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Any Comments On S&W 59 or 459?

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Looking for plusses or drawbacks in this design. The reason is, I once had an FEG GKK92C which is basically a S&W 59 and I liked it a lot. Now I want it again, but the FEG version has too much baggage (parts, magazines) so I'm thinking 'get the real thing' but I've never picked one up.
Any thoughts?
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I never could like the Model 59, ergonomics just didn’t work for me. Loved the model 39 though.

The 459 has vastly improved ergonomics, trigger…well…everything. It’s a whole lot better than the 59 and not a bad shooter at all. The 3rd Gen S&W’s are brute strong, and very reliable. But finding magazines can sometimes be a challenge depending on which model you’re looking at.
The ergonomics of a 59/459 are horrible, literally is like holding a 2x4 in your hand.
 

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No, a Glock is like a 2x4. A Smith 59/459 is like holding the fat end of a baseball bat. ;)
 

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I never could like the Model 59, ergonomics just didn’t work for me. Loved the model 39 though.

The 459 has vastly improved ergonomics, trigger…well…everything. It’s a whole lot better than the 59 and not a bad shooter at all. The 3rd Gen S&W’s are brute strong, and very reliable. But finding magazines can sometimes be a challenge depending on which model you’re looking at.
Interestingly enough 39 magazines would not work in a 639 I owned for a short period, and 639 mags were impossible to find at the time. I rather liked the 59, never had a 659, but be sure to check magazine compatibility and availability.
 

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The standard double-stack mags of my 3rd Gen Model 915 work perfectly in my Model 59. There was a time when S&W mags were more common than Glock mags, and they were used by many other manufacturers such as Marlin. Now they've completely dried up and are hard to find. Mec-Gar used to make them as well but I haven't seen theirs for sale in a long while.
 
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My 1st auto was a Blue 59. Never a problem except trying to find wood grip panels for it, no one made them back then either. I made my own, truly wish I still had it.
Traded it for a Belgium Hi- Power, still have it.
 

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No, a Glock is like a 2x4. A Smith 59/459 is like holding the fat end of a baseball bat. ;)
I carried a a 459 as a duty sidearm for about 8 months in the late 1990's. When our department transitioned from the 459 to a Gen 3 G23 everyone agreed it was a vast improvement in trigger and ergonomics.

We had the option of purchasing our issued 459 at a bargain price and I recall only two deputies purchased theirs and that was so they could make a fast buck reselling theirs.
 

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I didn't like the grip of the original 59 at all, but the third generation were much better as was the trigger and reliability. The 39 was great and I have several of them. I use to live near Cleveland where Devel Corporation was located and shot IPSC at a club in Medina. One of the members had a Devel 59. It looked sweet and if I would of had the money I would of gotten a 59 converted.
 

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Although I love metal-framed pistols, with polymer pistols representing a tiny fraction of my overall collection, the various standard-production metal-framed S&Ws just never sang to me in any way. I’m definitely glad they were made — and I wish they were still being made — but handling and shooting them just never gave me even the slightest urge to buy one.

On the other hand, the flagship steel-framed pistols from the Performance Center (when the PC was much more than a lame marketing gimmick) are some of my favorite handguns of all time.
 

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I got to shoot J. Michael Plaxco's PC 4006 comp gun back in the day, it was sure a fun, soft-shooting pistol. It was a heavy club, and completely unsuited for carry purposes or duty use, for that matter. Plaxco was on S&W's shooting team back then, with Tom Campbell and his one-off .45 (at that time), and I worked at a shooting range, we hosted them for a Smith and Wesson Day. They helped us sell a LOT of Smiths that week.
 

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The Model 59 had a fairly long run for a Smith & Wesson product, from 1971 until 1982 when the 2nd generation models came out. Mine runs perfectly fine. I just absolutely hate the trigger, but other than that it's a pretty decent gun.
I’ll grant that statement on their pistols. Revolvers are another story. I have an M&P 40c and a 2.0 c in 9mm. The 59 just does not stand up to them.
 

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When I was younger and fresh out of the military, I’d compete at the Mtn. Home AFB Range Action Pistol matches that were held there. Being young and not sure what I liked, I went through a few different pistols over a couple years of shooting there, and I probably did my best shooting with my Grandfather’s Model 59. It and my HiPower were limited by minor power factor, but the follow up shots were faster and I had more X-ring torso hits with the 9mm’s. The 59 was a little more accurate, and it won me a bowling pin match one weekend there. Although somewhat different than the HP’s grip, the 59 didn’t shift in my hand and I never found myself adjusting my grip like I would with 1911s. The folks at Smith & Wesson had obviously put a lot of thought into the pistol. While the finish did wear on the forward part of the rails, it doesn’t have any additional play that can be detected. My Father has the pistol today, and it’s seen thousands of rounds from regular use over four decades—I’d say S&W made a pretty good pistol when they designed the 59.
Shti Scheklim Sheli!
 

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I bought 2 handguns when I was in Omaha (USAF) a M59 and a POS Auto Ord 1911. This was 1981-2.

I sold the M59 to a friend. Nothing wrong with it really. I could not get used to the grip on the M59.
I shipped the 1911 back to NYC. I still have it. ff to 2015 - I bought a 1006.
 

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I’ll grant that statement on their pistols. Revolvers are another story. I have an M&P 40c and a 2.0 c in 9mm. The 59 just does not stand up to them.
No disagreement there. The M&P 2.0 Compact is one of my favorites of the modern handguns and easily shoots circles around an old pistol like the Model 59.
 
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Funny how models come and go and we never notice. People just assume newer marketing programs produce better Guns. Big secret folks, marketing and profit does not have much to do with function or quality or value. The guns or cars or chain saws that are going to be put on the shelf are going to be the ones that makes the most money in a given year based on what the market is or much better what they can make the market be. It does not matter what you or I think based on our actual experience, we will alter our opinion based upon what the gun writers say in some extensive test, they performed, that "proves" one is great, the other junk., by their paid testing. Gun people are likely the most gullible buyers in the sporting goods market. The sporting goods market for handguns are people who buy guns that are used for recurring range practice, as opposed to purchasers who use them for hunting only, defense or law enforcement. Some of us buy them for multiple purposes but some will be just for that range fun and that is exactly why they are pushing $4000 guns with $400 dot sights and $300 timers and $500 video cams so you can play back your shooting to your buds on Facebook. They will never know you are a real gun fighter, unless you post b
videos each week.

The reason for the marketing talk? Because some Guns, like the SW model 59, the Ruger 89-95 series and others just fell out of favor, for no rational reason other than what the other marketing people said about them. When the model 59 came to
law enforcement, I was carrying a model 19 and occasionally a 1911 Commander, The only high capacity 9mm was the Browning Highpower, and many did not trust them. The model 59 was reserved for the greatest gun fighters in law enforcement.

The model 59 was a favorite of SWAT and special units. If you saw one it was carried by DEA or high level narcotics officers. The model 59 stayed at the top of the heap until the Glocks came along, and then suddenly it was too heavy. I was in specialized units by then and we were back ton1911s, so I never carried a Model 59 on the job.

I did buy a model 915 from a police supply. In those days the Marlin Camp Carbine was a handy 9mm carbine that took the same magazines as all those high cap Smith and Wessons. It was common to see cops carrying both. I found the model 915 to be a great gun, better than any Sig I gad ever used and certainly a bargain. I compared them in value to the CZ 75, which I am also very fond of. Today people who have both the 59 and Camp Carbine are a cult.

When I hear someone trash them, I always ask if they used them in police work or competition. I have never found anyone who used them much who trashed them just people who had limited exposure to them. They are bigger than I like to carry but for a house or car gun, they are great.

If I could buy them cheap; I would buy several. You could arm your family for when the zombies come, anyone can shoot them well.
 

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Funny how models come and go and we never notice. People just assume newer marketing programs produce better Guns. Big secret folks, marketing and profit does not have much to do with function or quality or value. The guns or cars or chain saws that are going to be put on the shelf are going to be the ones that makes the most money in a given year based on what the market is or much better what they can make the market be. It does not matter what you or I think based on our actual experience, we will alter our opinion based upon what the gun writers say in some extensive test, they performed, that "proves" one is great, the other junk., by their paid testing. Gun people are likely the most gullible buyers in the sporting goods market. The sporting goods market for handguns are people who buy guns that are used for recurring range practice, as opposed to purchasers who use them for hunting only, defense or law enforcement. Some of us buy them for multiple purposes but some will be just for that range fun and that is exactly why they are pushing $4000 guns with $400 dot sights and $300 timers and $500 video cams so you can play back your shooting to your buds on Facebook. They will never know you are a real gun fighter, unless you post b
videos each week.

The reason for the marketing talk? Because some Guns, like the SW model 59, the Ruger 89-95 series and others just fell out of favor, for no rational reason other than what the other marketing people said about them. When the model 59 came to
law enforcement, I was carrying a model 19 and occasionally a 1911 Commander, The only high capacity 9mm was the Browning Highpower, and many did not trust them. The model 59 was reserved for the greatest gun fighters in law enforcement.

The model 59 was a favorite of SWAT and special units. If you saw one it was carried by DEA or high level narcotics officers. The model 59 stayed at the top of the heap until the Glocks came along, and then suddenly it was too heavy. I was in specialized units by then and we were back ton1911s, so I never carried a Model 59 on the job.

I did buy a model 915 from a police supply. In those days the Marlin Camp Carbine was a handy 9mm carbine that took the same magazines as all those high cap Smith and Wessons. It was common to see cops carrying both. I found the model 915 to be a great gun, better than any Sig I gad ever used and certainly a bargain. I compared them in value to the CZ 75, which I am also very fond of. Today people who have both the 59 and Camp Carbine are a cult.

When I hear someone trash them, I always ask if they used them in police work or competition. I have never found anyone who used them much who trashed them just people who had limited exposure to them. They are bigger than I like to carry but for a house or car gun, they are great.

If I could buy them cheap; I would buy several. You could arm your family for when the zombies come, anyone can shoot them well.
My experience with the 59 was very positive, and I was surprised to see several still in service when I visited Israel in 2017. There must have been a large contract that went there as they are very common for civilian carry and they are mostly devoid of any finish when you see them.
 

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Or just sucked. I never ran into any LEO carrying model 59 and I was in one of the top four departments in the US>
My local department carried nothing but 59s in the late-80s, early-90s. I had an FFL at the time and sold some guns to the department and also a bunch of personal BUGs to a lot of officers. They called me in one day because they had a new officer who was a small woman, so the 59 was too big for her hands. They wanted me to meet her and suggest an alternative. At the time, the department only approved S&Ws and Colts, and no single action autos (i.e 1911 or BHP), I sold her a Model 39 and extra mags, and she was all set. She recently retired from the department as a sergeant after putting in 30 years.
 

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Not saying no one did, I just never ran across one. I did recover a 39 with Illinois State Police marks out of a dope house. I know they went to the 59 after the 39. Prolly a great pistol but not for me.
 
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