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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm interested in buying an Al Marvel jig.

What is the minimum stone length that can be used with an Al Marvel
sear jig? Is a 6" stone needed or can a shorter, 3" stone be used too?


 

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Hey Call
This is a great tool. You have good control, cutting the primary and relief angles perfect with little effort. Didn't have the problem Bigjon had, however I cranked it pretty tight. Tried the Ed Brown jig, didn't like it.
To each his own...that's why there is several types :)
And don't forget the Yavapai microscope. This is vital for viewing your cuts.

Regards,
 

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In my own personal opinion, the reason the Wilson/Brownells/Brown jig is superior at holding the sear rock solid is that the set screw that's keeping the sear from rotating is directly in line with the movement of the stone. On the Marvel, you're stoning front to back, but the jig is trying to hold the sear by squeezing its sides. To see what I'm getting at, try this: Take a sear in your hand, hold it as tight as you can by squeezing its sides between your thumb and forefinger, and then push its tip forward with your other index finger (Marvel). Now hold the sear with your thumb and middle finger, and lay your index finger up the front of the sear to support it, and try to push its tip forward with your other index finger so that your two index fingers are directly opposing one another (W/B/B). Which one feels like it holds the sear more solidly? And note that on the W/B/B jigs, the opposition is not a flexible finger but a solid set screw. On the other hand, maybe (just a guess) the Marvel is designed to let the sear slip to keep you from putting too much pressure on it. Doesn't seem right, but maybe? Dunno.

Best of luck,
Jon
 

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Nothing at all to do with what was asked.
Ah... yes. A 6" stone would be recommended as the 3" will not allow much of a stroke and slipping off isn't a good way to maintain a single plane surface.

LOG
 

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Used it on three different 1911 sears I have. I never had a problem with the sear and it came out square. Use a long stone (makes for an even, long stroke), make sure you clamp the sear tight and check your work at every pass. You don't have to put a ton of pressure down on the stone that you end up moving the sear.

Finesse-that's the word I was looking for ! :rock:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
OK, thanks for the tips. It looks like a nice jig. I have a Tom Wilson
sear jig but there's nothing wrong with more tools.
 
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