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Discussion Starter #1
Well after many years the AR-15 bug finally bit and I was compelled to buy a Bushmaster A3 with the 20” stainless steel barrel. With the standard open sights it shoots as well as these old eyes can see at 100 yards. In short it is a fun gun to shoot and I really like everything about it except the [email protected]#!%!^@$ 8+ pound trigger. It is clear that I need to install an aftermarket trigger to really enjoy shooting this gun. I am a bit shy about adjustable triggers because of the problems I have read about them and I really do not see the benefit of a 2 stage trigger after trying to master this one. So that brings me down to single stage non-adjustable triggers, i.e. Accuracy Speaks. However since I am new to the AR-15 I would appreciate any recommendations or experiences you would like to share.

Thanks,
 

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I've not done this myself, the heavy trigger on my Bushie is OK for what I need it for, plinking and just in case you know what.

"15-Minute Practical Trigger Job for the AR-15

by
AFreeMan

Medcop was shooting Urodoji’s CAR-15 and had commented to him on the excellent, smooth
trigger. I was asked to send Medcop a description of how this was done. Urodoji got Medcop in touch with me, and I did some sketches, and described to Medcop how to do it.
I thought this was common knowledge, but I was asked on AR15.com’s Chat to write this up for
posting. So here goes…

______________________________________________

Disclaimer: If you can’t follow these directions successfully, you should not be playing with
guns, especially AR-15’s.
______________________________________________

Materials needed:

Two Encyclopedias (you may sub two wood blocks, these are used to prop up the lower receiver)

Small punch (for trigger/hammer pins)

Large soft punch (3/8” Delrin rod or 3/8” wood dowel)

Fine compound (#7 rubbing compound or Kit Scratch Out plastic polish)

Wire Cutters

Jeweler’s Pliers (small pliers with no teeth in the jaws)



UNLOAD RIFLE AND SEPARATE UPPER RECEIVER FROM LOWER RECEIVER
I had to say this, too. If you didn’t know this, you should not be handling firearms.



(1) Remove the Safety (AR-15’s have safeties, M16’s have selectors) to allow easy removal of
the Trigger later. Turn the Safety 45 degrees, halfway between SAFE and FIRE. Lay the Lower
Receiver on its left side on the two encyclopedias (with the Web, they aren’t good for anything
else) or wood blocks, covered with soft rags such that the Lower Receiver is blocked up, and the

Safety can be tapped out. Tap out the Safety with the large soft Delrin® punch or wood dowel.
With the Safety halfway between Safe and Fire it will pop out without having to remove the grip
and detent. Don’t worry about losing the Safety Detent, as it is captured by a groove in its hole.

(2) Polish the sear surfaces. With the Hammer in the up, or fired position, place a dab of
polishing compound on the Hammer sear surface. To prevent the hammer from striking the
receiver and possibly breaking the bolt stop, place a strip of leather, rubber or plastic in front of
the hammer. Cock the Hammer and pull the Trigger. Repeat this 10 times. Put another dab of
compound on the Hammer’s sear surface, and cock and fire 10 more times.

(3) Now remove the Hammer first, then the Trigger and Disconnector, by tapping out their pins.

(4) Clean off every trace of compound from the Hammer and Trigger. Do it again to make sure.
Clean any compound from inside the Lower Receiver.

(5) Clip the right leg of the Hammer Spring to a length of ¼”.





(6) Bend both legs of the Trigger Spring UP approximately 25 degrees as per the diagram. Use
Jeweler’s pliers for this. You do not want to leave marks in the spring. Smooth jawed pliers
only!




(7) Reassemble the Trigger assembly with the Trigger Pin’s outer retaining groove to the LEFT
side of the Receiver.

(8) Install the Safety. A little trick… Hold the detent down with the end of a ¼” punch while
tapping in the Safety from the other side.

(9) Install the Hammer. When installing the Hammer Pin it does not matter which side the outer groove is on. Notice that the left leg of the Hammer Spring engages the outer groove of the Trigger Pin, which you installed to be on the left side, retaining it in the Receiver. (You may also want to use “Anti-Walk Pins”. If you use these, install these pins so that the E-clips are away from your body to prevent the E-clips from snagging on your clothing and possibly snapping off. If you are right-handed, the E-clips should be on the right. And if you are left-handed, the E-clips should be on the left.)

(10) Lubricate all the moving lower part, making sure you put a drop of oil on the Hammer sear surface.



Caution: DO NOT modify the Trigger Spring without also modifying the Hammer Spring as
described.

I have used this trigger job method for about 10 years now, and have NEVER had it fail to pop
the cap. Hammer Spring force is only reduced by about 25%, and there is still plenty of power to insure good ignition. There is still full sear engagement, so the trigger is not unsafe in any way.

This trigger job DOES result in a smoother, lighter trigger pull.

If you are unhappy with your results, at the most, you have only ruined two springs, three dollars worth of parts. This slight polishing with the compound will not harm your Hammer and Triggerin any way.
Good Shooting!
A Free Man"
 

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Grunt, you beat me to it. Get the springs and with minimal polishing you get a smooth 4 pound trigger.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks everyone for your responses. :) I will try polishing the contact points and see how much that helps. That may work without doing much else; I’ll just take it one step at a time.
 

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Xhair
Many people believe the KAC two stage trigger is the best trigger there is for the AR, so you might want to reconsider your dsecision regarding two stage triggers. That said, if you decide to just do the polish thing remember that the surfaces you are working on are hardened and it won't take much to cut through this surface down to bare metal, so using polishing compounds, rather than a file or stone, is the way to go.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Tusk,

Thanks for the caution and input. Have you tried the KAC trigger?
I have concerns about any trigger that is adjustable. The common thread on the boards is that adjustable AR-15 triggers get out of adjustment sooner or later.

Thanks,
 

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Accuracy Speaks did a trigger job on an A2 for me many years ago, good trigger, good service. I've got one now with a JP trigger, just over 2 lb., many rounds through it, never doubled, nice and crisp.
 

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I have a Jewell trigger in mine...took less than an hour to install and it is the sweetest two stage trigger that you can find!!!!
 

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Trigger

I would just shoot it for a while and put some good grease (I don't want to start a grease war!) on the sear. I know mine, with Bushmaster parts, has improved greatly in 1200+ rounds and the only thing I have done is to keep a blob of white lithium grease on the sear/hammer contact.

I wouldn't throw a whole lot of money at it before giving nature a chance to work on it.

I am a recent convert, too.

Cheers!
 

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Xhair,
Yes, I have a KAC in one of my AR's, as well as a JP in another. I haven't tried the Jewel, so I can't speak to that. The KAC is great. I've got about 2000 rounds on it now with no readjusting after the initial install. They are very expensive and because of the cost I'd recomend trying one, or any of the aftermarkets for that matter, before you buy, if you can. You might check out www.AR15.com and ask around over there. You might even be able to hook up with someone there who can get you some trigger time on anything you are seriously looking at.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks again everyone for all the great responses.:) Now I will have to think on it a bit:confused: Oh well half the fun is doing the research. In the mean time I think I'll just shoot this one as is for a bit more and see if I can find some folks at the range with some of the recommended ones to try.
 
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