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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I bought 1000 LRN 124gr and neither Lymans nor the published Hodgon data which I have shows data for a 124gr bullet. Lymans has 120gr and Hodgon has data for 120gr (and 125 but don't recognize the bullet type listed) . I could go down 2 grains from the starting load of the 120gr for either powder and be safe right? Looks like at worst it will put me in the middle of the load range for a 124gr.

Now a bigger question. I prefer LSW bullets from for 9mm and ordered the 9mm LRN as a starter order with Alpha Bravo to go with my first order of 45 ACP from them.

I'm looking for a inexpensive (ok cheap) 9mm LSWC in a common gr to match with Bullsye and Titegroup powders. Any suggestions?

Thanks for your help.
 

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My favorite LSWC in 9mm is a Lee TL-356-124-TC that i cast and tumble lube. The mold is sold for $19 and will give you a life time of bullets. This cast is great for plinking and target shooting with 4.9 of BE or Unigue. My wife like them becouse of the low recoil she gets in her G-17.
 

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I cast the MP round nose hollow point for the 9mm, it's the best flying 9mm I have ever shot, and is very accurate at every velocity I have pushed it to.
 

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Lead bullet loads for 124

For accuracy, I load the lead 125-122 FP from Space Coast or Extreme (anyone that has this bullet shape is ok). Here is the Extreme bullet:
http://www.xtremebullets.com/9mm-122gr-FP-p/x9mm-122fp-b0500.htm
I use 3.6-3.7 gr of Titegroup or 3.8-4.0 of 231 and get good accuracy. I load to 1.075" OAL and use a light crimp...too much and you pinch the bullet and accuracy is not good! I was shooting this load today and shared some with a guy next to me and he was "WOW!" If you are using a progressive press, keep your stroke consistent and you will enjoy good accuracy. I am a commercial remanufacturer and have had my 147 gr subsonic match loads chronyed and got 10 fps or less variation between shots. A customer did it independently and I was amazed! Olympic match air guns get low spreads like that!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Thanks so much Cliffspot. My OAL on a round nose has been about 1.150 based on matching the OAL of a factory FMJ I compared to. Others who quote LRN's are going much shorter than I am - wondering if that presents an issue?

I haven't received my LSWC yet but will use your data on OAL and Titegroup for sure. (For what its' worth MO Bullets has a similar bullet to your xtreme for $32 for 500 vs $47 from Xtreme.)

That's a big heads up on the crimp - I never knew how much impact that has had on accuracy. I've been loading 45 ACP up till now and just started 9mm. I set the crimp/ bullet diameter width on the 45 LSWC and 9mm to match factory rounds.

Do you have a target diameter I should look for on a completed round for the 45 ACP and the 9mm when done with LSWC - bullet diameters (from MO Bullets used) .452 and .356 respectively?

Thanks again.
 

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Bullet shapes and chamber throats differ so much it is hard to get a "recipe" for cast bullets in autopistols, especially 9mm.

The only reliable way I know is to put your gun barrel beside the loading press and adjust OAL until a seated and taper crimped round will chamber freely. I think longer is better, but it must chamber, fit the magazine, and feed to be usable.

I am at present loading a 125 gr conical from BBI at 1.145". It will chamber in my SA and Colt but will not pass an EGW gauge which does not have a throat to accept the bearing surface showing.

I load plated and jacketed roundnose with the same seating die setting and get 1.15" which does gauge because the ogive tapers all the way back to the case mouth.
 

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Here are some pics (I hope!)

These are 124 9mm round nose. notice how much of the shoulder is sticking out of the case. If you load auto pistol rounds with lead bullets that have a shoulder, this is how much you should have outside. My boss said a thumbnail thickness. Drop a loaded round in your barrel to make sure it turns freely. Too much shoulder exposed will hit the chamber ledge and you will have problems...slide might not close all the way, higher pressures, inconsistency will destroy accuracy. I also included some 380 lead to show how it should look. My 45 SWC look the same. I have no conicals loaded, maybe this week if I have time....356 and .452 are standard for lead and you should be ok with that. I have shot .356 lead in 38 specials and have gotten good accuracy from that even though they are SUPPOSED to be .358....it's called obturation or bullet upset. GOOGLE brah!
http://forums.1911forum.com/attachm...708008?attachmentid=108363&stc=1&d=1384707581
 

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The chamber of the gun is the only way to tell maximum OAL. Do the plunk test.

Note that all round nose bullets of a given weight do not have the same profile. Some have a distinct taper and some are more blunt on the business end. The blunt ones need to be seated deeper.

Also not all LRN have a distinct shoulder to go by.

Bill
 

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>I haven't received my LSWC yet but will use your data on OAL and Titegroup for sure.

Don't just use any one's data unless you work up to it or it is a starting load or less in your manuals.
Different bullets take different COL. Different guns take different COL.
For SWCs, you want about 1/32" of the shoulder sticking up. I set COL for lead bullets such that the bullet is just touching the rifling/lede for minimum headspace. For L-RN, I find that most work well at 1.150".
For L-TC (which is available almost from any commercial bullet caster), I find that 1.130" works well--other find that 1.100" is what works for them.
For L-SWCs, I find that 1.075-1.120" works well, depending on the ogive of the bullet (which varies quite a bit from different sources and particularly different molds). It all depends though on the throat in YOUR gun. COL is dependent on the bullet shape, the magazine and when it releases the round, the feed ramp, and the barrel's chamber. Most of these are GUN dependent, so you need to determine what works best for you and your gun(s).
Different guns like different powders. I have not had any great success with lead bullets and TG. 231/HP38 is much better.
For light loads, I prefer 231/HP38, AA2, AA5, and Solo 1000.
For near max performance, Power Pistol is far and away the best powder for my 9x19s, with Silhouette second best.
Remember: all bullet brands are different (unless they come from the same mold or swage die) and all have a small range of COL where they work best, and that COL does not carry over automatically to any other bullet.
If you want top performance, COL can make a difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I will do the plunk test, which I just learned about yesterday. BTW, I struggle with some cartridge and pistol landmark terms so I apologize not knowing the correct term.

If I understand the plunk test, all diameters and OAL need be set to allow the bottom of the cartridge (term?) to allow proper headspace in the barrel (flush with or slightly below _ _ _ _ term(?) ).

So in my understanding the plunk test determines the max allowable OAL, which if you are using different barrels like I do for 45 acp, it needs to be the shortest of the different barrels max OAL. For 9mm only 1 barrel will be used so I can maximize accuracy by headspace flush with _ _ _ _ (term?) or a couple thousandths below _ _ _ _ (term?)
 

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So in my understanding the plunk test determines the max allowable OAL,
Yes, the plunk test helps determine the max. OAL, but it does much more than that. It also helps determine when you have the "right" amount of crimp and if you have any lube or lead smeared on the case, which would cause feeding problems.

Very valuable test. :)
 

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Have you determined if SWC will feed in your gun? I have one 9mm that doesn't like anything but round nose, and another that doesn't care what shape the nose is except for wadcutters.

Good example of the importance of finding/determining a load before you buy components. Check your manual for the size/type of bullet you'd like to use, see if you have or can get the powder listed, then buy bullets...
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks guys, brooklyn everything shoots better than me :)

Good advice mikld but don't have lswc to test. I'm not shooting IDP and don't carry a 9mm so it'll work (polish feed ramp, play with OAL's etc.). As to published data, I've found a powder for 45acp that was only published in one spot (that didn't yield easily to google) yet guys on this forum were using it quite happily and successfully.

The plunk test showed that in my new 9mm Springfield 1911 all my dummy round OAL's (1.134-1.160) were great with no change by reducing the diameter -.002 from what's currently set. I feel I'm good on 9mm as this is the only 9mm used with cast for targets.

However in the first 45acp barrel tested, there's an OAL restriction below 1.251 needed - and that reducing diameter -.002 does not negate the OAL restriction. Therefore the current die set for OAL 1.255 needs to be reduced.
 

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I cast and load the H&G #275 09-125-SWCBB sized .357 over a moderate charge of BlueDot or Accurate #7. The bullet is seated with about 1/32 of the shoulder showing above the case mouth. Loaded on my Dillon SDB.

This loading works perfectly in several 9mm pistols. BHP, Tanfoglio, SA XDM, S&W M&P, and even a KelTec PF-9!

This bullet also makes a nice plinker for38 Super and 38 Special.
 
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