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Is there a list out there who makes what major assemblies (mainly frame, slide, and bbl) for whom, in the 1911 market? Something like,

1. Colt makes its own frames and slides, for itself.

2. S&W makes its own frames and slides, and makes same for $FILL_IN_THE_BLANK.


D.
 

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If I remember correctly..

Kimber gets their castings from S&W.

Springfield's guns start in Brazil.

I thought I had heard that Caspian supplied Dan Wesson, but not really sure.

I haven't got a clue about the semi-customs.
 

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I suspect that who makes what for whom changes rather frequently in the gun industry, and the various manufacturers, with a few exceptons, aren't too keen on letting us consumers or their competitors in on very much.
 

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Forged slides and frames or slide and frame forgings?
There is a lot of difference.

I think hjk is correct. They don't want you to know just how little of their guns are actually manufactured in-house; and they change suppliers according to price and specification as suits them. There can be no definitive list, it would be different next month.
 

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How about this, if you're going to spout off about who makes what for who, then provide a source.

It gets really tiresome to see the same old "this guy makes that" with absolutely no reference, espcially when 9/10 times the information posted is wrong.

If you can't back up your "facts" then they're really just rumor and conjecture.
 

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As noted, please actually know something before posting that "X comes from Y." :rolleyes:

Some obvious stuff:

Kimbers have forged frames & slides; they don't get "castings" from anybody.

There is a big distinction between getting forgings from somebody, and having them deliver you finished frames/slides.

Caspian's info is easy, since they list alot on their website, http://www.caspianarms.com/index_receivers.htm

Caspian's cast frames are machined from heat-treated blanks of steel supplied by Ruger's Pine Tree foundry. Their barstock frames are made from heat-treated billets of plate steel, but they don't name the source of the billets. Their slides are machined from heat-treated billets. Their titanium frames are cast CP titanium, and the steel alloys they use are 4140, 4130 and 4340 carbon steels, and 410 Stainless.

Colt indeed makes its own forged frames and slides, and has done so pretty much forever... contrary to rumors that they used cast frames during the 1990s.
 

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Jim Watson said:
Forged slides and frames or slide and frame forgings?
There is a lot of difference.

I think hjk is correct. They don't want you to know just how little of their guns are actually manufactured in-house; and they change suppliers according to price and specification as suits them. There can be no definitive list, it would be different next month.
According to Bob Serva, President of Dan Wesson....the source of their slides and frames is Smith & Wesson. What percentage of their slides and frames and or forgings are finished by Dan Wesson or Smith & Wesson I have no idea. Except for a few differences, Dan Wesson's finished Patriot slides and frames look nearly identical to the SW1911.

Regards,
Sam
 

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I read at one time Wilson got some things from S&W but I do not know if that is the case anymore or not.

There was an article in one of the magazines several years ago about S&W's manufacturing operations other than gun making. You would be surprised at the number of different things they make & for whom.

O2B.
 

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S&W provided raw forgings for Kimber. Kimber than machined those forging for themselves and Wilson. Wilson has their slides and frames machined oversized for handfitting.
 

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After the first of the year, Wilson will begin buying the rough forgings DIRECTLY from S&W (instead of from Jericho who got them from S&W) and will begin CNC machining them IN HOUSE, instead of Jericho machining them for Wilson (TO WILSON's specifications).

from the horse's mouth...

Steve
 

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SteveW13 said:
After the first of the year, Wilson will begin buying the rough forgings DIRECTLY from S&W (instead of from Jericho who got them from S&W) and will begin CNC machining them IN HOUSE, instead of Jericho machining them for Wilson (TO WILSON's specifications).

from the horse's mouth...

Steve
Maybe then they'll offer the option of no front cocking serrations.
I hope.
 

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SteveW13 said:
After the first of the year, Wilson will begin buying the rough forgings DIRECTLY from S&W (instead of from Jericho who got them from S&W) and will begin CNC machining them IN HOUSE, instead of Jericho machining them for Wilson (TO WILSON's specifications).

from the horse's mouth...

Steve
Jerico went bankrupt years ago... Replace 'Jerico' with 'KMI' (or Kimber Manufacturing Inc.) ;)
The Ultimate 1911

The Government Model industry was shaken to its core by the introduction last year of Kimber's 1911. Priced at a mere $625...

...How Kimber, a name associated with high grade hunting rifles, came to be in the 1911 business requires a little history lesson.
The story begins in Yonkers, N.Y., with a company called Jerico Precision which was founded in 1978 as a manufacturer of hand tools and a subcontractor for various defense industries.
The name Jerico comes from founders Jerry Roman and the late Richard Brown, an acronym for "Jerry and Richard's Company."

...Jerico needed two things: a market and somebody who knew about 1911's.
The help they found turned out to be businessman Leslie Edelman, owner of a major firearms and accessory wholesale
company called Nationwide Sports, and Chip McCormick who knows something about 1911s. At the time, Edelman was a minority shareholder of Kimber Of America and his plan was to connect Jerico's manufacturing capability with Kimber's established dealer network.
The project began in the winter of 1994 and the prototypes of the "Kimber" pistol were shown at the 1995 SHOT Show.
Controversy swirled around the sample at the show, which were in fact made by Caspian Arms with the serial number and
manufacturer's identity hidden under the grip panels.
Then in late 1996 Edelman purchased Jerico and changed the name to Kimber Manufacturing. In April, 1997, Edelman closed Kimber's riflemaking facility in Oregon and moved the entire operation to Yonkers.
That's the history of how the Kimber 1911 came to be...

~ American Handgunner Sept/Oct 1997
This article was supplied by an employee of Kimber. Click here to read the entire article

edited to add article link
 

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It is quite common within the industry to obtain parts and even assemblies from other gunmakers. Manufacturers will often put out bids to other companies to compete with their own company. More common than you would imagine.

I was on a tour of the Remington plant in the mid 90's I saw racks of revolver frames that Remington was working on for another manufacturer. And their shotgun barrel machine was making barrels for Mossberg!

I many cases a company may obtain work from their competition to keep their workforce and expensive machinery working. If they have invested a lot of capital in a certain piece of equipment they would want to keep it producing to keep a healthy bottom line.

If you could trace back every part in your gun to its original manufacturer you would probably be amazed.
 

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The only one i know is that Sig Arms gets their GSR frames and slides from Caspian...other than that im not getting involved...
 
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