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Discussion Starter #1
I fear this may require a tutorial on the function of triggers, but I am wondering what makes one trigger better (more crisp/smoother/pick an adjective) than another.

I would imagine it has something to do with how the various internal parts match up to one another. If that's the case though, would it not be possible to polish thos parts to smooth a trigger rather than change the whole thing?

Thanks.
 

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At the core, it is simply a factor of two metal parts rubbing against each other under pressure. When we throw the "feel" into the pot, along with the need to disturb the aim as little as possible, things can get complex.

In the 1911 type, the trigger and the sear are separate. The main part of a "good" trigger pull involves the engagement of the sear with the hammer. For safety, the engagement has to be sufficient for the sear to hold the hammer cocked until deliberately disengaged. At the same time, the disengaging movement must be short, positive, and without erratic movement (creep) which would disturb the aim.

You are right to some extent that polishing the existing parts will improve trigger pull, sometimes dramatically. But the standard parts in a 1911 do not always lend themselves to better trigger pull, and that, plus other factors, leads to use of special parts that are better for the purpose.

Another point is that even where polishing would be sufficient, many people do not have the expertise to do it properly and without doing damage to the parts. For those folks, it is easier to just swap in parts that already have the fitting and polishing done.

One problem is that while the parts makers advertise these parts as "drop in", meaning no fitting is required, they often are not, and the amateur is faced fitting them, a task requiring skill he does not have. Yet another problem is that the "standard" specifications, those to which millions of military pistols were produced, have not been held to by all makers. So both the parts maker and the parts installer are faced with "out of spec" guns or other parts.

HTH

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you so much for taking the time to answer my question. After years of shooting, I am beginning to desire an understanding of the inner workings of firearms that goes beyond the ability to define Single Action and Double Action.
 

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I suggest you get yourself a copy of Jerry Kuhnhausen's book "The 1911 .45, a Shop Manual". It'll tell you 'nearly' everything you want to know about how the 1911 works...as well as some things you can do to improve it.

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'll look into it. Thanks for the recommendation. Good reference books are always a welcome addition to the library.
 
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