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Enjoyed watching the video yesterday and very much look forward to the more detailed version.
 

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Nice stuff, yes more vid's greatly appreciated... Maintain consistence btwn the relationship of the sight's and the bore axis. Makes sense...Although I am guessing that a nicely fitted slide to frame adds some value to accuracy, it pails in importance vs the barrel to slide fit...I would also guess the arrangement of a barrel mounted front sight (which one can find from a small handful of manufacturer's, option-able on an Infinity, and is also standard on a model or two of STI's), would also help the cause of maintain consistency btwn the bore-axis and the sight - can't get any more consistent - at least for the front sight anyway.
 

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You kinda sound like Chris Costa with that front sight stuff. :biglaugh:

Nice stuff, yes more vid's greatly appreciated... Maintain consistence btwn the relationship of the sight's and the bore axis. Makes sense...Although I am guessing that a nicely fitted slide to frame adds some value to accuracy, it pails in importance vs the barrel to slide fit...I would also guess the arrangement of a barrel mounted front sight (which one can find from a small handful of manufacturer's, option-able on an Infinity, and is also standard on a model or two of STI's), would also help the cause of maintain consistency btwn the bore-axis and the sight - can't get any more consistent - at least for the front sight anyway.
 

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Does anybody soft fit any more?
this is what ACW told me on an email a few months back....

You can specify your barrel fit. Standard, semi hard fit, or hard fit. I would recommend semi-hard fit on our guns. It'll be super accurate and easy to break in and manipulate.

I am assuming Standard might be considered soft fit.

Kid in college is the only reason I have not gotten one.
 

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Soft fit is what DWM did to Lugers. Soft fit, heat treat, hard fit.
I figure most places use pre-hardened stock these days, so the term is probably obsolete.
 

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this is what ACW told me on an email a few months back....

You can specify your barrel fit. Standard, semi hard fit, or hard fit. I would recommend semi-hard fit on our guns. It'll be super accurate and easy to break in and manipulate.
Would really like to hear Rob elaborate on these three levels...
 

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You want a video? :biglaugh:

Standard fit- No perceivable lockup at all. The slide operates easily but there still SHOULD be contact between both lower barrel lugs and the slide stop pin in battery. This isn't always the case though.

Semi Hard Fit- When you slowly close your slide, there can be a slight perception of your lower barrel lugs sliding over the slide stop pin into battery. This is a pretty nice condition to have. It's probably the way I would fit every barrel if I had my druthers. It yields nice accuracy and is easy for the end user to manipulate.

Standard Hard Fit- I reserve this for pistols that I have attached a guarantee of accuracy to. All of our accuracy guarantee pistols will be hard fit. The fit of the lower lugs to the slide stop pin is so tight that it takes extra effort to break the action. I do tend to hard fit to a lesser extent with a stainless barrel than I do with a carbon steel (Kart) barrel. Believe it or not, there are degrees of hard fit and some other secret techniques that go into purpose built pistols for Bullseye competition. Below is the most extreme level of hard fit that I do.

I'm going to share a very top secret bullseye trick here. I know this is going to seem a bit weird but I have mentioned in the past that I have some different tricks when it comes to attaining ultimate accuracy and often times receive some hate for not coughing up the goods. So, here's the goods.

It starts with fitting the hood. I will overcut the hood length slightly. Meaning, I cut the hood short so that it doesn't contact the breech face. I will then fit the lower lugs to the pistol very hard. I link the barrel and then break the fit in with full power ball ammunition and standard springs. (also proprietary lubrication) Once I'm happy with the lower lug break in, I will come back to the bench, weld up the barrel hood and file fit it for full contact. I use soot from a candle for marking my parts for fitting. When it comes to upper lugs and hood fits, it's the best method for marking your parts. Permanent marker is far too durable to reveal impact as opposed to abrasion. A gun fit in this manner should be able to deliver sub 1" groups out of a rest at 50 yards but it's not for everyone. Chambering such a barrel is also a super secret act. I need to have a sample of the actual ammunition you'll be using and you can't deviate when it comes to dimensions on your brass. Bullseye is all about splitting every hair you can and it's also about the shooter's confidence in the tool he's using.

Would really like to hear Rob elaborate on these three levels...
 

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You want a video? :biglaugh:

Standard fit- No perceivable lockup at all. The slide operates easily but there still SHOULD be contact between both lower barrel lugs and the slide stop pin in battery. This isn't always the case though.

Semi Hard Fit- When you slowly close your slide, there can be a slight perception of your lower barrel lugs sliding over the slide stop pin into battery. This is a pretty nice condition to have. It's probably the way I would fit every barrel if I had my druthers. It yields nice accuracy and is easy for the end user to manipulate.

Standard Hard Fit- I reserve this for pistols that I have attached a guarantee of accuracy to. All of our accuracy guarantee pistols will be hard fit. The fit of the lower lugs to the slide stop pin is so tight that it takes extra effort to break the action. I do tend to hard fit to a lesser extent with a stainless barrel than I do with a carbon steel (Kart) barrel. Believe it or not, there are degrees of hard fit and some other secret techniques that go into purpose built pistols for Bullseye competition. Below is the most extreme level of hard fit that I do.

I'm going to share a very top secret bullseye trick here. I know this is going to seem a bit weird but I have mentioned in the past that I have some different tricks when it comes to attaining ultimate accuracy and often times receive some hate for not coughing up the goods. So, here's the goods.

It starts with fitting the hood. I will overcut the hood length slightly. Meaning, I cut the hood short so that it doesn't contact the breech face. I will then fit the lower lugs to the pistol very hard. I link the barrel and then break the fit in with full power ball ammunition and standard springs. (also proprietary lubrication) Once I'm happy with the lower lug break in, I will come back to the bench, weld up the barrel hood and file fit it for full contact. I use soot from a candle for marking my parts for fitting. When it comes to upper lugs and hood fits, it's the best method for marking your parts. Permanent marker is far too durable to reveal impact as opposed to abrasion. A gun fit in this manner should be able to deliver sub 1" groups out of a rest at 50 yards but it's not for everyone. Chambering such a barrel is also a super secret act. I need to have a sample of the actual ammunition you'll be using and you can't deviate when it comes to dimensions on your brass. Bullseye is all about splitting every hair you can and it's also about the shooter's confidence in the tool he's using.
Yes it really is Rocket Science. Not for us amateurs.
Good stuff Rob.
 

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You want a video? :biglaugh:

Standard fit- No perceivable lockup at all. The slide operates easily but there still SHOULD be contact between both lower barrel lugs and the slide stop pin in battery. This isn't always the case though.

Semi Hard Fit- When you slowly close your slide, there can be a slight perception of your lower barrel lugs sliding over the slide stop pin into battery. This is a pretty nice condition to have. It's probably the way I would fit every barrel if I had my druthers. It yields nice accuracy and is easy for the end user to manipulate.

Standard Hard Fit- I reserve this for pistols that I have attached a guarantee of accuracy to. All of our accuracy guarantee pistols will be hard fit. The fit of the lower lugs to the slide stop pin is so tight that it takes extra effort to break the action. I do tend to hard fit to a lesser extent with a stainless barrel than I do with a carbon steel (Kart) barrel. Believe it or not, there are degrees of hard fit and some other secret techniques that go into purpose built pistols for Bullseye competition. Below is the most extreme level of hard fit that I do.

I'm going to share a very top secret bullseye trick here. I know this is going to seem a bit weird but I have mentioned in the past that I have some different tricks when it comes to attaining ultimate accuracy and often times receive some hate for not coughing up the goods. So, here's the goods.

It starts with fitting the hood. I will overcut the hood length slightly. Meaning, I cut the hood short so that it doesn't contact the breech face. I will then fit the lower lugs to the pistol very hard. I link the barrel and then break the fit in with full power ball ammunition and standard springs. (also proprietary lubrication) Once I'm happy with the lower lug break in, I will come back to the bench, weld up the barrel hood and file fit it for full contact. I use soot from a candle for marking my parts for fitting. When it comes to upper lugs and hood fits, it's the best method for marking your parts. Permanent marker is far too durable to reveal impact as opposed to abrasion. A gun fit in this manner should be able to deliver sub 1" groups out of a rest at 50 yards but it's not for everyone. Chambering such a barrel is also a super secret act. I need to have a sample of the actual ammunition you'll be using and you can't deviate when it comes to dimensions on your brass. Bullseye is all about splitting every hair you can and it's also about the shooter's confidence in the tool he's using.
That makes sense, appreciate the insights! May need myself one of them BE guns soon enough. W single safety in hard chrome....how nice it would be...I am looking forward to the shot show, at least I now know what I am looking at.
 

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You want a video? :biglaugh:

Standard fit...
First things first: Rob, we love you.

Second: You mean that follow-up video you promised where you talk more about barrel fitting? Yes, please. If possible, could you set it in a nice Italian restaurant over a candlelit dinner, where you talk directly to the camera about lugs and hoods and measurements in the tens of thousandths while romantic music plays? ;)

Seriously, thank you for the reply. I'm getting an ACW -- this is a fait accompli. Classic Carry. I've held out just a little to see if a compact compatible magwell might be in the offing so I could create a Classic Carry CCO with magwell.

But which barrel fit/accuracy guarantee has been the big question. This will be a do-everything gun: nightstand, carry, training and range fun. Peak reliability, durability, shootability and accuracy wanted.

I don't shoot bullseye. I know I don't need the pinnacle of barrel fitting to serve my purposes. But unless it might actually work at cross-purposes to my intended use, I just really like the idea of having maximally ideal barrel fit, and done the way you describe, it sounds like it lifts all boats -- accuracy, reliability, repeatability, durability, softer shooting, no?

You reserve standard hard fit for all the pistols you have attached an accuracy guarantee to; all ACWs have an accuracy guarantee -- either better than 1.5" or better than 1" at 25 yards. Does this mean all get some version of your standard hard fit?

What do you recommend for different applications? And for someone happy to pay for your best fit, is there any reason not to for a do-everything gun?
 

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I'm going to share a very top secret bullseye trick here. I know this is going to seem a bit weird but I have mentioned in the past that I have some different tricks when it comes to attaining ultimate accuracy and often times receive some hate for not coughing up the goods. So, here's the goods.

It starts with fitting the hood. I will overcut the hood length slightly. Meaning, I cut the hood short so that it doesn't contact the breech face. I will then fit the lower lugs to the pistol very hard. I link the barrel and then break the fit in with full power ball ammunition and standard springs. (also proprietary lubrication) Once I'm happy with the lower lug break in, I will come back to the bench, weld up the barrel hood and file fit it for full contact. I use soot from a candle for marking my parts for fitting. When it comes to upper lugs and hood fits, it's the best method for marking your parts. Permanent marker is far too durable to reveal impact as opposed to abrasion. A gun fit in this manner should be able to deliver sub 1" groups out of a rest at 50 yards but it's not for everyone. Chambering such a barrel is also a super secret act. I need to have a sample of the actual ammunition you'll be using and you can't deviate when it comes to dimensions on your brass. Bullseye is all about splitting every hair you can and it's also about the shooter's confidence in the tool he's using.
A lot goes into a Bullseye pistol that many of us, myself included don't understand and thankfully, don't have to worry about as shooters.

For a Bullseye pistol can you expand on the "Better than 1" at 25 yds" guarantee. Is that 10 shots at 50 yards, or something else, and what is the maximum group size?
Also, can you request a specific trigger pull, 3.5 or 4.0 depending on NRA or CMP use?

Appreciate the time,
J
 

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Looking at the standard features of the Prime Elite on the ACW website, it shows an accuracy guarantee of 1.5 inches at 25 yards. Would this mean that the PE is standard hard fit?
 
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