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Does the 13 year old girl on my squad at the Nationals count? (She was with her Dad.)
I would guess that IDPA shooters average a bit older than IPSC competitors who do more running with their gunning. But not a whole lot. Your case seems extreme.
 

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I'd say the average age, for both IDPA and IPSC in my area, is about 40. I think there are not a lot of "young people", in the 20-30 range, because those people are in school, starting families, and careers, and don't have much time or money for a fairly expensive sport like practical shooting. I have probably seen as many young teenagers, with their dads, as young adults, for those reasons.
 

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rickb nailed it

or nobody is taking their friends/relatives to the range to be exposed to the addictive world of uspsa/ipsc. :mummy:
 

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Yes, the 50-something crowd has the time and disposable income to spend the weekend at shooting matches.

Kids are gone to college and the house is paid off. Time for a serious hobby.
 

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I'm not sure that expense really is the issue. I would imagine that for IDPA $1500 would get me all the basic stuff including a gun, magazines, belt, holster and some ammo. Most "young" people spend a lot more than that on computers and/or their cars. Infact, I daren't even tell you how much I have into my car... but suffice to say if I had gone down the gun path instead, I'd have a decent amount of firepower at my disposal :biglaugh:
 

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The age that can afford it (50+) also might be the last generation to come to know guns before they were "bad". So a lot more amenable to taking it up, or keeping up with it.
 

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At my last local USPSA match, we had a young lady still in her teens along with a couple of young men the same age. However, nearly half of us are seniors so I guess the average age would be pretty high.
 

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I'd like to get into it. Any of the competitive shooting. Not sure which one to try first or how to go about getting into it. I've read about em a bit though. I have a stock Glock 23, a SA mil-spec with a few upgrades (new to me), a Ruger P95, and a Taurus model 82 6shot revolver in .38spl. Just not sure where to begin :)
 

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RickB nailed it. Most twentysomethings are too busy with other things like family and such.

I'm 34 and still one of the youngest.

I was called nothing but "young feller" by my whole bullsye club for many years. Till they all died. :(

Ted
 

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tradition

Vermont has a shooting tradition; we have a good mix of ages.
I'll be 51 tomorrow......:rock:

For a new starter, highly recommend going to www.uspsa.org and chexcking the "club finder".

Then go, watch, ask, learn, join, and enjoy.

DON'T WAIT ANY LONGER

You'll regret having waited so long..........
 

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I think the main reason there's not a lot of young shooters competing is the cost factor.
Some clubs will give a small breaK on entry fees for a junior shooter to compete but the gear and ammo cost the same as an adult.
Some matches give no break at all on entry fees to junior shooters and I don't believe any of the organizations give a break on membership fees to the junior shooters.
This is really something that should be addressed in the shooting sports as the juniors are the future of the sport and are the ones that will most likely continue on as young adults.
Regards
Bob Hunter
www.huntercustoms.com
 

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I know for myself RickB's statement holds true. I've got the desire and probably could find the funds easily enough to compete some what regularly but time is the major issue. With a 19 month old & another one due in six months, wife, & dog time is at a premium. I've only been able to get to range once in the last 8 months. :(

O2B
 

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I think it's more of a time issue than money, as others have stated - at least for IDPA.

An IDPA match will cost my fiance and I about $75 for a match (when you figure in match fees, ammo costs and gas to get to the range - we live about 2 hours from the range). An IPSC match would run us about $120 or so (higher match fees, more expensive ammo for him - so he can shoot Major, and again the gas to get there). Once a month, that's not so bad. Start shooting 2 or 3 or 4 matches a month, and it gets a little pricey, and a little hard to justify when the bills come around.

You can get started in IDPA for under a grand (Stock Glock or CZ or somesuch and the gear to go with it - a little higher for the 1911 route). Same for IPSC Production (I think - I'm not as familiar with IPSC equipment requirements).

So, I don't think it's the money.

Figure in the time factor to go to a match and you're looking at (for me anyway) 4-5 hours in the car for the round trip, plus the 3-4 hours to shoot the match, you're talking 7-9 hours on a Saturday or Sunday. That means time that young fella can't work on his house, or play with the kids, or take his wife/girlfriend out to dinner and a movie. Weekend time is very precious to all of us, and if you have kids and other responsibilities, shooting sports will probably take a back seat to those things at least some of the time.

With the two of us, we shoot IDPA together, so I'm not jealous of his time at the range, since I'm with him. For guys who have girlfriends/wives who don't go with them for whatever reason(the gal doesn't enjoy shooting, or someone has to stay home with the kids and sitters are hard to come by... whatever), she may tend to be jealous of that time and even begin to resent him being away from her. So I can see a lot of younger fellas staying away from the shooting sports during their 20-30s until the kids are grown up at least a little more. I wish that weren't the case, but I think that's the way it is. At the clubs we shoot at, we do have a nice mix of ages, but still, most are at least mid-40s and older. There are a few younger guys, but a couple of them either just got married or bought a new house, so we seem them less often. Some take the OT on the weekends when they can get it. Some dno't come to Sunday matches anymore because of church obligations. There are a lot of reasons, and I think most come down to the time element.

Melissa
 

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It's not that simple...

One of my other interests is skydiving. Been doing that for over 15 years.

Go to any drop zone in the US and you'll find the majority of the jumpers are 35 and under. It's not a disposable income issue as a used skydiving rig is $1500 + another $1000 for jumpsuit, altimeter, helmet, etc. Figure on $1500 for the training to get you off student status. New main canopies alone can go over $2000. If you want a new rig, budget $5000 for starters. Jumps are $20 each and you never go to the DZ to do just one.

There are two things I believe that are keeping the under 40 crowd from the range.

1) Societal attitudes. To participate in the shooting sports you need a gun. Gun ownership goes against the attitudes of many in this age group. So we as gun owners, shooters, and competitors have to get to the grass roots and educate people about the facts of gun ownership and shooting. My method is to treat my competive shooting as any other sport. You may enjoy knocking little white balls into holes, I enjoy knocking little holes in cardboard. Big deal.

2) Marketing. We are horrible in marketing the shooting sports. Skydiving figured out the formula about 10 years ago and now we have a thriving industry. Many don't even know that matches exist because they never saw a flyer at the gun shop or shooting range. Even the NRA is poor about marketing. The competition list in the National Rifleman doesn't give enough info for you to pursue the details of when and where. You're interested but to check out the rulebook first, fine but you have to pay for it. It's almost like we've imposed a closed society on ourselves. Until our sanctioning bodies come up with a plan, we are the best marketers. Let the new CCW holder know that there are IDPA matches. Let the person with the 1911 know that he could have fun running and gunning in USPSA. Let the person with the Rem 870 know of a clays range. And the NRA has got to work on it's 'Olde Whyte Guy' image to attract younger shooters.
 

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It sounds like it's really a combination of Time AND Money. I know that would be the case for me and I'm 27. 1000 bucks to get started doesn't sound like much, but when you're in college, fiance, married, kids here or on the way, early in a career trying to get a solid foundation and so on.... it's a lot of money. :) I still plan to get into it. I guess I need to see where matches are held around here first :D
 

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Hank Ellis said:
One of my other interests is skydiving. Been doing that for over 15 years.

Go to any drop zone in the US and you'll find the majority of the jumpers are 35 and under. It's not a disposable income issue as a used skydiving rig is $1500 + another $1000 for jumpsuit, altimeter, helmet, etc. Figure on $1500 for the training to get you off student status. New main canopies alone can go over $2000. If you want a new rig, budget $5000 for starters. Jumps are $20 each and you never go to the DZ to do just one.

There are two things I believe that are keeping the under 40 crowd from the range.

1) Societal attitudes. To participate in the shooting sports you need a gun. Gun ownership goes against the attitudes of many in this age group. So we as gun owners, shooters, and competitors have to get to the grass roots and educate people about the facts of gun ownership and shooting. My method is to treat my competive shooting as any other sport. You may enjoy knocking little white balls into holes, I enjoy knocking little holes in cardboard. Big deal.

2) Marketing. We are horrible in marketing the shooting sports. Skydiving figured out the formula about 10 years ago and now we have a thriving industry. Many don't even know that matches exist because they never saw a flyer at the gun shop or shooting range. Even the NRA is poor about marketing. The competition list in the National Rifleman doesn't give enough info for you to pursue the details of when and where. You're interested but to check out the rulebook first, fine but you have to pay for it. It's almost like we've imposed a closed society on ourselves. Until our sanctioning bodies come up with a plan, we are the best marketers. Let the new CCW holder know that there are IDPA matches. Let the person with the 1911 know that he could have fun running and gunning in USPSA. Let the person with the Rem 870 know of a clays range. And the NRA has got to work on it's 'Olde Whyte Guy' image to attract younger shooters.

+1 I agree to this as well. It's obvious that there are a million and one reasons.
 
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