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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

Having a crazy thought and this seems to be the place to talk about it. I want to get an Aluminum 80% 1911 frame, finish it, put in trigger group, safety, frame parts, and a 22 conversion kit. Fair weight, AL wouldn't be battered by 22, pretty low cost, and fun to build it yourself.
Now....would this be feasible from the stand point that the accuracy needed in finishing the rails isn't going to be a critical vs a centerfire gun? or does the 22 kit still require tight tolerances on the slide to frame fit?
Just thinking it would be a fun plinker to build up and have to train newbies with.
Thanks in advance if you can provide any thoughts, insight, suggestions, etc.
 

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Hi sfoo:
I have a Marvel .22 conversion and it is one of the most accurate .22 conversions made. Costs a little more than some of the others. This conversion is locked tightly to the frame using a new slide lock pin that is included in the kit. The critical surface on which it rests are the rail tops, just above the slide stop pin hole. The rails to the rear of this are used to guide the aluminum slide of the conversion and have no accuracy function, just allow the slide to feed ammo and eject empties. An alloy frame would work very well with the Marvel conversion. You would end up with a very light pistol.

I would say you should go for it.

I am building a commander slide, officers frame carry gun where the frame is alloy and the beavertail and the main spring housing are aluminum with a plastic recoil spring guide. This gun weighs 24 oz. less magazine and ammo, a real featherweight. And it is not punishing to shoot.

Good luck with your project.
 

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Where would one get a 80% aluminum frame and
just what is meant by 80% ??
I take that to mean 80% fimished,are all pin holes drilled or reamed and finished ??
What has to be done to use this frame ??
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi Guys,


TANNERY_SHOP over at the ar15.com Build it yourself forum has them. I'll try and dig up his web site.

An "80%" frame is one that isn't completed yet. In this case, the slide rails haven't been machined/filed/etc. Since it isn't a complete firearm, little to no paperwork to do for it as long as you build it for your self, and never sell it.

Right now he only has steel frames for the 1911, but said he'd be doing some Alloy frames in the near future.

Drat I'll find his web page or point him over this way....

As soon as I submit this I find it [
]
http://www.tanneryshopinc.homestead.com Also has 80% 10/22 and AR15 lower receivers.

[This message has been edited by sfoo (edited 08-31-2001).]
 

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sfoo, I did almost exactly what you're proposing. Put a Ciener conversion on an old aluminum frame (mine was already finished), added the fire control parts and wound up with a near-perfect training aid for new shooters (I teach beginner classes). Very light weight, virtually no recoil or report, very good accuracy. The only drawback (common to most, if not all, conversions I'm aware of) is that the slide doesn't lock back after the last shot is fired.

It's a great plinker, and an awful lot of fun to shoot.

------------------
Those who ignore history are doomed to repeat it.
 

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Hi sfoo,
Looks like you just discovered this forum too! I bought one of the Tannery Shop frames to play with myself. Although it'll be a while before I get around to finishing it (too many projects - so little time), I plan on going for accuracy so I'll be reading a lot of posts before proceeding.

A note to others interested in the 80% game: Apparently the court system has deemed a receiver that is finished no more than 80% to be a non-gun, and therefore no FFL transfer is needed. The drawback is you aren't supposed to sell it, but finding this in writing seems to be an elusive critter. You may want to check with state and local requirements on building your own too. As far as the feds are concerned no serial number or markings are required, but it is recommended that you mark it in some way, just in case it gets stolen. LEO's have said the same thing; they need some kind of number to run.

The Tannery Shop 80% receivers are a high quality steel casting, as are their 100% finished slides. Alloy castings are in the works. Apparently the only work needed is to cut the slides, as all the holes are in. Other than that minor fitting and finishing will put you in business. Again, I haven't touched mine yet. This info has been garnered from various posts in the build it yourself forum at AR15.com. Also, there is a new post today with a link to another company selling 1911 frames, only these are forgings: http://www.dlask.com/newprod.htm
 
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