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Discussion Starter #1
Having gone through the shaker in Anchorage this morning, I came to a realization that I’ve not had before, and wanted to share with everyone. Several electric appliances and electronics hit the floor, and the power went out. Normally, I would have simply picked them up and gone about the rest of the required cleanup, but today I realized “what if there’s internal damage that I can’t see, and suppose the power gets restored as I’ve got my meat hooks wrapped around something”. So, I went and unplugged everything first, and then began cleanup. Just a little something to keep in mind!

Anchorage is kind of a mess, but thankfully, there’s no fatalities from this, and only one serious injury reported so far. My wife, my friends, and myself are all good. Roads and bridges, on the other hand, didn’t fare as well. Anchorage only has 2 roads in/out, and both have suffered damage to bridges and overpasses. Gonna be a long recovery!
 

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Proof positive that in an emergency bugging out via the main roads is a complete waste of time. Tonight I sat in traffic for over an hour because of an accident further up the road. If it had been the result of a natural disaster or the North Koreans invading there's absolutely no way in Hell that anyone was going to be able to use these roads to get where they think they'll be safe. Better to hunker down in place and make sure you've got everything you need at home. And don't expect to be able to GET home if you're not already there.
 

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Another good tip.

Kill the Main Breaker and all individual breakers.

Then power up after double checking for damage by engaging one circuit breaker at a time.

As for "Bugging Out"?

If we flood, a tornado wipes the house away, or the Anhydrous Tanks or a derailed railroad tank car is leaking dangerous fumes/gas, I'll "Bug Out".

Anything else and I'm staying home.
 

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Thank you Akbowman for starting this thread, and my best wishes to everyone affected. Alaskans are good, solid, strong, independent people; and their resiliency will help fast forward things to a recovery.

No doubt there will be very difficult consequences, perhaps not yet forseen by most, of this natural disaster. I've seen enough photos already to realize that a lot of damage has occurred. Just the damage to roadways alone is rather stunning.

My home county has now (currently) been under a tornado watch for a few hours (not unusual for N. Texas), so I've had to keep one eye on that ... Nature can be brutal...
 

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Friends of ours in Houston got stuck for a DAY on I-45 during the Hurricane Ike evacuation in 2008. Thankfully, they had a full tank of gas, and got off the road after 9 hours - having traveled less than 20 miles in that time. :eek:


You either gotta be THE first one OUT in a bug-out, or prepared to sit tight for a couple of weeks! You don't wanna be roadkill, easy pickin's, or a refugee!
 

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^^^

Excellent point.
 

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Glad to here from you Akbowman and that you and yours are ok.

Anchorage seems to have structurally and on personal levels come through well ( but I'm not there). Cudos to you guys in Ak.

The Northeast can't handle potholes or a 6 inch snowfall vs a 3 inch never mind a 7 earthquake. Several weeks back it took me 8 hours to get home due to some heavier/earlier / predicted snowfall ...ridiculous!

Thanks for checking in and sharing.
 

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Only experienced one earthquake and it was mild. Just 5 seconds of rumble that felt like a train going by. It was more of a *** is that than anything.

Glad you are all ok.
 

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Glad to hear you and yours are okay Akbowman. I lived in Eagle River in 1988 to 1989, and realized quickly that it is one of the most visually beautiful places in the world, but also can be the most unforgiving as far as what nature deals out at any given moment. Although I loved living in Ak., circumstances forced me to move back to Texas.

From the looks of the roads and bridges, I'm going to guess that any food and perishables destined for Anchorage area will have to come in by plane or ship until the highway in and out on either side of Anchorage can be sufficiently repaired. Hope everyone got good stocks of canned and frozen stuff from their gardens, hunting, or fishing season this past summer/fall.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for all the well wishes! It is much appreciated. After 24 hours to assess, my wife and I are relatively ok from yesterday, less than a grand’s worth of damage to our property, but many others did not fare so well. Thankfully, no deaths from this. Repairs will take quite some time as far as the roads go, due to frozen ground, snow, etc etc. Bridges and overpasses are a mess. I did make a run to the store yesterday about 90 minutes after the quake, and I was thankful that I didn’t have to bug out, as a mile long drive took me nearly an hour on back roads. The highway was a bumper to bumper gridlock. Anchorage has only 1 highway in and out to the north and to the south, so getting out other than flying or hoofing it through the mountains is out of the question.

We are a resilient bunch, and will make it through!
 

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I have won a buck or two.

From people not yet convinced that the Northernmost, Easternmost, and Westernmost points of the country were all in the same state. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Ok, I’m drawing a blank...explain the Easternmost part.:biglaugh:

LOL, that one catches a lot of people! The Aleutian Islands chain crosses the international date line, so it’s actually further east than any other part of the U.S.
 

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Perzactly right!

LOL, that one catches a lot of people! The Aleutian Islands chain crosses the international date line, so it’s actually further east than any other part of the U.S.
Most people do not know that. Part of the Aleutian island chain extends into Eastern longitude.
 

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Proof positive that in an emergency bugging out via the main roads is a complete waste of time. Tonight I sat in traffic for over an hour because of an accident further up the road. If it had been the result of a natural disaster or the North Koreans invading there's absolutely no way in Hell that anyone was going to be able to use these roads to get where they think they'll be safe. Better to hunker down in place and make sure you've got everything you need at home. And don't expect to be able to GET home if you're not already there.
+1. The plan for the westsiders to relocate to Grand Coulee Dam is ridiculous. I’ve seen the supplies (about thirty years ago they were there, anyway) but the two lane roads won’t handle the traffic. Just as well, after the idiotic laws the voters in Sno-King-Pierce Counties have forced on the rest of the state no one wants to see them anyway.

BTW, I’m glad you and yours are okay, Akbowman.
 

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AKbowman….glad you made it ok. Was a kid in 1964 in Anchorage lived in the Sand Lake area when that quake hit. Remember it like yesterday. Alaskans are a different breed, self sufficient and tough. I think the worst part I remember were the after shocks, seems they went on for a year before things really settled down to normal again. Thoughts and prayers go out to you.
 
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