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In Maryland, they banned AR-15's as being too dangerous, and all their copy cats, but chambered for a different round they are perfectly legal. That is right, you can't buy a 5.56 AR-15, but you can buy an AR-15 in .308 Win or AR-10 in 7.62mm because they are much safer. 🙄

Oh but wait, if the AR-15 is an HBAR, well that's different, that extra 4 oz of metal on the barrel makes it so much safer.....

This is how dysfunctional the politics are in this state. The MD State Police in MD have a marksmanship program for youth, they use Colt AR-15 HBAR, simply because the legislature does not want to spend extra money to replace the rifles, and they can't stand to cancel any government program, is why they make an exception for AR-15's that are an HBAR. But they want us to believe it was only safety was the reason they banned the AR-15, although they never really banned it, just limited a few options in how your AR-15 is configured.:sneaky:

Want to know what it feels like to be screaming the Emperor is naked, while a naked man walks down the street with everyone around saying, why yes, that is a fine suite of clothes he is wearing, well move to Maryland.
 

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Now to go down another rabbit hole, barrel length and muzzle velocity?
I totally get how a longer barrel creates more muzzle velocity for both rifles and pistols. The round spends more time accelerating under pressure from the burning propellant as it travels down the longer barrel, thus a higher peak velocity as it exits the barrel....

But I read somewhere that revolvers also achieve higher muzzle velocity with longer barrels? Is that wrong?
If so, how? Once the round leaves the cylinder and enters the barrel the pressure can bleed out in the gap from the cylinder and barrel? I always assumed it was the momentum that carried it down the barrel to impart the spin....

Could it be a case of the pressure of the burning propellant is so great and so fast, that it can't all leak out between the gap in the cylinder and barrel and its actually still producing pressure in the barrel pushing the round out?

Sorry, I know nothing about revolvers, other than to know how fake Hollywood is when they put silencers on revolvers.
 

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My question is, how far can we get off topic?
 

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For what it's worth:



I enjoy working to master the .45 ACP, I love my 1911s and fully understand that you can load more 9mm in a magazine than .45. However if the 9 is more controllable andthen why do you need more ammo. My conclusion for watching lots of video and shooting myself is that shot placement is the determining factor. A .22 LR can kill with one shot and I can get 30 in a Keltec PMR. The .45 ACP makes larger hole and as our good doctor mentioned in the first video handguns kill by causing blood loss, thus might have the edge if well placed. So I suppose that you need more shots of 9mm to get a well placed shot.

Personally I take the Conservative view, if you like 9mm then you shoot 9mm, I like shooting the .45 and ask that you give me the same latitude and not be a Liberal about the issue. Remember the gun you have is infinitely better than the gun you don't! Happy shooting not matter your choice ............. ain't America great!!!!
 

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... Some fun ideas for preference of 9 vs 45 decisions :) :
...
9 is a nice round, but for CQB if you can shoot 45 well (and not everyone can), that is always my first choice .
All this discussion intrigued me, so today I went to the range with three guns to measure ease of shooting & recoil across the three guns in one sitting. I measured recoil by the amount of muzzle flip. I shot each gun as follows:
  1. 10 rounds, two handed grip.
  2. 10 rounds, right hand only
  3. 10 rounds, left hand only
Disclosure: I am 77 years old, with below-average grip & arm strength. However, I have shot in IPSC/USPSA competition over 500 rounds of 9mm, & then moved to .45 ACP & shot about 1,000 rounds of that. I don't score very high, but I get to practice my defensive gun skills in somewhat realistic scenarios.

Here are the guns I shot today (all ammo was FMJ):
  1. Colt 1911 Commander in .45 ACP. Good amount of muzzle flip, but easily controlled in both two- & one-handed shooting.
  2. Glock G43x (3" barrel) in 9mm. Somewhat less muzzle flip.
  3. Walther PPK/S in .380 ACP. Almost no muzzle flip, & yet some shooters complain about the recoil.
I could shoot the Colt & Walther all day without any discomfort, but that Glock recoil somehow sends some of the recoil to my trigger finger. Glock has had 30 years to fix this, & yet it persists. In a self-defense situation, the shooting would be over before I would notice the small discomfort, but it is more annoying at the range. When Colt starts shipping its Defender 9mm in stainless, I will probably upgrade from the Glock. The Springfield Arms 9mm EMP looks nice, but some of the reports scare me.

I carry the Colt in some scenarios, & the Glock in others.
 

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Well, SA EMPs are 1911s in terms of their parts/design but they are specifically designed for 9mm. To my knowledge no way to make a 9mm EMP shoot .45 ACP since the receiver is sized for 9mm magazines.
They were also made in .40S&W for a while. I have one, and prefer it to the 9mm, and I have one of those, too. Overall, I prefer .40S&W to 9mm anyway.

That said, I do low to shot my FN Browning High Power in 9mm.
I've got one of those in .40S&W, too. Again, just my preference for the .40.
 

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Here is my family of NINES, all are 100% reliable & more accurate then I am. All have their own inherent qualities & advantages. I didn't see an advantage to owning a 9MM 1911 - since I have a few 9s to choose from - Even a wonderful DA/SA CZ-75B Clone. I read that 9mm reaches its maximum potential when fired from a 9" Barrel.
I have proved for my elderly self - Using my Stribog - that I am most accurate using a BRACED 9mm with "hi-lighted" iron or optic Red Dot, or Green Laser sights.
Even though NOT a high dollar inventory - I am extremely satisfied with my 9mm equipment choices.
 

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Is there any point to a 1911 9mm longslide?
Not for me, but if I were still shooting NRA Action Pistol stuff, it might be something of an advantage. I have two 5" guns now, and a 4.25", and I like all three, but the two 5" guns are range guns for me, if I'm going to pack a 5", it will be a .45. However, it really doesn't matter too much, as I like them all too much to give them up. All are quite fun to shoot, and I wouldn't feel bad carrying one for SD, though that LW Ronin would make me happier.
I also shoot the .38 Supers, and like them heaps and heaps, but mine are both 5", and I haven't gotten around to scrounging up a Commander Super barrel yet. Maybe one day..................
 

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I could shoot the Colt & Walther all day without any discomfort, but that Glock recoil somehow sends some of the recoil to my trigger finger. Glock has had 30 years to fix this, & yet it persists. In a self-defense situation, the shooting would be over before I would notice the small discomfort, but it is more annoying at the range. When Colt starts shipping its Defender 9mm in stainless, I will probably upgrade from the Glock. The Springfield Arms 9mm EMP looks nice, but some of the reports scare me.

I carry the Colt in some scenarios, & the Glock in others.
The grooved Glock trigger is terrible in those smaller guns. It isn't hard to swap the trigger shoe on the 43x to one of the smooth gen 3/4 trigger shoes from a 17/22. You have to carefully push the pin that holds the shoe on the trigger bar very slightly deeper to make a bulge on the opposite side where there is no hole. Then drill a very small hole in the bulge to push the pin out....I think I just used a small punch the last couple times to punch through the bulged plastic to pop the pin out without drilling. Do this to both triggers and swap the shoe...the original pin will press right back in and stay snug if you do it correctly.

This helps a lot more with the trigger bite than you'd expect and at worse you are out a few $8 triggers if you mess up.
 

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The grooved Glock trigger is terrible in those smaller guns. It isn't hard to swap the trigger shoe on the 43x to one of the smooth gen 3/4 trigger shoes from a 17/22. You have to carefully push the pin that holds the shoe on the trigger bar very slightly deeper to make a bulge on the opposite side where there is no hole. Then drill a very small hole in the bulge to push the pin out....I think I just used a small punch the last couple times to punch through the bulged plastic to pop the pin out without drilling. Do this to both triggers and swap the shoe...the original pin will press right back in and stay snug if you do it correctly.

This helps a lot more with the trigger bite than you'd expect and at worse you are out a few $8 triggers if you mess up.
What I did, was (gun empty) to put one finger behind the trigger so it could not move. Then I pressed the trigger safety in with another finger until it could not move. The visible part of the safety represents plastic that I need to remove from the trigger safety, that is the plastic that is pressing against my finger when the gun fires.

I took a small/tiny round file & carefully removed that plastic, checking every few moments to see that I not taken off too much. If you take off too much, the gun will be "too safe"; that is, it will not fire! The goal is that when you depress the trigger safety with your trigger finger, the remaining trigger safety under finger pressure is just flush with the trigger surface. Stop there!

The effect is that when shooting, the trigger safety is depressed exactly the same distance as before. The only difference is that extra plastic that was pressing into your trigger finger is gone, & your trigger finger is resting on the entire trigger, not just an annoying part of it.

When you remove your finger from the gun & view the trigger & the trigger safety from the side, you should see that the curvature of the trigger safety, matches the curvature of the trigger.

For those concerned about liability, one side effect of doing this, is that the gun is actually marginally safer from an AD. There's less material of the trigger safety to catch on anything.

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However, you suggestion of a different, flat trigger is one that I will continue to consider. One probably cannot have too many Glock triggers! :)
 
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