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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How much less is the lifespan of a modern .40 (not .45) pistol compared to a modern 9mm?

There's the Glock 17 in 9mm and the Glock 22 in .40, for example. S&W makes the M&P in both 9mm and .40 the last I checked. I think Sig makes both polymer and steel/aluminum pistols in .40. There was the CZ 75 in .40 but the don't make them anymore. I don't recall is Springfield makes their polymer guns in .40 anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If magazine availability were the barometer, .40 Smith has lost favor.
As far as longevity. I know of zero examples of people having to be worried about wearing out a firearm.
I guess it is moot because even the .40 pistol will last longer than the number of rounds a person will shoot through it.

IIRC, when the .40 cartridge was first gaining popularity, there were some guns that wore out. I guess that was due to manufacturers using almost the same exact gun for .40 as they have been using for 9mm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
How much less is the lifespan of a modern .40 (not .45) pistol compared to a modern 9mm?

There's the Glock 17 in 9mm and the Glock 22 in .40, for example. S&W makes the M&P in both 9mm and .40 the last I checked. I think Sig makes both polymer and steel/aluminum pistols in .40. There was the CZ 75 in .40 but the don't make them anymore. I don't recall is Springfield makes their polymer guns in .40 anymore.
In the original post I should have added possible choices like the .40 pistol will last half as many rounds fired as the 9mm. Or one-third as many rounds, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Asking this question is like asking your doctor how many cheeseburgers you can eat before you get heart disease. The answer is, it depends. There are far too many variables to put any kind of realistic number on it. All else being equal a .40 will beat itself to death before a 9mm will, but then again how many people do you know who have ever worn out a handgun of any sort?
I haven't known any but I know it did happen when the .40 was gaining popularity.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I think it first depends on if the gun is built around the 40 caliber or originally a 9mm bored out and modded to shoot 40. IME, most 40cal guns are designed around the 180gr round. Shooting something hotter like a 165gr round can definitely stress and break parts more frequently. At one point I broke practically every part on my issued G22 shooting Speer 165 GD, except the barrel. It was sent back to Austria at their request and they came back with….stop shooting the Speer, it was designed to shoot 180gr.
Interesting. I didn't know most .40 guns were designed around the 180gr bullet.

I never heard of a manufacturer telling a gun owner to avoid certain grain bullets except for very light bullets through a .357 magnum revolver. What generation was your G22?
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
...My SWAG is if you shot a constant diet of NATO 9mm +p+ and 40, the failure rates would be similar because you’re basically shooting two rounds that are loaded to max SAAMI specs/pressures.
The latest NATO 9mm rounds (which use flat nose, 115gr bullets) are the equivalent of commercial +P+ rounds? I thought they were +P, though I remember thinking the listed velocity was high.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
The .40 is certainly more intense, but then again most .40 autos have a much heavier recoil spring and a few (as I recall) have a more massive slide. AS noted by more than one person above you would have to WORK at it to wear out a modern semi-auto by shooting it. I remember reading some years back about a Glock 17 that had a million rounds thru it with zero breakage. I don't know if they have done that with a .40 or not. The NYPD test for approval was 10,000 rounds.
I knew the Glock 17 was good for 100,000 rounds, but not 1 million. They probably did preventive maintenance on it like new barrels and other parts.

FWIW, the NYPD does use +P ammo, the last I heard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
I think a good side by side would be comparing longevity between the Glock 22 and the S&W M&P in 40. As I understand it when the the >40S&W was announced Gaston rushed to get the 22 out and simply increased the bore size on the Glock 17, whereas the M&P was designed around the 40S&W.
The Gen 4 Glocks in .40 were specifically made for the .40 round from what I read. I guess that means the comparison would need to between the Gen 4 Glock and the M&P.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Yeah, It's a little on the snappy side and starts to suck to slightly unpleasant after around 150 rounds or so. But easily manageable, and still fun on range day if you're not going for high round counts. You can still find used police trade-in .40s on the cheap from time to time. My LGS seems to knock a lot off the price of .40 S&W anything, so used .40 S&W are often particularly cheap. I was kind of on the fence about the round until I fired it out of a 1911, it's a whole other animal out of a gun with a heavier slide that's hammer fired. Kind of has a push like a .45 ACP.
I've seen .40 trade-ins for $329. They were M&P models. Glocks go for more than that, from what I saw. I never priced them at the LGSs, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Or track Glock Generation changes.

The .40 S&W was introduced in the Gen 2 guns.

The Gen 3 guns added an additional cross pin for more rigidity. Probably specifically for the .40 S&W guns.

The Gen 4 guns got a dual recoil spring to help with the .40 S&W guns. This caused problems with the early Gen 4 9mm guns.

The Gen 5 .40 S&W guns now have a thicker slide.

Glock is probably on Gen 5 only because of the problems they've had with the .40 S&W guns.
I heard about the thicker slides on Gen 5 Glocks but don't know whether that is just for the .40.

Gen 5 also got rid of the finger grooves.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
...I get the feeling, if you want to shoot .40 S&W out of a Beretta handgun, Beretta would rather you chose a PX4 or APX, guns designed around the .40 S&W round.
I didn't know the PX4 was designed around the .40. Are you sure?

The PX4 uses a polymer feed ramp, last I heard. I also heard it wears out fast when using other than ball ammo. I'm guessing they don't have a life time warranty. Nevertheless, they get good reviews. I wonder why they haven't sold really well. Maybe because it isn't striker fire.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
In the original post I should have added possible choices like the .40 pistol will last half as many rounds fired as the 9mm. Or one-third as many rounds, etc.
Where does this half as many or 1/3 as many come from?
In other words, if a 9mm will last 90,000 rounds, will a .40 last 45,000 rounds, or 30,000 rounds. I know it is difficult to tell and thus speculation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
There were some teething issues with some .40 models that were based on the older 9mm frames. BHP was a good example, many of the early .40 models were cracking the forged frame. Browning changed to an investment casting and the cracks quit happening, so much for the myth that forged frames are stronger. Browning had already strengthened the .40's action with a thicker slide and extra locking lug as part of its upgrade from the 9mm version. Only the decrease in .40 popularity (and decrease in sales) stopped the .40 BHP production...
I was disappointed when the .40 BHP was discontinued. They had 10 round mags which I think made them excellent guns for states that banned hi-cap mags. The new FN one only comes in 9mm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Yes.


Polymer coated, and there is almost no contact with the ramp as the rounds feed nearly directly into the chamber...
One LEO claimed he was on his 3rd PX4 due to the feed ramp getting chewed up by hollow points.
Yes.



Polymer coated, and there is almost no contact with the ramp as the rounds feed nearly directly into the chamber.


I've never heard that. Since the guns were designed to shoot hollow point ammunition, that seems very unlikely.
One LEO claimed he was on his 3rd PX4 due to the feed ramp getting chewed up by hollow points.
 

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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
This never really made sense to me. If I can have a gun that equally suits my needs, but the ammo is noticeably cheaper and the lifespan is double to quadruple the number of rounds...why would I purposely choose the more expensive option? Why would I set myself up to have to buy parts or a new gun (or two) when I could just shoot more?

I have worn out a few guns...I don't buy any more of those guns.
A person may like the more expensive option.

Many, including myself, would like to know which guns you wore out and about how many rounds it took to wear it out.
 
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