1911Forum banner
1 - 20 of 84 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,557 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's a question that popped into my head while following my JHP thread.

I like Hornady's Critical Defense rounds that have the small "plastic" insert within the hollow point cavity. With the exception of possibly finding some pull-downs, they are not available as a component (at least I've not found them). I'm told the insert is to initiate expansion and possibly produce better expansion at less-than-optimal velocities.

So, could a reloader fill the cavity of a hollow point bullet with something that would produce similar results? I have read articles that say when the cavity fills with clothing the bullet doesn't expand properly, so what makes the insert any different? I would imagine any sort of caulking would be too soft. Would hot glue possibly work?

I'm curious but suffer from "Lack of secondary educational degrees." Any one care to offer their thoughts?

Grumpy
 

·
Premium Member
Prefer Commanders
Joined
·
3,017 Posts
It would be interesting to cut one apart or split it to see how the soft insert is designed to initiate expansion, I have been curious about this for a long time Grumpy.

Encountered material would make the insert go deep into the cavity to start it to open. I stick with open cavity JHPs.

Great question......I have seen the results of clogged Golden Sabers performance. Turned them into solids with extreme penetration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
420 Posts
I have personally experienced Hornady's Critical Defense rubber insert acting as a door stop on a 1911 feed ramp. I trimmed the insert even with the top of the bullet and they fed just fine after that.

For this reason, I stay clear of this type of bullet. It's a gimmick IMHO.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,557 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have personally experienced Hornady's Critical Defense rubber insert acting as a door stop on a 1911 feed ramp. I trimmed the insert even with the top of the bullet and they fed just fine after that.

For this reason, I stay clear of this type of bullet. It's a gimmick IMHO.
The ones I have are .380s and the insert does not extend past the level of the jacket. Those could not be trimmed shorter except with a drill bit.

Grumpy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
I have personally experienced Hornady's Critical Defense rubber insert acting as a door stop on a 1911 feed ramp. I trimmed the insert even with the top of the bullet and they fed just fine after that.

For this reason, I stay clear of this type of bullet. It's a gimmick IMHO.
This further reinforces the adage to always check your carry loads for reliability. My P365 eats them with no problems. But as we all already know, guns are just as individual as people.

As for the insert itself, I've heard two lines of reasoning: One is to ensure reliable expansion in different target types. The other is that since the insert fills the cavity of the bullet it is no longer legally considered a hollowpoint.

Of course I have no personal knowledge as to the veracity of either statement.

As always, your mileage may vary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
634 Posts
I suspect that the rubber insert's volume cannot be decreased. So if force is added to the front of the rubber insert, the volume would stay the same by forcing the jacket leaves outward, sort of like applying a downward force on a basketball. The clothing can be compressed and it's volume decreased so it provides no lateral force to open the jacket leaves. Funny I was thinking about this very issue earlier today.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,557 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I've read where people would fill the cavity with putty.
It would need to a putty that was highly resistive to compression, able to withstand high, but brief elevated temperatures, and rigid enough to start the jacket expanding. I guess that rules out Silly Putty. :)

Grumpy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,823 Posts
(Does 2yrs of Industrial Engineering count?:unsure:)

Hydraulics! Or more precisely, Fluid Dynamics.

The somewhat fluid 'flex-tip' gets forced back upon impact and finds the path of least resistance. The base is thick, so the thinner petals around the cavity get forced outward.

Pull a bullet, set it flat on it's base. Take a piece or wood, set it on the tip, and hit the back end with a heavy hammer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,386 Posts
If the idea is any good, Bill Wilson will start selling it with his line of Lehigh ammo.
Someone told me once, packing a hollow point with Sodium and sealing it with varnish works great on Terrorists, but he may have pulling my leg, I never tried it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,823 Posts
Back when hollowpoints first started becoming popular there were all sorts of stories. One popular one was filling the cavity with mercury! :rolleyes:
IIRC, that trick was shown on TV many times.

Or black powder.

Or plastic explosive.
 

·
Registered
Small primers forever!
Joined
·
3,232 Posts
Back when hollowpoints first started becoming popular there were all sorts of stories. One popular one was filling the cavity with mercury! :rolleyes:
IIRC, that trick was shown on TV many times.

Or black powder.

Or plastic explosive.
Well, I'd try the mercury idea, but my stash is worth more than the guns, at this point ;-)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
420 Posts
The ones I have are .380s and the insert does not extend past the level of the jacket. Those could not be trimmed shorter except with a drill bit.

Grumpy
My experience was with 45 acp.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Old Grumpy

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,385 Posts
Someone told me once, packing a hollow point with Sodium and sealing it with varnish works great on Terrorists, but he may have pulling my leg, I never tried it.
Sodium reacts with the oxygen in air, causing it to burn. It is normally stored under nitrogen or a suitable liquid to keep it from reacting with the air. I would advise against trying this.
 
1 - 20 of 84 Posts
Top