1911Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I loaded some 230gr LRN ammo marked for .45 caliber yesterday, and it seemed like the bullets were really tight in the casings. There were lead scrapings on the rim of the case where it appeared the bullet was trimming itself against the case as it was seated. They seated well, and OAL was fine, but I'm concerned about pressure with the tight fit. What do you guys think?
Scatmanblues.
Oh yeah, the bullets were Midway, the label reads "45 CAL 230 Gr Cast RN"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
The diameter of 45 acp jacketed bullets are .451. The cast lead bullets are usually .452. You should bell the case mouths a little wider when loading cast lead bullets and the problem should go away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Originally posted by JoeG:
The diameter of 45 acp jacketed bullets are .451. The cast lead bullets are usually .452. You should bell the case mouths a little wider when loading cast lead bullets and the problem you describe should go away.


[This message has been edited by JoeG (edited 11-11-2001).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
458 Posts
You probably should measure bullet diameter. If you don't have a caliper or micrometer (and assuming you don't want to go buy one or the other) you can usually get a the reloading expert from your local independant component provider to measure the bullet diameter for you... perhaps you don't want to explain that you bought bullets from a mail-order competitor ???

It is very common practice to shoot cast bullets that are .001 -to- .003 over groove diameter in revolver barrels. The limiting factor in revolver is 'throat diameter' of the cylinder -- in a semi-auto pistol, perhaps the similar limiting factor is chamber diameter ?

I routinely shoot .403-dia. cast bullets in my .40-cal. Glock (0.400-groove dia.) and .432-dia. cast bullets in my .44-Mag. (0.429 groove dia) with no ill effects whatsoever. Of course, this does NOT necessarily mean that .452 -to- .454 bullets will work safely or satisfactorily in your .45ACP. --CC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
I have purchased lead bullets from different companies and I have found out to get proper head spacing resize you'r lead bullets. The lead bullets aren't all in spec.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
So are these loads safe to shoot? They are loaded over 4.7gr of Titegroup. I definatly don't want a KABOOM when I take them to the range. Thanks,
Scatmanblues
 
T

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Originally posted by JoeG:
The diameter of 45 acp jacketed bullets are .451. The cast lead bullets are usually .452. You should bell the case mouths a little wider when loading cast lead bullets and the problem should go away.
Agree with JoeG. I've loaded thousands of .452 RNL bullets and just belled the case mouth a little more to accept the bullet.
No worries about pressure as long as the OAL is kept in spec.
More important is to clean off the excess lube on the finished rounds and guage all your ammo in the proper case guage.
I use a Dillon guage and never have problems with ammo not chambering.
Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
458 Posts
S.M.B. >> My Hodgdon data book shows 4.8-gr. max w/a 230 grain _JACKETED_ bullet. I just loaded and shot a few 230-gr. jacketed TCs over 4.6-grains Titegroup and they appeared to be 'lite' to me... not a measured result, but a perceived result. (I also loaded a 230-gr. Cast RN over the same powder and charge).

Lead-alloy bullet loads typically produce less pressure for the same amount of a given powder than the same weight bullet in a jacketed form. This is why you should NOT substitute a jacketed bullet for a cast-bullet specified load.

I doubt you're anywhere near going 'kaboom' with your 4.7-gr. Titegroup load, even if your bullet is .452-in. diameter.

Opinion only -- but as I previously stated in an earlier post, I personally prefer oversized lead bullets. --CC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks, it's good to know I'm not about to go KABOOM!
This has really been a fascinating process, and I can't believe how much there is to know. Thanks all for the good advice.
Scatmanblues
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
550 Posts
To Scatmanblues:

My primary form of exercise is jumping to conclusions, and here is my leap for today:

Most of your questions should have been answered by reloading manual study prior to any reloading, suggesting that you may not be following the prescribed course of study. Reloading manuals are intended to provide the information you need to keep you out of trouble, and should be studied before you start reloading. Internet forums are useful for fine points, but should not be relied upon for basic information.

If you have not obtained and digested at least one and preferably more good manuals, it is time to put away the press and go to school. For cast bullet reloaders, the Lyman manual is probably best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,005 Posts
If you meant MidwayUSA when you mentioned "Midway" as the bullet source, note that a lot of their bullet sales are repackaged bullets. It doesn't hurt to check a little more closely if a problem arises; they can make mistakes.

.45 Long Colt bullets are usually .454, and I suppose it is remotely possible that you got some bullets that were mis-identified in the repackaging. Just a thought.

------------------
If God didn't want us to own guns, why did He make the 1911?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
KLN,
I agree that study before action is important. That's why I had my press for almost a month before I loaded a single round. I've got the Lyman's and NRA manuals and have read each carefully. I'm really not intending to be snide at all. My purpose in using this forum is to get reinforcement of my thinking and also fresh perspectives on what problems occur. I could find nothing about lead shaving off of a case while seating, but because of my reading about the dangers of exessive pressure I wanted to know if using a minimum charge of powder underneath the bullet would be considered too risky, or if an oversize bullet was not as important a concern as I was afraid it might be. What I've always liked about this forum is that no one is afraid to point out an honest shortcoming. Please don't hesitate to flag something I'm not doing right. If anything I really am trying to err to the side of caution by asking such simple questions. If the answers don't come back the way I expect, then it means I DO need to head back to the books.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Accidentally quit early on the last one.

jpwright,
You make a good point about possible mis-labelling of components. I measured a few of the seated bullets and none were any wider than .43 at the case mouth. I figure that if I got .454 bullets I would see a wider diameter than that above the case rim. If the bullet was too big I think the bullet would extend at least to or beyond the diameter of the case itself, which is not occuring.
Thanks everybody for all the advice,
Scatmanblues
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top