolver that could use moon clips I would probably load ammo specifically for it by using the bullets I generally use for 45 Colt and by using a roll crimp.
 

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Say what?
Of course the magazine moves.
And the bullets can start to be pushed back into the cases when they hit the front of the magazine.

It is the recoil and the inertia of the bullet that leads to pulling from cases.

That same inertia is present in an auto pistol that recoils but the revolver holds the case from the rear (using a rimmed case or moon clips).

The old jet revolvers used a long tapered case (.357 case necked down to .22) and had their own sets of problems ejecting fired cases from the cylinder.

When you fire an auto pistol those bullets are jerked around enough to actually start to push than back into the case.as the bullets strike the front of the magazine.

We're talking in relative terms here. In a revolver, the case rim holds the rounds in place, and the whole cylinder recoils with the gun, thus the bullet can move due to inertia. In an auto, the magazine holds the rounds, while the slide absorbs the vast majority of the recoil. The magazine doesn't move that much in relative terms. You can see the same effect in a rifle even more. A box magazine in a bolt rifle is rigidly mounted to the action, so the tips of the bullets get smashed into the front of the magazine when the rifle recoils. In an AR, the magazine is not attached rigidly while the BCG absorbs the movement generated by recoil. If you are getting bullets pushed into the case in an autoloader, you've got some pretty poorly made ammo. I shot about 100k rounds of .45 +P in combat pistol matches over a decade and never had a bullet move in the case. I have had factory .45 ball where the bullet moved however, and that was due to poorly sized brass that wasn't holding the bullet properly.
 
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