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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While I was fitting a thumb safety, reducing the radius of the frame tangs, I began sanding the tangs with long strips of sanding paper. Well, part of these strips were sanding down the top of the rear frame rails with the movement of my hands. So now I have sanded down rails that look off when the 2011 is assembled. What can I do to correct? Can I add material to the top of the rails through welding and then machine to spec dimensions? Or am I stuck with this frame?
 

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Yes, it could be welded and blended back.

LOG
 
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Log, what type of material and welding technique is recommended?
For me it would be TIG because that is what I do, if its steel then probably ER80, if SS 410. Laser welding would be a great method if you are going to have someone do it.

LOG
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
For me it would be TIG because that is what I do, if its steel then probably ER80, if SS 410. Laser welding would be a great method if you are going to have someone do it.

LOG
I wouldn’t actually be welding steel into the frame, but merely adding the welding material onto the frame and then machining it, correct?
 

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For me it would be TIG because that is what I do, if its steel then probably ER80, if SS 410. Laser welding would be a great method if you are going to have someone do it.

LOG
TIG welding is much less prone to cracking than MIG or Oxy Acetylene. Having a good copper heatsink that fits into the rail grooves would be even better. You are apt to find more good welders who have access to TIG than Laser welding equipment.
 

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I wouldn’t actually be welding steel into the frame, but merely adding the welding material onto the frame and then machining it, correct?
You can't just lay welding on top of steel without penetrating, it would just fall off. With TIG a small puddle is first created and the the filler material is added so it becomes one in the same.

LOG
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You can't just lay welding on top of steel without penetrating, it would just fall off. With TIG a small puddle is first created and the the filler material is added so it becomes one in the same.

LOG
by puddle, you mean a cavity where the filler material will be deposited? After welding, will the material be able to be parkerized?
 

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I can speak from experience that welded areas will stick out like a sore thumb after being Parkerized. Plating or coating is a better option.
 
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by puddle, you mean a cavity where the filler material will be deposited? After welding, will the material be able to be parkerized?
It will look different where the weld was applied usually. It may be better suited to Cerakote because the weld will always show through park.
 

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by puddle, you mean a cavity where the filler material will be deposited? After welding, will the material be able to be parkerized?
Not really a cavity, but the surface and down several thou is brought to the melting point and the rod is then introduced to the arc and melts into the puddle, welding.

LOG
 

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Would you all say this is merely an aesthetic issue, or are there practical consequences?
May very well not have any effect on accuracy, I would suggest you complete the build and shoot a bit before finishing, a good thing to do anyway. Then decide.

LOG
 

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I am neither a welder nor a professional gunsmith. That said, if it were mine and I wanted to repair that, I would definitely enlist the aid of a professional welder who specializes in firearms. These folks come highly recommended and have extensive experience welding on 1911s:

 

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You need to know how it shoots before you touch it. That small of a section probably makes zero difference in accuracy or function. The front end of the gun where the barrel wobbles or not in relationship to the front sight is about 90% of what matters. A loose slide along the entire rail is a problem, but a small amount of gap at the rear of the slide is probably not noticeable. The most accurate 1911 I own has a little wobble and gap like your at the rear but locks up tight around the barrel. Kind of like the ARs, where people worry about the fit between the upper and the lower. In testing we find a wobbly fit in a AR does not matter much when the gun is held then and fired.

My suggestion is shoot it. If you get under 2 inches at 25 yards, leave it alone. My 2 cents..
 
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