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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Has anyone used these Allen Sound Sensors? Do they live up to the claims? How do they really compare to, say, Peltor muffs?
 

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While I've never used them I do have something similiar (actually 2 sets, one custom made and one off the shelf) I don't like the off the shelf ones too much I do like the custom ones but the string between them keeps coming unnattached!:bawling:)

I do have and use Peltor electronic and Dillon electronic muffs and love them!!! Well worth the money IMO.
 

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I had a suspicion that's what you were talking about. I bought a pair earlier this year when my local gun shop guy came back from the SHOT show talking about them. Surprisingly, they actually work for me. Except after trying them, I went back to my Peltor Tac 6's because the Allen's were just too cumbersome to put on properly and keep in place during a range session, and I like having sound amplified. I keep them folded up in my range bag as back-up hearing protection.
 

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My 2 cents worth

I have something similar a few years back called a "Lee Ear Valve" N they worked... but not as well as the electronic ear units.

Prior to my retirement I worked in high noise areas where levels in excess of 120 db was not unusual. In the course of 36 years tried everything on the market. I wore hearing protection when everyone else though it unmanly, and at some point in time I have tried almost everything on the market and used it for everyday. Some I junked in the first hour, others I kept for years, and used on the range as well so here it is.

Anything you insert or leave inserted into your ear will eventually irritate it, and must be kept clean to keep a ear infection at bay. Where the electronic ear muff type are other than sweat in warm weather more comfortable over the long term, the danger of a ear infection is minimal as compared to any insert in the ear device. One more point the ear muff type will stay put when moving about far better than any over the or behind the head clip type.

If you go for the higher quality units which are stereo, you can also increase the ambient levels for us that do hear quite so well any more, but they still give close to 30 db noise reduction, which is what a good quality, (not foam) set will do.

Now before I irritate you foam plug users, read your label, 28-29 db tops and that is for the first insertion only, those are intended as a one time only, and each reuse increases the risk of ear infection, and lowers the ability to block sounds.
 

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Now before I irritate you foam plug users, read your label, 28-29 db tops and that is for the first insertion only,
I have Howard Leight foam plugs rated at NRR 33 which I think is db's. The best electronic muffs I have seen are rated at maybe NRR 26 or 27. So maybe your information is backwards...

H
 

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I have Howard Leight foam plugs rated at NRR 33 which I think is db's. The best electronic muffs I have seen are rated at maybe NRR 26 or 27. So maybe your information is backwards...

H
All the orange and yellow foam ear plugs which we used by the case were only rated at 29 db. N the over the head rubberized foam core were suppose to be rated in the 33 area, that is if you could get to fit correctly and then stay put. Some went with custom fit ear plugs, but those got dirty and wore out too quickly.

If you go with a bargain basement units well you get what you pay for, but every muff headset I have had was rated at 30 db and up, including the better electronic units, which did not fare well in a factory environment, due to the fact they only shut down when a sudden increase in noise is sensed, and not the continuous high noise level that was too often the norm.
 

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Could you point me to an electronic muff that has a NRR of 30?? I can't find one...

H
Pro Ears Pro Mag. Either 33 or 36, I forget.
 

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Thanks for the info. I did some research a few years ago and either I missed this model or it wasn't available at the time... I generally use foam plugs AND Howard Leight NRR 33 muffs. I have tinnitus and need as much protection as I can possibly get and would recommend the same to anyone especially when shooting indoors. I am interested in the electronic muffs though especially if the NRR is equal to what I am using now.

I would not recommend the Allen system for indoor use. Sound travels through the bones around the ear and skull as well and these or any foam plug alone does not offer any protection for that.

H
 

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You have to decide how much your hearing is worth
Right, so I wear plugs (nrr 33) and muffs, Peltor Comtacs (nrr 25). My hearing is very good. The Comtacs are less bulky than the Pro Ears and work well with rifles.

Part of the reason to NOT go with something like the Allen Sound Sensors is that if you do have a problem with sound leakage then you risk damage. By doubling up, shortcomings of one are offset by the other.

Muffs are known not to seal out sound as well as hoped because of such things as hair, glasses, and caps, so the plugs offset the problem nicely. You simply turn up the volume a bit on the muffs to overcome what normal conversation the plugs might otherwise block.
 

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Muffs are known not to seal out sound as well as hoped because of such things as hair, glasses, and caps, so the plugs offset the problem nicely.
This is very good info. I wish I had known about this years ago since I had been using muffs for years with glasses and they definitely caused a leak in protection. I was not aware of the issue until it was too late. The result being tinnitus. Double up and use glasses with as thin a temple piece as possible. Some shooting glasses I have seen have fairly thick temple parts, so be aware of this.
 
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