1911Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just purchased a new colt government model 1991A1 Ser 80 pistol. I bought a Wilson Drop in Beavertail, the one that does not require that the horns on the back of the frame be radiused.It seems to fit just fine, but when I started reassembaling I found that the stock hammer hits the beavertail before making it to full cock. This doesnt seem like a big problem since as a metal fabricator/welder with my own fab shop, I do have all the tools that I need to grind, and polish the hammer down to an appropriate length so that it would fit into the notch in the top of the beavertail. I guess that my real question is, since I am not a gunsmith should I try to do this,not knowing if once I'm finished doing this external fitting, will I probably run into other issues concerning the proper fit of the new beavertails interior engagement surfaces with the sear or other interior parts that I am not aware of now. I know that I can just go buy a new custom hammer and have it all installed and set up, buy I really would like to do some of my own work and really want to learn all I can about my own pistol. I like to think back to the days in the 60's when my carpenter father could buy an 06 at pay less drugs in Lewiston Idaho and after some time in his own home shop with hack saw and file in hand, could turn any military arm into a beautiful sporting rifle. The ones that I still shoot today, some 30+yrs later. Just looking for some input from people who know a whole lot more about what I would like to do, than myself. Thanks , I'm learning more all the time from this site. Blake
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
641 Posts
Powderhound:

You will most likely have to do some internal fitting on the BT grip safety, no matter how you handle the hammer issue. It's not a big deal, but it does involve detail stripping the frame and having a good idea of how the safety functions and interacts with the trigger bow, the frame and the mainspring housing. (it doesn't have anything to do with the sear.) In other words you need to know how the internals work together, which is something you seem interested in anyway. To get a good idea on what's involved in DIY 1911 smithing take a look at www.roderuscustom.tzo.com Check out the forum there as well, be aware that the site deals with non-Series 80 pistols. Also a good reference on smithing the 1911 is the first book in Jerry Kuhnhausen's series on it. Available from www.brownells.com

Some advice based on my experiences in the Wonderful World of DIY:
1) Very few "drop in" parts drop in. This is not always a bad thing, especially when dealing with safeties.
2) Go slow.
3) Be prepared for frustration.
4) Be prepared for more frustration.

[This message has been edited by LenB (edited 11-27-2001).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
372 Posts
Hi Blake , you can give me a call and I can walk you through it . You must have returned the McCormick grip safety and decided to go a less radical route than we discussed before the holidays. Take care Mike O'Hara
OCG1911
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
563 Posts
I love the "drop-in parts stuff in this forum. 1911 parts do not drop in. They are installed and if you don't know what you are doing, you may end up with the thrill of your life when you pull the trigger and let loose 7 or 8 rounds full auto. I have done this once and believe me, it was enough! When you put in a beaver tail safety, you also install a ring type hammer. This is the easy way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
318 Posts
Well, yeah, MOST "Drop-in" stuff DOESN'T, but...sometimes it DOES...IF you're lucky...
BTW, I have a Series '70 "Combat Gov't." that still has the original spurred hammer AND a beavertail--and works just fine...the beavertail was an aftermarket part sold by Colt--got it from Brownell's several years ago...aside from having to "fit" it to the trigger bow, it really DID "drop in"...I can't help but wonder if SOMEBODY...Colt, King's, SOMEBODY...doesn't still make one like that....mikey357
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top