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I browsed the Brownells catalog tonight for tools to drift the rear sight on my pistol.

The cheapest option is about $5 for a nylon punch.

The cheapest 'machine' option is about $55 for a jig-and-screw device for more precise adjustment.

Thanks for your help.

What technique/tools do you use to drift the rear sight on a 1911 for windage adjustment?
 

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THIN Brass rod and light hammer.
On a strong surface or in a vise. Add lots of care.
Jack
 

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Go to your local welding supply shop and buy a stick of 1/4 brass brazing rod. Cut a piece of the rod off about 4 inches long. Clean up the cut end, chuck your slide in a padded vise, get a medium size hammer, use your new brass punch and hammer to move the rear sight in the direction you want the bullet to go. Your done, and now you have a new tool.

Use some more of the brazing rod to make a rod about 6 inches long, use it to clear your barrel if you have a squib load. Wow, another new tool. Aint it great, and all this for less than $5.

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Because some rear sights are extremely tight and there seldom is a heavy vise at the range I purchased a Brownell "Universal Sight Tool" (#694-310-000, Page 248, Cat53). Removed the lower "channel iron" piece and now pack it in my range bag. It has nylon protective pads, Etc. which have done the job. I have used the hammer and drift method but found it difficult to control the amount of movement. By placing a pencil mark in the slot next to the sight I can visually determine the amount moved with the Brownell tool. It still requires one to learn the amount of torque required to move a tight sight but is a heck of a lot easier than a hammer. At least for me. By the way, a 1" movement to the point of impact requires a sight movement of .008". (About a half of a 64th of an inch, if you use a scale to measure the progress.) I sure didn't like dropping a hundred bucks for the tool but I'm now glad I did.

Martyu
 

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Originally posted by martyu:By the way, a 1" movement to the point of impact requires a sight movement of .008". (About a half of a 64th of an inch, if you use a scale to measure the progress.) I sure didn't like dropping a hundred bucks for the tool but I'm now glad I did.

Martyu[/B]
...at what range Marty?



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>>>>>>>>>>g2<<<<<<<<<<

I Like The Shade Too!
 

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...at what range Marty?



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>>>>>>>>>>g2<<<<<<<<<<

I Like The Shade Too!
I think .008" = 1" at 10-15 yards...

Good call on the .008" = 1inch!!!! I was hitting exactly 1 inch to the left until I read this thread and bumped my rear sight over exactly .008".
And from a rest at 10-15 yards Im now hitting the bullseye with all 9 rounds!
Perfect windage and elevation!!!


I use a brass punch and a hammer also, but I think a scale is kinda crude. I know it's not a common shop tool but when I drift sights I measure how much they moved with a .0005" dial indicator attached to a indicator base. I can't really think of a more precise way to measure the movement.
 

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Jlyons10,

Welcome to the Forum; however, it is against Forum policy to resurrect a thread over about 3 months old, unless you are the original poster. This thread is over 10 years old.

I am closing this thread to all future posts. Feel free to start a new thread on this topic if you'd like.
 
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