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My suggestion follows the idea that any repair will show unless the frame is coated. The affected area can be milled flat, creating a 'shelf' on which a piece of flat steel stock can be silver soldered and then filed to match the original shape. I've done a few solder repairs and they have held up well. Prep is the key to success.
 

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The top of the frame where it contacts the slide slots is a load bearing surface.
Reducing the bearing surface puts more load on the lower side slots.
Best to follow Log's repair advice.
 

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Well a lot of iron sights and vintage scope bases were silver soldered on with good results. Remington 700 bolt handles are silver soldered on, etc. I would imagine that would be fine if done properly.
 

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The comment I made above was to shoot it for accuracy before you started the cut and paste operation to clean up the looks. Just ran across this article on the effect of a loose slide. The 1911: Tightening The Slide (firearmsnews.com)
Here is one of his comments:
"Fitting a slide will have little effect on practical accuracy, but it should be the first step in an accurizing package when a match-grade barrel is fitted and maximum long range precision is required".
That is all I was trying to say, if you are shooting 50 yards or less, you can probably never measure any difference is the size of your groups. I had the same problem with one I built, I looked at it and just had a mental thing about it. Now, when I shoot the gun and get sub 2 inch groups always, I realize it is a mental thing with me. My suggestion is that it shoots accurately, just use it as your number one range gun and shoot the heck out of it, then build another one, just for looks. You might also not that in this article when they peen the slide they only do it at 4 points one each side before and after the magazine well. The idea is the slide does not have to ride close its entire length, only at 4 spots to ensure it is line up. Kind of like the plastic pistols that have a few metal inserts on the slide, so they are only line up at those points and free to not be every where else along the slide. Anyway, I just do not see it a problem , if it shoots OK.
 

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my recommendation. I used to use this a lot in the 70s. Engine blocks, radiators. Hell, why not a gun? 😉
 

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Whether or not the problem affects function or accuracy, I just wouldn't want to see that gap every time I held up the pistol to shoot it. I don't know about a fix for it, but if it was my pistol, it would either go or be fixed. I tend to be a stickler for appearance as well as function with my "tools" or firearms. Let us know what you decide to do, and good luck with hour decision. NV
 

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you apparently did not tape-off the other surfaces...how hard were you sanding..? this is a firearm...a "quick fix" would be a poor choice..........
 

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While I was fitting a thumb safety, reducing the radius of the frame tangs, I began sanding the tangs with long strips of sanding paper. Well, part of these strips were sanding down the top of the rear frame rails with the movement of my hands. So now I have sanded down rails that look off when the 2011 is assembled. What can I do to correct? Can I add material to the top of the rails through welding and then machine to spec dimensions? Or am I stuck with this frame?
1- YOU are the only one who can see it. 2- it's meaningful ONLY if you try to sell it and admit your were trying to play gunsmith. 3- that YOU did the 'smith work' will diminish the $$ value of the pistol anyway. that leaves 4- have a real gunsmith fix it it- pay him and chalk it up to 'cost of learning' .. IMHO it will not harm the function of the pistol
 
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Once again, have you ever looked at the rails on the stiker fired guns like the Glock? They only need to contact the frame and slide at 4 locations, 2 forward and 2 rear. Your small sanded area is just a mental thang, has nothing to do with function. Check out this pic of the Glock, the only place the top and bottom connect is at points 1 and 2 on each side, there is not even a slide at any other point on the gun. Or if the look is offensive, you can just square it up and take the same amount off the other side and just tell folks it is your custom design to prevent slide galling of binding.
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I fitted a couple of grip safeties to a pair of stainless Colt Cups some years back I got one of the hardended jigs that fastens through the safety pivot hole and then got fairly close with my bench grinder, then a file, then a diamond sharpening hone for the final close fitting. At the last it was take a few strokes, see if it would fit, then a few more strokes and repeat. As it is now there is no gap, no drag or binding, When doing something like this you need jigs or guides, and a lot of patience.
 

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Ignore what happened. Shoot and enjoy. Only a true 1911 expert will notice.
Yes, it most likely won’t affect accuracy or function but going through the trouble of building a custom gun just to be reminded of this every time you shoot it can be very frustrating. The issue is that HE will notice it.

Mistakes can take the wind out of your sails quick and make you hate something you should love.

I see both sides of it I guess. Yes, it will cost money to repair right and it doesn’t affect accuracy or function. You might consider that a waste of money.

But what dollar amount can you put on looking at something you did and being proud of it? I think it’s priceless.

Everyone screws up. It’s a learning opportunity either way, which is also priceless.
 

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You need to know how it shoots before you touch it. That small of a section probably makes zero difference in accuracy or function. The front end of the gun where the barrel wobbles or not in relationship to the front sight is about 90% of what matters. A loose slide along the entire rail is a problem, but a small amount of gap at the rear of the slide is probably not noticeable. The most accurate 1911 I own has a little wobble and gap like your at the rear but locks up tight around the barrel. Kind of like the ARs, where people worry about the fit between the upper and the lower. In testing we find a wobbly fit in a AR does not matter much when the gun is held then and fired.

My suggestion is shoot it. If you get under 2 inches at 25 yards, leave it alone. My 2 cents..
I agree. If you hadn't pointed out the oversanding, it wouldn't be noticable. Really doubtful it will affect the accuracy - it is at the wrong end of the gun.

Welding does create an inter-metallic bond, metals just don't "stick together". If you blue or parkerize, there will be a noticeable difference. 'Till you weld and cerekote or duracoat you'll have several more hundred dollars in a pistol that isn't worth any more than if you left it alone. Just my two cents' worth.
 
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I fitted a couple of grip safeties to a pair of stainless Colt Cups some years back I got one of the hardended jigs that fastens through the safety pivot hole and then got fairly close with my bench grinder, then a file, then a diamond sharpening hone for the final close fitting. At the last it was take a few strokes, see if it would fit, then a few more strokes and repeat. As it is now there is no gap, no drag or binding, When doing something like this you need jigs or guides, and a lot of patience.
The obvious take-away lesson from this thread is simple: It's gonna cost a hell of a lot more to fix this than it would have cost to have a competent gunsmith install the grip safety.
 

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The obvious take-away lesson from this thread is simple: It's gonna cost a hell of a lot more to fix this than it would have cost to have a competent gunsmith install the grip safety.
The only way to learn to build pistols is to build pistols. If you just pay other people to do it, then you are just spending money. There is pride of ownership to me the more I can do. Nobody is likely to forge their own barrels, but fitting new parts and personalizing the gun just shows more professionalism in the passion for guns. So, if there is a mistake or two along the way that just shows the guy went to the battle rather than sitting home sending someone else. And I said there is nothing to fix, it is just cosmetic.
 
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