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I think it’s funny how folks keep saying “it PROBABLY won’t affect accuracy”, LOL! Of course it won’t hurt accuracy in any way....good grief! It’s just an eye sore that bothers you. What a couple people said about Tig is the ONLY proper way to repair it. If you aren’t willing to have it Tig repaired, DO NOT try any other welding, soldering...waste of time. Just use two part epoxy like mentioned, or Thermo steel... (but Tig is the way to go).

Personally, I’d just leave it. And use it as a lesson OH YEAH..... and throw away the Dremel... I mean “sand paper”. Files or, better yet, Ceramic stones are what we use on flat surfaces. But hey, can’t ever learn if you’re not willing to mess something up along the way. So my hats off to you.
 

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I think it’s funny how folks keep saying “it PROBABLY won’t affect accuracy”, LOL! Of course it won’t hurt accuracy in any way....good grief! It’s just an eye sore that bothers you. What a couple people said about Tig is the ONLY proper way to repair it. If you aren’t willing to have it Tig repaired, DO NOT try any other welding, soldering...waste of time. Just use two part epoxy like mentioned, or Thermo steel... (but Tig is the way to go).

Personally, I’d just leave it. And use it as a lesson OH YEAH..... and throw away the Dremel... I mean “sand paper”. Files or, better yet, Ceramic stones are what we use on flat surfaces. But hey, can’t ever learn if you’re not willing to mess something up along the way. So my hats off to you.
Dave Hoback knows more about 1911 repairs than Chuck Rogers now. We truly are living in strange times.
 

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Here’s a pic of what Chuck is talking about. This is a repair that Ned Christiansen did where he cut out rail sections and silver soldered in new steel inserts. If you don’t know who Ned is, he’s an animal. And he also got the idea from Chuck…..

612668


Think about this pic next time you go about thinking that TIG is the ONLY way 🤣
 

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But... I would have another concern in taking this on. How much other stuff would you find yourself compelled to "fix" whilst this was in your hands?


Betcha I could mill a pocket each side, silver solder in a couple 'dutchmen'
then park with little to no trace evidence.
 

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An axe to grind against someone is a sick thing indeed.:rolleyes: Liars enjoy mischaracterizing people’s words.

Silver solder is just a “high temperature GLUE” for all intent & purpose. Great for making things “pretty”. So does two part EPOXY like Thermosteel!

Tig is a permanent part of the material. Which would anybody here want? Go ahead....tell me you want to take Silver Soldered components into hard use?
 

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Dave, I have no idea who you are. What axe do I have to grind? I’ve never seen your work. All I know about you is you put AR15’s together and have strong opinions that might not necessarily be based on real experience.

A silver soldered joint can be stronger than the base steel in some ways. Welding is not the ONLY way to fix this. You put it in bold so it must be true. 🤣

Since the area the OP messed up is so small, chopping out a small section of frame material and silver soldering new steel in would work out great. Low heat so the area has a lot smaller chance of getting warped and it will look great when done.

I’m sure you know some things but your delivery is like a bull in a China shop.
 

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An axe to grind against someone is a sick thing indeed.:rolleyes: Liars enjoy mischaracterizing people’s words.

Silver solder is just a “high temperature GLUE” for all intent & purpose. Great for making things “pretty”. So does two part EPOXY like Thermosteel!

Tig is a permanent part of the material. Which would anybody here want? Go ahead....tell me you want to take Silver Soldered components into hard use?
This couldn't be farther from the truth, silver solder when done correctly bonds through capillary action and will tear the material off of either of the surfaces. I certified in the silver solder process in the 60's and part of the certification required two pieces of steel to be silver solder together, they were then torn apart, one peeled off the other, to pass the joint must hold and tear the surface off the other, also a u-bend test of two pieces butt soldered together and bent on the joint, no cracking or breaking allowed. So, no. Many hydraulic lines are silver soldered and hold the pressure up to the point of a line bursting, is it thought that epoxy will do equally well?

LOG
 
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Ok. Have fun with...uhhh, all that. :)

Any FUDD’s out there... you have a good time with your silver soldered together wall hangers. I’ll continue BOLTING it together or Tig welding.
 

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You know certain silver solders can hold up to 40,000-60,000 psi right? Really high shear strengths buddy.

I think maybe you’re thinking of jewelers silver solder jobs. Again, your inexperience shows through in your posts but you’re too proud to admit you don’t know what you’re talking about Dave.
 

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I think the talented Gunsmiths on this forum could fix it for you, Don't know how expensive it would be to have it done.
It is totally cosmetic and wron't hurt the function at all.
One of the first things to lean in Gunsmithing is when to walk away and leave well enough alone.
 

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For me it would be TIG because that is what I do, if its steel then probably ER80, if SS 410. Laser welding would be a great method if you are going to have someone do it.

LOG
Log,
Does ER80 blue well and would you recommend using it to build up frame rails?
 

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Log,
Does ER80 blue well and would you recommend using it to build up frame rails?
Yes it will blue fine, it will show a slight contrast at the penetration line, common to welding and polishing of welds of carbon steel, whether blued or not.

LOG
 

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Man, I feel for you because it looks like you were doing such a good job otherwise. I've made mistakes on gun projects that made me wish I were a welder (or had enough money to start from scratch). I'm sorry, but I wouldn't know what to do other than eat it or weld it up. Log Man seems to have great welding expertise. I'd be surprised if leaving it as-is would noticeably affect accuracy or function.
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 · (Edited)
The only way to learn to build pistols is to build pistols. If you just pay other people to do it, then you are just spending money. There is pride of ownership to me the more I can do. Nobody is likely to forge their own barrels, but fitting new parts and personalizing the gun just shows more professionalism in the passion for guns. So, if there is a mistake or two along the way that just shows the guy went to the battle rather than sitting home sending someone else. And I said there is nothing to fix, it is just cosmetic.
this is my first 80% build. I’ve hand fitted 90% of components on this gun. Spent well over 30 hours spread over several months on this project. Everything was going so well. Then this happens…I was impatient and careless. I should have thought about my sanding movements. It’s purely cosmetic, but I’ll notice it every time I hold it in my hands. Goes to show just how much thought and patience is required for this kind of hobby. Thanks to all for your suggestions.
 

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this is my first 80% build. I’ve hand fitted 90% of components on this gun. Spent well over 30 hours spread over several months on this project. Everything was going so well. Then this happens…I was impatient and careless. I should have thought about my sanding movements. It’s purely cosmetic, but I’ll notice it every time I hold it in my hands. Goes to show just how much thought and patience is required for this kind of hobby. Thanks to all for your suggestions.
I did almost the same once. No big deal, and like you say it is just cosmetic. I also so filed the front sight down too much on a Uberti single action, then I learned they sell gillions of replacment blades because everybody does that, once. There is a formula you use to file fixed sights, except my numbers must have been off a little, lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #60 ·
For me it would be TIG because that is what I do, if its steel then probably ER80, if SS 410. Laser welding would be a great method if you are going to have someone do it.

LOG
Log, suppose I hire an average TIG welder, with no gunsmithing experience. What are the chances that the job will be botched and as a result, the frame dimensions will warp? Is dimension warping unavoidable when TIG welding any part of the frame? What’s the best procedure to avoid warping and/or other problems associated with TIG welding? Must the welder work fast when welding?
 
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