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That still comes AFTER removing the magazine and locking the slide to the rear to verify the firearm is empty.
It may come after removing the mag and maybe not. And, no guarantee the person even removed the magazine. As someone said repeatedly, “Stupid is as stupid does.” And I say, “Ignorance should be forgiven and educated away. Stupidity is a life long affliction.”
 

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Story is on countless sites.

Ms. Foley probably didn't have an easy life (partially evidenced by different surname from her son), and didn't have the raw talents of an "A-lister"; acting is a tough business for anyone not close to "A-list" category...but was obviously loved by those around her.

The latter observation tells the most about her.

The irresponsible fool now charged with manslaughter should have a long stay in the Big House to think about it.

And anyone who isn't already 100% focused on safe gun handling should do a personal re-set.
 

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^^^^I think our Forum regulars are already, and have long been, committed to safe, proper firearms handling. Anything else is crazy and irresponsible, and I think each of us knows this.

Personally, I think it is contrary to the most basic rules to point an assembled firearm towards a sheetrock/wallboard wall when one knows that another person resides on the other side. Not everyone might agree, I know, but that's my thinking. There are typically other walls, even in the smallest of apartments.
 

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^^^^I think our Forum regulars are already, and have long been, committed to safe, proper firearms handling. Anything else is crazy and irresponsible, and I think each of us knows this.

Personally, I think it is contrary to the most basic rules to point an assembled firearm towards a sheetrock/wallboard wall when one knows that another person resides on the other side. Not everyone might agree, I know, but that's my thinking. There are typically other walls, even in the smallest of apartments.
Too many movies where the guy hides behind a wall, normal construction (sheetrock covered 2x4s) and the bullets do not pass through. Yet later in the movie you might see bullets punching holes in concrete. I'm always aware of what's on the other side of a wall (all four), in the basement, and the room above. Obviously this guy wasn't.

Grumpy
 
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^^^^I think our Forum regulars are already, and have long been, committed to safe, proper firearms handling. Anything else is crazy and irresponsible, and I think each of us knows this.

Personally, I think it is contrary to the most basic rules to point an assembled firearm towards a sheetrock/wallboard wall when one knows that another person resides on the other side. Not everyone might agree, I know, but that's my thinking. There are typically other walls, even in the smallest of apartments.
A safe direction can be bought: they used to, probably do, sell something called "Safe Direction", $200 some time ago IIRC. I liked the idea and made my own using a completely full box of tractor-fed paper and a nearly full "General Bucket" full of sand. The two have yet to be proven capable of stopping any of my semi-auto handgun rounds; but I have great confidence it the combination. There's always a risk of slam-fire when loading; a reasonable safe-direction should be used.

Here's a way to see that a pistol is not and cannot be loaded; used in the classroom and for dry-fire:

Dry-fire device

These I started making after the 4th or 5th $15 "Saf-T-Barrel" broke from operating the slide; the "Saf-T-Barrel" had a half-life of dropping the slide about 10 times. These DIYs cost about $0.35; and they last a lot longer.
 
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Some guns you can’t field strip without pulling the trigger. Most idiotic design flaw I’ve ever seen.
The fact that some people think this is a design flaw is silly IMHO. By that reasoning, it's a design flaw that guns have triggers and can shoot people. If you can't figure out how to clear a gun before you pull the trigger, you shouldn't have one. It's just not complicated...at all!
 

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The fact that some people think this is a design flaw is silly IMHO. By that reasoning, it's a design flaw that guns have triggers and can shoot people. If you can't figure out how to clear a gun before you pull the trigger, you shouldn't have one. It's just not complicated...at all!
Please refer to Murphy's Law...
 

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Please refer to Murphy's Law...
Agreed. Not only Murphy, but his 'Idiots Corollary' as well. Not only will things go wrong when they can, but you also have to factor in the idiocy level of the participants in determining the severity of the inevitable consequences. In other words, Murphy is truly happy in the company of morons!
 

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The fact that some people think this is a design flaw is silly IMHO. By that reasoning, it's a design flaw that guns have triggers and can shoot people. If you can't figure out how to clear a gun before you pull the trigger, you shouldn't have one. It's just not complicated...at all!
Much Agreed!

People thinking this is a design flaw, have a design flaw in their thinking, imo!
 

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^^^
^^^
^^^
^^^
Probably at least some truth in both viewpoints.

Especially given known differences in human intelligence.
 
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I was on a rescue squad for many years and saw a bunch of gun suicides/accidents. Most were out and out suicides abut a few were "I was cleaning the gun" type of accident. What better way than to relieve the family of the stigma of suicide and get full insurance death benefits.
 

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From a long-ago employment, this reminds me of the warning signs on potato slicers, a high rpm device with very sharp blades, in Frito-Lay plants. I suppose some people need to be reminded...
My 1st day acting as plant safety officer, on top of my Q.C. role, the lead die-maker called on me. He wanted me to approve a bending die to form 000, i.e. heavy gauge wire. The die had no guard and was rotating the bent part through an ~80deg arc. Consulting the O.S.H.A. manual ... the die clearly did not comply. The die-maker was all upset:

  • it's only for 6 prototype parts
  • she's the best press-brake operator ...
  • ... you're insulting her
  • making a guard means delay on urgent parts
  • you're being unreasonable

New at the company; my 1st day at this role; the die-maker had been the safety officer before my predecessor; my 1yr at steel fab to his 30yrs; and my 20yrs old to his 50yrs. Without a guard nor my approval, the run was started. At the 4th part she had her head in the arc of the wire and was badly injured. Never had to argue about safety after that, just drop the operator's name: end of discussion.
 
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^^^ So many similar (true) stories in industry. There's always people who never learn.
 
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^^^ So many similar (true) stories in industry. There's always people who never learn.
The die-maker himself bent the last 2 1/2 parts; shop steward and myself watching. We couldn't wait to build and install a guard because ...

- We've already lost 1/2 the workday getting <the operator> to the E.R. and filling out accident reports!

We watched to make sure he didn't get his head in the way ... I didn't even wait 'til he pressed the pedal, point at the floor and ask:

What's that?!?!?

Really ... didn't even think of it until writing this post >40yrs later.
 
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