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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Taurus PT-1911 ... stopped counting usage after 3,000 trouble-free .45 ACP rounds (99% handloads).

But yesterday at the range after about 60 rounds, the slide unexpectedly locked back AFTER chambering a fresh round (the last / 8th round of the Wilson Combat 47D mag).

Couldn't slingshot the slide or use the slide release to close the slide. Had to remove the magazine first and then was able to close the slide. (Afterthought, I should have removed the round and put it back in the mag rather than closing the slide on a chambered round. Nuts.)

The chambered round then fired normally as did another 5-6 magazines.

I haven't cleaned the pistol yet. Anything I should be looking for in particular ... worn springs? (the gun has the original springs.).

Thanks for any insights. Never experienced this in any gun.
 

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I'm confused as to how a round was chambered and then the slide went rearward again to lock back. Am I just not reading the post correctly?
 

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Sounds like the round was stripped from the mag during recoil from inertia and went in the chamber, sounds odd but it does happen. Were you limp wristing or do you have weak mag springs? Someone posted a pic of this happening a month or two ago.

Greg
 

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Wow, I hadn't considered that and would've thought it a million to one chance of actually being chambered. I learn something new all the time. :eek:
 

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This to me us a sign of weak mag springs and maybe extractor is not letting the round under it easily enough. Mag springs would be a good first guess. mag spring issues can be made worse by a slide running too fast. The slide goes to fast when the recoil spring is wore out. Btw... This usually shows itself as the live round ending up stove pipe jammed.
IMO, I would:
mag springs first. Free from Wilson
recoil spring second. About $10

Are there any other contributing factors like:
high pressure ammo
owner smithing
gun smithing

in play here?
 

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...... the slide unexpectedly locked back AFTER chambering a fresh round (the last / 8th round of the Wilson Combat 47D mag).
Still doesn't compute, for me. OP says the slide locked back AFTER chambering a round. This means to me the slide went forward normally, chambering a round, and then of it's own accord, projected itself rearward to slide lock. OP didn't say the slide stayed locked open and a round was chambered.
 

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i think they are saying that the last round was inertial fed, leaving the magazine due to the reaward movement of the gun.

this would leave the mag empty when the slide was about return to battery, locking it open.

 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Folks, thanks so much for the help.

I'd never heard of an inertial feed before, but that must have been what actually happened. I had "assumed" the slide had first chambered a fresh round and then locked back (which baffled me) because in my experieince (10K rounds in various autos) that's the only way a fresh round ever got to the chamber! Instead, an inertial feed would perfectly describe what must have actually happened.

I'll field strip the pistol later today and report any findings.

In the meantime, the mag is a new one (although I guess you could still have an out-of-spec weak spring), but a worn recoil spring could be due for replacement.

Additional info: no previous owner or other gunsmithing; no hot ammo.
 

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Yes, after 3K rounds the recoil spring should be replaced. They can go longer, but some are just barely strong enough to start with and go bad earlier. I like the Wolff 'variable rate' springs in the standard strength.

'I haven't cleaned the pistol yet.'

Do you mean since new??? Hopefully you mean since the latest firing. Do your mags have the 'dimple' in the follower or other means to hold the last round back? If not, a very slightly weak spring could certainly have this effect particularly along with a weak recoil spring.
You can't 'slingshot' with an empty mag locked in, but the slide release should have worked. Check this out with the cleared pistol and the same mag to see if the empty mag is preventing the stop from releasing. Remove the recoil spring to make it easy. While looking into the ejection port with the slide locked back, push down the follower to see where the mag body edge is in relation to the stop. Push the stop down to see if it hits the magazine body before clearing the slide. If it sits too high, it won't let the stop release drop far enough. If this happens with just one mag, you can probably lower that edge and take care of it, but you'd also need to make sure the locking slot in the mag isn't holding the mag too high - check for wear on the feed lips and corresponding marks on the breech bolt bottom. Just random thoughts, because I've never seen or heard of a mag doing this, but I guess it's possible.
 

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Not all 1911's like the Wilson 47D, (no dimple, weak mag spring due to 8th round) some function better with these mags than others.

Try different mags and see if you can get this to happen again.
 

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Yeah. I saw that picture of the inertial-feed. Dang. Never even heard of it before Log Man posted it. He is the shizz. Hope he's not gone too long.

His #3K post is the latest one I've seen.

Hope he's just enjoying a well-earned vacation.

BigJon,I used to put a drop of oil in my magazine/springs/follower. Not a good idea,I take it?
Just clean and re-insert,yes?
Is your signature-line something about the window on the short-bus?
 

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The mags shouldn't be oiled for two reasons - possibility of oil getting on the ammunition and also possibly causing the top of the mag to fail because the feed lips depend on friction to help resist the push of the spring behind the round ammo cases. Oil on the cartridge does the same thing in the chamber, as the chamber depends on friction to help hold the case in. With less friction, it acts the same as increased pressure. Certain olis can also seep into the primers and cause misfires. I'm another one who has always used a light coat of oil in my magazines for smooth function and corrosion protection, but it's best to just keep them clean.
 

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I use a very light coat of oil in my mags. And I drop them in Arizona sand.
And my guns work well.
:confused:
 
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