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I'm considering an ambi safety for my AR. I am left-handed, and the single-side part isn't very easy to reach or manipulate. A friend who is more interested in rifles than I am, said the ambi part interferes with the trigger finger, regardless of which side you're shooting with. Of course, if that were the case, I should be aware of it now, since the stock safety is on my trigger-finger side (but, I don't/can't manipulate the safety from a firing grip, and perhaps that's when it comes into play?). Comments? Would I be better-off to just adapt to the standard part, which is the direction I'm leaning now, in the interest of not being "dependent" on the ambi, and to avoid unintended consequences, or are the ambis the best thing since sliced bread?
 

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I would adapt. If something should happen and you pick up someone elses AR, are you going to be able to function the right side safety effectivly? Safely?

I have LMT ambi saftys on my LMT lowers and they dont interfer with me though.


Rob
 

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I have ambi safeties on my AR's. While your trigger finger will feel the switch on the left side, it's not a big deal. Getting used to it was easier than turning the gun over or using your trigger finger to engage the safety.
 

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Adapt and Overcome!

I would adapt - I did in fact. Shooting left handed is not that hard really. All I do is, when I'm walking around getting ready to shoot something, I keep my left thumb around the left side of the grip, resting on the safety. When I need to fire, I flip the selector switch, and move my thumb around back to where it belongs while presenting the rifle. It's plenty fast, easy to get used to. And no matter what AR you shoot with, it will always work. That's my $0.02

Austin
 

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I have Ambi safties on 2 of mine and a right hand safety on 1. I like the Ambi because it is faster and simpler to manipulate . But working the right handed safety as a southpaw really isn't a big deal . It just takes a little practice.

If you are worried about doing something silly when you shoot a right handed rifle I'd say skip the ambi and master the right handed safety.
 

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Southpaws and AR's

Personally i find the AR15 easy to operate lefty. Before i fired my AR i seriously considered installing an ambi safety, BUT after shooting a few hundred rounds through my new AR i have decided that there is little reason to, controls are easy nuff. Besides my fellow gunlovintexan makes a good point, world isnt going to change for us lefties, i'd familarize myself with the standard setup (right handed) and go on pulling the trigger. Enjoy the fact that the spent brass doesnt hit you like most right ejecting firearms tend to right???
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Are you using your trigger finger for these easy manipulations, or your thumb?
 

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Rick, as a southpaw I added an ambi to my M4 thinking that it would be just what the Doctor ordered. Then I found myself using my index finger to swipe off the safety. All of my carbines going forward will just have a single sided safety.
 

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That's what I've been practicing, even if it's awkward. Thanks for all the feedback.
 

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As a left-handed firer in the Army since 1984, I think I've seen just about every pro/con argument there is on this topic. Truth is, yes -- there is some operational benefit to being able to pick up any AR and operate it with the standard control set without having to re-learn or re-think anything. That said, this argument holds very little weight in real-world private use, and it really isn't much of a factor in military use, since the issued select-fire versions are never equipped with an ambidextrous selector to begin with.

We all learned to adapt at one point or another. That's a given, but as a southpaw, I'm pretty tired of constantly "adapting" to tools that were/are designed for right-handed operation. If it's my own personal rifle, and I'm the one that is going to benefit, then the real question here is why on earth wouldn't I fit an ambidextrous safety, just as I've done with all of my 1911s?

For my purposes, the issue isn't "is an ambi safety warranted?" since I believe the inherent convenience and practicality arguments speak for themselves; the issue is whether or not the double-sided selector in question was/is really a quality part. In the old days, that was always something of a hit or miss proposition, but with top shelf firms like LMT on board, those worries have long since past.

Do as you wish, but for whatever it may be worth, I've spent 30+ years of my personal and professional life using these rifles in virtually every permutation imaginable, and whenever a new Colt AR is introduced to my gun locker, a selector change is never far behind.
 

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Mmmmmm, food for thought. I have what is supposed to be a LMT on my desk, on loan from a friend. It looks like it was pieced together from a number contractors. The lever on the left side, and the shaft, have a smooth black finish, while the lever on the other side is a rough, cheap-looking casting with a spotty gray coloring. I saw a RRA ambi at a local gun store, and it looked, at least, like a higher-quality part. If LMT is the best, and I go the ambi route, I'll probably test with the suspect one I have, and then buy a new one.
 

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Having an ambi safety for a left hander, if the shooter is using a tactical sling of some sort, the right side of the rifle will be resting against the shooter's chest/chest rig/vest, etc. The safety could inadvertently gets flipped to the fire position. Something to think about.
 

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Mmmmmm, food for thought. I have what is supposed to be a LMT on my desk, on loan from a friend. It looks like it was pieced together from a number contractors. The lever on the left side, and the shaft, have a smooth black finish, while the lever on the other side is a rough, cheap-looking casting with a spotty gray coloring. I saw a RRA ambi at a local gun store, and it looked, at least, like a higher-quality part. If LMT is the best, and I go the ambi route, I'll probably test with the suspect one I have, and then buy a new one.
I have a CMT/Stag on mine and it is a quality part. That star on the end of the RRA is a real PITA.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
the rifle will be resting against the shooter's chest/chest rig/vest, etc. The safety could inadvertently gets flipped to the fire position. Something to think about.
Wouldn't that be true for a right-hander and the standard safety?
 

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Having an ambi safety for a left hander, if the shooter is using a tactical sling of some sort, the right side of the rifle will be resting against the shooter's chest/chest rig/vest, etc. The safety could inadvertently gets flipped to the fire position. Something to think about.
As RickB points out, a righty would have the same issue, if it was a problem.

I have an ACE buttstock and recently mounted a center-point sling from GG&G, attached to the front of the stock on the right side where it adjoins the lower. I've carried it for hours in the field on three different occasions. The ambi safety has not caught on anything, and I suspect the folks that have marketed single point slings have determined that the force necessary to move the safety lever to "Fire" simply cannot be generated by the incidental contact between the rifle and the shooter when it is hanging free.

I suppose such force could possibly be generated with contact created by running, jumping, or other strenuous movement while the rifle was hanging free. But if my experience is any indicator, the instinct for self-preservation would prevent that. One would not embark upon such movements without automatically first using one or both hands to secure some part of the rifle (forearm, stock, carry handle/scope) in order to prevent injury.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I'm sure you've all been holding your breath, while I decided what to do. I'm staying with the stock safety. I discovered that the ambi required me to move my trigger finger, opening my grip, to allow the safety to rotate down into the fire position. Since I have to move my trigger finger either way, ambi or no, I might as well use it to flip the safety off.
 

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I'm happy that this issue has been resolved. A terrific burden has been lifted!

Seriously though - try using your thumb. I know it sounds weird, and maybe I have weird hands, but its easiest that way for me. Just my $0.02

Austin
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I don't fancy the idea of wrapping my thumb around on the "wrong" side. Once I have a basic grip on the gun, I don't want to break it any more than necessary, and really, using the finger isn't as unnatural as I first thought. I can ride the safety with my finger, and then flip it off as I drop the finger down to the trigger. Perfect practice makes perfect. :)
 
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