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I have been thinking about putting a pair of thin grips on my 1911 for concealed, but don't know if they would really make that much of a difference. How many of you use thin grips or have used thin grips on your 1911? Did they really make a difference for concealed carry?

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Hero45
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I would say that they do not make any difference as far as concealed carry is concerned but they sure make a difference in the way the weapon feels in the hand. I have thin grips on all of my 1911's and I love them.

I can get at the magazine release without changing my grip and I can really get what I believe to be a super solid grip on the weapon.

It's all a matter of personal taste I suppose but I recommend them highly.
 

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I have Chip McC. thin grips on all my shooters because they fit my hand better than standard grips. Suprisingly, many who have tried them at the range really like the way the pistols handle - even those with normal to larger hands.

As for concealment, I don't notice much (if any) difference from standard wood grips.

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Roger D
 

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Agreed. Not any noticeable difference in concealment, but it is surprising how much difference slim grips can make in control. If you can't reach the magazine release without shifting your grip, you are a candidate for slim grips.

The AFS "Slim Tech" grips from Brownells are recommended.
 

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The thin stocks' contribution to concealability is pretty inconsequential, but every little bit helps. Most folks who prefer them like the "feel" they provide. I do.

The "feel" issue is based on making the butt's cross-section more of a long rectangle, versus a square. If you've ever handled the egregious old S&W M-59, you'll probably have noted that it feels like grabbing a piece of 2x2 lumber. The squarish cross-section of the butt makes it difficult to feel exactly how the pistol is pointing. The more rectangular cross-section of a 1911 gives more tactile feedback in this regard, with the sides being longer than the ends. The thin stocks just futher enhance this effect.

Thin stocks also better suit the piece to smaller hands. Thin stocks, a flat mainspring housing, and a short trigger will allow all but the smallest of hands to comfortably use the 1911.

I would differ with KLN on the issue of being able to reach the magazine release. One should have to shift one's grip somewhat to reach the magazine release. This helps enforce getting one's trigger finger off the trigger while reloading.

AFS, McCormick, Spegel, Ahrends, and Navidrex offer thin 1911 stocks. They all use proprietary bushings and screws. The McCormicks are cut to accomodate a Swenson-style ambi safety, while the AFS stocks will not (I'm not sure about the others).

None of the thin stocks incorporate a "lip" to help support the plunger tube, like the GI stocks. This is not a big issue, but since a loose plunger tube can tie up the pistol's safety, pistol fitted with thin stocks should have their plunger tubes checked for tightness regularly.

Rosco
 

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How many of y'all who have posted so far actually have thin grips? How many of you have enough body bulk to conceal a Desert Eagle .50?

Roscoe is right, thin grips reduced the cross section dimensions of the grip area of the gun. In IWB carry, this is going to be the area that sticks out of the pants, right? So anything that reduces size will help.

So far, most have said the difference is inconsequential or doesn't matter. This is really individual dependent as well as clothing dependent.

I have seen guys big enough that they can conceal a Desert Eagle .50 and like Robb noted, for people like that, thin grips are not going to matter.

Contrary to Robb, however, thin grips really are a drop in change, but you have to change the bushings and screws. Those come with the grips. By drop in change, this means that you don't have to do custom fitting such as you might need to do for a barrel.

Thin grips are great for people with small hands, but I think they are great for me and I don't have small hands. As Patrickl noted, a person with normal sized hands can work the controls without a significant grip/hold change. I find it possible to keep my muzzle on target, drop a mag, and insert a new one without any of this business about changing grip/hold and pointing the gun off to the side.

In the world of guns, there are many features that produce changes that are not clear cut, but matters of degree. Grips are a good example, night sights, sight radius, magazine type, ammo, etc. I would NOT buy a set of thin grips only for the idea of concealment. However, their benefits go way beyond concealment. I have them on all my .45s.
 

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Hi,
I have the physical size to conceal a Desert Eagle .50, but I think my .45 Degree tilt to the right might give me away.....I could always compensate by hanging 2 extra mags off the left side....I wonder how long it would be before my knees gave out...
 

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I just put on a pair of Ultra-Thin grips on my Defender and like the feel very much. As far as being easier to conceal, I can`t tell much difference since the main problem with 1911 concealability isn`t the size of the grips but the "butt" of the gun / mainspring housing sticking out.
While it isn`t quite a "drop-in" change and the bushings will have to be changed out, I found it no real problem. Damn things are in there tight though. I literally had to use vise-grips to take them out since the bushings deformed while using a screwdriver.
Haven`t yet had an opportunity to shoot it but when I do I`ll post and let you know what difference, if any, they made.
 

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I put a pair of thin MacCormacks on my Officers Model and couldn't stand them. I have medium size hands but get a much better grip and better control with fat or standard size grips. I ended up putting a pair of Stag Grips on, which are a little on the fat side but feel great. For my hands "fat is where it's at".

MadDog
 

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I like the feel of thin grips. While not a big deal, every little bit of size reduction helps in concealment. IMHO, the flatter the better. Watch-Six

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They help a little on concealment, but for me it's not noticeable. Weird though. I've never liked 1911 single stacks. Shot a S&W 745 for my 45 for the longest because I hated the way a 1911 felt (I have moderately large hands). Then started shooting Para's 'cause they felt REAL good in my hand...just broke all the time. Then I shot a friends Thunder Ranch Special with the thin grips, and for some reason, it felt great in my hand. Well, my wife is the best woman in the world, and she got me one for Christmas last year. Saving up for another one now. Also put skinny's on my Kimber for my backup (don't trust the Para's anymore, they're locked in the safe for the kids now).
 

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I have a pair of Navidrex thin micarta grips on my Defender. I like them.
I am a big guy (6', 210#) with big hands, and I like the feel of the grip. They seem to help concealment by a little bit.
They look good too.

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I put thin smooth rosewood grips on my Ultra CDP and I think they offer a noticable improvement in concealability. They definitely change the feel of the gun, and although I can't say I *prefer* it, I don't mind it, and the other benefits make it a no-brainer to me.
 

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You don't need to be able to reach the slide stop with your right thumb. "Smooth" grips are better for me while carrying. They don't snag anything or hang on anything. Thin is a matter of preference. Some like them, some don't. The "feel" of a pistol can only be determined by the one who's handling it. If you don't know the terminology for all the parts and/or the way the thing "feels" just use common terms and try to get together with someone that you can communicate your feelings to about how the pistol feels in "your" hands. There are many, many different ways to change the "feel" of a pistol. Don't worry too much until you've shot several hundred rounds with the new pistol and received some good instruction from a more experienced shooter. You may be able to "fix" everything by having another shooter help you get started or to change if you've already ingrained some bad habits that need to be addressed. Take your time and have some fun. If you do decide you need some new stocks look around under the "links" section in this forum. You'll see thousands made from all sorts of materials in all shapes and sizes. YOU ARE THE ONE THAT HAS TO USE THEM... Good Luck...


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I am a big guy with large hands, and I like the feel of slim grips.

And a regular CCW carrier, I find the thin grips essential to reduce printing and to make the gun more comfortable to sit against if I wear in toward the rear on my belt. The thin grips allow the gun to tuck tighter to my body, and they reduce a significant amount of width off the handle, which is the toughest part to conceal, especially in light summer shirts.

So my vote is that, even for a big guy with big hands, the slim grips feel great and definitely aid in concealment.
 

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I like thin grips panels because they improve the natural pointing qualities of the pitol.
 
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