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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, between shooting and dry fire, I have ended up with an unpleasant callous on my thumb. Sometimes if the gun has unusually aggressive hammer texturing, the skin splits. I shoot weekly and dry fire of an evening after work. Is this normal and if so how to prevent it?
I use tools frequently and do not have 'office hands', so I am puzzled as to why this is happening.
any advice appreciated.
 

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Sorry but I only give advice on even issues every other Tuesday.

:cool:

Like pretty much everyone has said some sort of moisturizing balm/lotion is probably what you need. Gloves and maybe even moleskin on the affected digits would help also.
 

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So, between shooting and dry fire, I have ended up with an unpleasant callous on my thumb. Sometimes if the gun has unusually aggressive hammer texturing, the skin splits. I shoot weekly and dry fire of an evening after work. Is this normal and if so how to prevent it?
I use tools frequently and do not have 'office hands', so I am puzzled as to why this is happening.
any advice appreciated.
I assume you're practicing SA most of the time? Even though you use tools and your hands are fairly conditioned, the particular part of your thumb that is having the issue probably doesn't get the continual use and pressure except when you practice. Even calloused hands will blister if they don't get time to condition properly for a particular tool, such as blisters in the web of the thumb from lots of shoveling without gloves. Try some cloth adhesive tape around the thumb you cock with when you practice. If your skin is abnormally dry, use a lotion like Cornhuskers to keep it from splitting.
 

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I don't do a lot of dry firing these days ... maybe a little for new gun break-in or after trigger work. But back in my competition days (IPSC) I shot more and dry fired more. I had this same issue of "hammer thumb". I finally got tired of it and took my Dremel Tool (oh the horror!) and very slightly knocked down the sharpest areas. I didn't grind it all away or anything like that. I left it course but no longer sharp. That fixed it for me.

This was on a competition gun that already had lots of aftermarket parts and work done so it wasn't a big deal to do a little polishing.
 

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My Dad used to use Corn Huskers for the same problem in the Winter.
He said it was the only thing that he found to help his hands.
We were fishing one day, and he put it on his hands. The first cast he made after that, the rod slipped out of his hand and into the water. Had to put out more anchor and drift back to pick up the rod. Cork handles, and shallow water, helped. The look on his face was priceless. He said I guess I put too much on.
Lol
 

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If you're getting cracking of the skin, thick and hard, you probably have fungus in the skin. This is common and people who play the guitar or fiddle get this cracking. It is worse during the winter with dehydration and cold making the cracking worse with the fungus. If your finger or toenails are hard, thick, yellowed, cloudy or flaking, you have fungus in them also. The bag balm, which has lanolin (sheep's wool oil) in it is excellent for deep hydration but the fungus needs an anti-fungal cream or pill internally to clear that out. May take a while.

If you have cracking without redness or infection, you can glue it back together with super glue. Works great. If it's infected, don't do that.
 

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I usually get the same kind of cracking around my thumbs and fingers in the winter. What works best for me is a combination of superglue on the initial crack and the O'Keefe's until everything heals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
What are you shooting and what is your thumb doing?
1911 or revolver. The revolver is either a SAA clone or my model 10 SW. So thumb is thumbing hammer back.
When dry-firing the 1911 I use the hammer to recock as well...
I am wondering if it IS the colder weather. Didn't happen before.
LOL it IS the left thumb, I'm left handed!

I should try learning to use the off hand (right) thumb when shooting two handed, but i've also been practicing one handed more, so...
I do have some mechanics' gloves somewhere.
 

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1911 or revolver. The revolver is either a SAA clone or my model 10 SW. So thumb is thumbing hammer back.
When dry-firing the 1911 I use the hammer to recock as well...
I am wondering if it IS the colder weather. Didn't happen before.
LOL it IS the left thumb, I'm left handed!

I should try learning to use the off hand (right) thumb when shooting two handed, but i've also been practicing one handed more, so...
I do have some mechanics' gloves somewhere.
For now try putting a bunion pad on the hammer when dry firing.
 

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Maybe grab one of those finger condoms that replaced metal thimbles

Google: Rubber thimble

Or "Working Hands" lotion, which is sold at Wal Greens among other places. Did wonders back when my hands would split open (I am a mechanic, work where it gets cold in winter). Now that we use rubber gloves at work, and I am not washing my hands 5 million times a day, hands no longer split open.
 

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I get various hot spots...and ultimately blisters on my hands/fingers when I have very high round count sessions and particularly with 45's. A few years back I started taping my problem spots and it's worked out incredibly well. Just some added protection right where you need it without losing all the dexterity that come with gloves.

Two options to try:

This is usually my goto. Thank you rock climbers. But this tape is a cohesive tape...meaning it's doesn't adhere via glue but it sticks to itself like a cohesive bandage does. If you go this route...and trust me on this...once you've torn off the length you need, take the end and double/triple it up on itself, so you can find the damn end the next time. If you don't do this, I wish you the best of luck.


If you prefer sticky tape there is all manner of sports tape/kinesiology tape on the market at this point. I think the most famous is Rock Tape. I've been using the below and it works great for my needs...and is much cheaper. I usually use a pair of trauma shears to trim it down since it's far too wide for fingers.


 
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