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This is the post I'm talking about: http://www.1911forum.com/ubb/Forum11/HTML/000014.html
It is really good reading, there are so many things related to accuracy he touches there. I was thinking about the following: "Proper griping of the pistol is a very important aspect of shooting a pistol for consistent function and accuracy. One reason pistols are more difficult to shoot than rifles are because they are lighter. There is more movement under recoil; this is why a uniformed grip (shooting platform) is very important."
This is true for all pistols, but even more so for magnum revolvers. Most pistols don't fire very powerful rounds, and they transfer a "cushioned" recoil to the hands. The bullet has left the barrel before much recoil is felt and generally the grip is pretty high (closer to the bore line), diminishing the effects of torque.
On the other hand, magnum revolvers are more powerful, they don't cushion recoil well, and the grip is lower (further from the bore line) generating more torque on the hands. As a result, recoil and muzzle climb are more noticeable before the bullet leaves the barrel.
Take a look at any magnum revolver (the more powerful the better) and you'll see that the front sight is higher above the bore line than the rear sight. This is, if you are shooting at a target that is at the same level of your gun, the gun is actually pointing down when you align the sights.
For example, my 6.5" 44mag S&W revolver has the front sight about 0.035" higher above the bore line than the rear one, when zeroed at 100 yards firing a 240gr. bullet at 1250 fps. When I'm aligning the sights on a level range, it is pointing downward about 14 MOA (minutes of angle), wich translates to 14" low at 100 yards (imagine a laser beam through the bore line). Now, this load has a drop of about 12.7" at 100 yards, so if the gun is zeroed at this range the barrel is actually pointing 12.7 MOA upwards at the moment the bullet leaves the barrel. This means that at the moment of firing, while the bullet is still is the barrel, my hands are rotating up in an 26.7 MOA arc!!
My grip has to be very consistent, and most probably somebody else griping the same gun differently (higher/lower, more or less grip force) will have a different point of impact.
 

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Originally posted by TiroFijo:
This is the post I'm talking about: http://www.1911forum.com/ubb/Forum11/HTML/000014.html
It is really good reading, there are so many things related to accuracy he touches there. I was thinking about the following: "Proper griping of the pistol is a very important aspect of shooting a pistol for consistent function and accuracy. One reason pistols are more difficult to shoot than rifles are because they are lighter. There is more movement under recoil; this is why a uniformed grip (shooting platform) is very important."
This is true for all pistols, but even more so for magnum revolvers. Most pistols don't fire very powerful rounds, and they transfer a "cushioned" recoil to the hands. The bullet has left the barrel before much recoil is felt and generally the grip is pretty high (closer to the bore line), diminishing the effects of torque.
On the other hand, magnum revolvers are more powerful, they don't cushion recoil well, and the grip is lower (further from the bore line) generating more torque on the hands. As a result, recoil and muzzle climb are more noticeable before the bullet leaves the barrel.
Take a look at any magnum revolver (the more powerful the better) and you'll see that the front sight is higher above the bore line than the rear sight. This is, if you are shooting at a target that is at the same level of your gun, the gun is actually pointing down when you align the sights.
Consistency can be a real challenge. Considering all the variables involved when a bullet is launched from a handgun, it still amazes me that we can hit anything with precision.The fact that we do on occasion , allows much satisfaction to a great pasttime,IMHO.

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cliff
 
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