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I wanted to find an inexpensive way to test the feeding of some defense ammo, but given the relatively high cost of defensive ammo I didn't want to just start blasting some rounds up.

It's a very simple method and doesn't cost any more than a regular range shooting session. Simply pick your favorite ammo that reliably functions in whatever gun you are testing for and alternate the loading of the rounds in the magazine with the cheap fodder and the test rounds and finish so one of the cheap rounds is on top of the magazine. Load and fire the first round. Check that the subsequent round stripped off the magazine and properly fed then eject that round and fire the next. This will then chamber another test round and another feed inspection can be performed.

Repeat this as long as you feel is necessary to satisfy your testing requirement, or until you run out of ammo. Not only does this test the feedability of the rounds, but it also allows you to inspect for problems with bullets loosening from the cartridge case when subjected to multiple feedings. Starting with a 20 round box of test ammo plus sufficient plinking ammo, 100 feedings can easily be performed on the test ammo.

Granted this does not replace the actual live firing of the ammo to test for complete functionality. But this test method does allow you to test and ensure that the rounds will properly feed. Again, live fire testing is still important as the test rounds may have problems of their own in cycling the action or have extraction problems. But justification for the live fire testing of a larger quantity of the test ammunition can be based on the feed tests performed. If a test sample is experiencing chronic feed problems, spending the money to purchase a larger quantity of the test rounds may not be very prudent, unless a bad lot is suspected.
 

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I've always thought that, on a single stack like the 1911, to test expensive defensive ammo, load one in the bottom of the bag, then 4 rounds of practice ammo ammo, then one round defensive and a cheap one on top. In my experience you tend to have problems off either the top or bottom of the mag if its ammo related. This will test that the ammo will feed and cycle the weapon.

Of course the better solution is to go to a gun show and get a good deal on 50 rounds of your defensive ammo and use it. That's what I did for my defensive load of choice (Speer Gold Dot 230g).

Truthfully this is one thing I like about revolvers. If it will go in the chamber it'll shoot.
 

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".....but not always....."

Clemson_fan said:
(Speer Gold Dot 230g).

Truthfully this is one thing I like about revolvers. If it will go in the chamber it'll shoot.

More experience suggests (well, for me, actually proves) that statement to be untrue.

Mr. Smith has it right: "One is none, two is one" :scratch:
 

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WESHOOT2 said:
More experience suggests (well, for me, actually proves) that statement to be untrue.

Mr. Smith has it right: "One is none, two is one" :scratch:
You've got me confused on that one. What do you mean?
 

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experience

Actual experience has taught me that while infintely more forgiving of crap ammo then 'autos', revolvers will not always function with crap ammo that goes into its chambers.

I wear one gun normally, with a back-up gun (hopefully) within arm's reach.
When I'm scared I wear at least two; that way I figure at least one will go bang.

If forced into harm's way I'd clank.... :eek:
 

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I've never had a problem with any ammo that I could get in the chambers (properly, not with a hammer :biglaugh: )though, with some guns bullets can "jump" out of the case if the wrong load is used (I think this was a problem with the scandium S&W revolvers).
 
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