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Discussion Starter #1
This weekend I had two buddies heckling me about the 500 round break in period for kimbers. Saying that because of that I have bought a cheap $1k gun. Citing their own guns (S&W sigma, CZ75, etc.) they made the assumption that theirs are better. Can you guys give me something to say to back myself up?
 

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Don't say anything . . . Let them shoot it and judge for themselves, chances are they already have their minds made up but you just might change them with some range time.

RC
 

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Darengin

CZ and S&W pistols are known for benifitting from a break in period also. Though your friend with the Sigma has very little room to talk, the Sigma was a not so very good knock off of a Glock, S&W has to pay glock royalties and had to pay penalties for patent infringement due to the Sigma. Plus it does not have a great reputatuion for reliability or longevity. While the CZ has an excellent reputation for almost everything, if anyone complains about a CZ it is about how short the slide is.

So I agree with Stinger, just keep quiet and keep shooting. More than likely your Kimber will be very good out of the box and will get better the more you shoot it. Let your friends shoot it every now and then so they can get jellous.
 

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every 1911 needs to go thru a break in period...even full custom guns costing over 2K...its no big deal...i would break in any pistol to make sure everything is working well.
 

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gregshin said:
every 1911 needs to go thru a break in period...even full custom guns costing over 2K...its no big deal...i would break in any pistol to make sure everything is working well.
gregshin is dead on. Never trust your life to a weapon until it has fired at least 500 hiccup free rounds. If you want to call it a "break in period", so be it - I call it insurance.
 

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ANY machine that has moving parts has a "break in" period. Not just guns. Go buy a new car and notice how you get better gas mileage, and it runs smoother when the engine breaks in after 5-15 thousand miles. Go buy a good set of stereo speakers and hear how much better they sound after about 100 hours of play-time on them to break in the speaker cones. Same thing with a quality amplifier that doesn't even have moving parts after the electronics burn-in. But I believe that people put more emphasis on a break-in period with guns because we are usually betting our lives on them.

I have always read and been told that EVERY firearm, ESPECIALLY every SEMI-AUTO firearm needs a break-in of AT LEAST 2-300 rounds for all of the parts to sufficiently mate up and seat with each other and "rub down" all of the rough edges. And more than that if the tolerances are tighter. That goes for handguns, shotguns, rifles, etc. I don't understand why so many people on this forum don't seem to accept or understand this. Kimber reccomends 500 rounds, which is a little more that most manufacturers because their tolerances ARE tighter that most others. So what! Why would anyone bet their life on any weapon that has not been tested?

Also, just because a particular guns never malfunctions from the start, or stops malfunctioning after 50 or 100 rounds doesn't mean that is is sufficiently "broken in" already. You still need to put the balance of the reccomended rounds through the gun to achieve the desired results.

Good luck, and see how much smoother that gun is after you put the 500 rounds down range.
 

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Breaking in

I guess my Kimber TLE is broken in now. I can't really tell because it always worked fine from the time I took it out of the box. It is just really accurate. It shoots to point of aim and has never been touched by anyone to make any "adjustments". I shoot it better than any other pistol I own and I think that is because of the inherent quality of the pistol.

Now, my Kahr PM9....there was a break-in period. The gun shot fine after the first 100 rounds, but felt gritty and balky when handled. After 300 rounds, it became totally reliable and just "felt" better to me. Kahr makes a big deal about a break-in period, and I would agree.

No one ever talks about a break-in period for a SigSauer, but I have a new P239 and while it works great, when I shot a friend's old P239 (over 1000 rounds, several years of carry), I thought he had worked on the pistol. No, it was just the result of parts fitting together well and smoothing out with use. I can already see that my Sig is going down the same path.

All machines have some break-in required. Some manufacturers are just more up front about it.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
thanks guys, lol they were giving me hell about it. Now I feel a lot better.
 

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The proof, as they say, is in the pudding. Shoot them all, and see which one is most consistent. It sounds more like a bit of envy on the part of your friends, who don't have a Kimber 1911.

Feez68:
Exactly which electrical part burns in?:
"Same thing with a quality amplifier that doesn't even have moving parts after the electronics burn-in."
Chris
 
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