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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As years go by, Colt's are harder to come by both 1911 and 1911A1. I'm starting to see more and more threads on Remington Rands. In your opinion, do you think they will sky rocket in price in the next coming years or do you think they are going to be the same as they are now? From my observation, you are starting to see more mixed and matched Remington Rands and to me that means the all original ones will be harder to come by. What do you think?

James
 

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I think they will go up in price but that Colt will always be more sought after due to the name and the fact they made less of them in WW2.

Colt is an Iconic name, ask most people who made .45s in WW2 and the first name out of their mouth will be likely be Colt.

I think there are more Remington Rands in really nice shape out there then there are of Colts. Part of that is because RR made more and part of that is that RR made a lot at the end of the war that never made it to the field.
 

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Type III Remington Rands are by far the most common M1911A1 variation, so their selling prices make a good yardstick for everything else. Yes they'll go up in value but almost everything else will still be higher.
 

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Call me crazy, but as time goes on, I am starting to appreciate the RR's more than Colt's in a lot a ways. I think the Type 1/2's will go up substantially, but the 3's will probably stay around the bottom end for the reason's DSK mentioned. Either way, you can't go wrong with any WWII 1911A1 and I think that as the years pass, the attrition will drive the value of the whole group with original guns bringing an ultra premium. Just my opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I would love to own a Colt 1911 but they are too expensive. Actually I would like a nice blued 1911 but not many people make them anymore. I was thinking of having my RIA blued but I bet after the cost of getting it blued I probably could buy a blued 1911. Yeah the TYPE 3 are the most common but I think they will go for more than most people think in a few years.
 

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Colt is an Iconic name, ask most people who made .45s in WW2 and the first name out of their mouth will be likely be Colt.
A lot of the service members didn't even know the difference between the manufacturers. They just assumed that all the M1911A1s were made by Colt. That's a pretty good testament to the Colt name. Most of the RRs I see nowadays are Type IIIs and are usually overpriced. The sellers are smart and taking advantage of the USGI fad.
 

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Lots of people have been looking for/hoping for a correction in prices, I don't see that happening. Look lately at what the Lend Lease and Arsenal rebuilds have been going for.
 

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The only way prices are going to 'stabilize' or drop is in the event of a major economical downturn. We have entered a new phase with the USGI .45, with the early ones now over 100 years old. Soon all M1911s will be at least 100, with the M1911A1s not that far behind. My RR and I will be 100 the same year! LOL I'm sure whoever has it then will enjoy that irony. Anyway, many factors have come together to drive prices up - for example, even if the government still has any 1911s, they will never sell surplus handguns to the public again or allow them to be imported so, what is out there now is it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The only way prices are going to 'stabilize' or drop is in the event of a major economical downturn. We have entered a new phase with the USGI .45, with the early ones now over 100 years old. Soon all M1911s will be at least 100, with the M1911A1s not that far behind. My RR and I will be 100 the same year! LOL I'm sure whoever has it then will enjoy that irony. Anyway, many factors have come together to drive prices up - for example, even if the government still has any 1911s, they will never sell surplus handguns to the public again or allow them to be imported so, what is out there now is it.
Last economical downturn gun sales soared. I'm glad I got my hands on one before it is too late.

James
 

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Anyone one of us can do a quick calculation/WAG on the back of a napkin:
About 3 million produced. Subtract 400,000 still on active duty and/or storage (according to USG inventory from the M9 pistol trials). Subtract 1,250,000 distributed as foreign aid packages over the decades. Subtract 850,000 as loss due to all causes including war or battle damage. Subtract 550,000 destroyed by Uncle Sam. Subtract 25,000 for USGI 'bringbacks'. Subtract 75,000 in the open US market due to all other causes.
This means about 100,000 are in private civilian hands in the USA. I estimate about 10,000 of that are in various foreign countries owned by collectors.
Of the 100K, I estimate about 10-15,000 are in 85-90% or better condition.
I estimate of the 80million firearm owneres in America there are roughly 1 to 3million of them who are interested enought to collect militaria. Of those, about 500,000 are truly interested in M1911s with about 30,000 of those serious "collectors".
Thus, due to supply and demand, is the reason why pristine condition M1911s are currently so expensive. Therefore, whatever mix-masters/arsenal refinish/etc are left is IT. There are none available. There won't be any released for public sale. What is available is what currently exists. Simple law of supply and demand has already demonstrated that: all those who belittle mix-masters now acknowledge their increased value from, say, 1990. The prices for original condition have likewise risen in value because of the finite amount available. Once that occurred, market pressure forced consumers to other outlets such as acquisition of formerly 'less-desirable' models. I further predict that once ALL of the M1911s are accounted for, the market will further seek an additional outlet and we shall see yet again once 'undesirable' models increase in value - and that is simply because it will be the only item for a consumer to buy…unless they can afford the higher prices of a 1911. Examples of this phenomena have already played out from muscle cars to baseball cards. For gun collecting it was Colt and Winchester…so the market expanded to less expensive vintage models from Marlin, Remington or Savage. Look at Luger collecting - to get in the game for a prime example you need several thousand $; and so it is with 1911s.
Let's talk turkey, do the math, and estimate appreciation rates: say, 1.5% a year. So, in 2050 when an original condition 1911 is worth 10k +, a mixmaster is worth 3k, Singers are going for 500k what does that the average collector? Go buy a Ruger, Nighthawk, Wilson Combat or Kimber.
 
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