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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just got back from vaction in Ireland. Great fishing, golf, beer, bacon - but no 1911's. Had a major case of withdrawl. Good to be home.

But I digress, I'm trying to identify a number appearing just below the ser. # 91xxx on my 1911 Government Model. The stamping "E 24" is much larger and cruder than the ser. #. Is this an arsenal/armorer's mark?

The rest of the gun appears to be correct - except for the barrel which has only a "P" where it should be, but no H visible (and no other markings on the rest of the barrel at all).

Finish is about 70% on the frame and a bit less on the slide. Grips are worn.

Any info would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks & regards,


Roger D.
 

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Although they weren't supposed to, some units did mark their 1911s. That could be the reason for the number, as there is no other reason why it would be there.

As for the barrel, you didn't say whether your pistol is a Colt or a Remington-UMC. If it's the latter then the barrel is correct. If it's a Colt then the correct barrel would have an H and a P with the legs perpendicular to the axis of the bore.

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D. Kamm
USGI M1911/M1911A1 Pistols Website
http://www.geocities.com/M1911_M1911A1

Edited 'cuz I can't spell worth $#it.


[This message has been edited by dsk (edited 09-05-2001).]
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
dsk - you spend waaaay to much time assisting the lost (or yet to be found). As always, THANKS!

Pistol is a Colt. Although th barrel lacks the inspector's "H" stamp, everything else appears to be original, including the finish.

I can't imagine it would have been unusual for the barrel to be replaced on a pistol spending decades banging around the Service (maybe in E 24 - whatever Unit that may have been). I'm sure there are lots of GI parts guns out there and this is most certainly one of them.

All this makes chasing these things very interesting.

After cleaning, checking the gun over and replacing all the springs, I'm going to put a box of mild ball through it, store it away and get on to the next one.

Regards,

Roger D.

[This message has been edited by Roger D (edited 09-05-2001).]
 

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The barrels in early GI guns had a hard life. Before WW2 most ammo was corrosive, and even during WW2 the stuff was still mildly so. That is why it is so hard to find WW1-vintage barrels in good shape, and why most old 1911s kicking around have replaced barrels. That barrel might have been replaced while in the military as an armorer grabbed whatever he had on hand. Either that, or else maybe a previous civilian owner visited gun shows looking for "an old GI barrel" in good shape to put back in the gun for restoration purposes. Most folks wouldn't have a clue what's historically correct for their gun.

Speaking of replaced barrels, I've been needing to replace the shot-out old HS barrel in my 1945 Remington Rand for some time now. I bought a new GI chrome-lined barrel recently, but I could never bring myself to use it in anything. Finally I dropped it in the RR and went to the range to see what would happen. Well, the old warhorse now shoots like a new gun! Now's to keep telling myself it's okay to have a replacement barrel in one of my GI guns. I think the others in the safe might hiss and spit at it for awhile, but they'll get used to it I hope.


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D. Kamm
USGI M1911/M1911A1 Pistols Website
http://www.geocities.com/M1911_M1911A1
 
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