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Discussion Starter #1
Any advantages with one over the other?

It seems that some of us have different opinions on these two set ups and I'm curious as to the benefits to each.

With the bull barrel, one less part to wear out, possibly extra weight up front for recoil control?

Any accuracy issues between the two?
 

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Main advantage of the bull barrel is less muzzle jump. Speeds up your shot-over-shot recovery time a smidgen, and makes the recoil of the gun feel softer. The extra mass can also delay unlocking a smidgen, but that's really a non-issue with a low pressure cartridge like .45 ACP. And there is no bushing to break, which does happen every once in a blue moon.

Downsides? Bull barrels usually cost a bit more. They aren't legal for IDPA competition. Field stripping a gun with a bull barrel isn't as simple. And they add a couple of ounces of weight.

Accuracy-wise, there is no difference. Since it would heat up more slowly and be more rigid, a bull barrel might have a theoretical edge in accuracy, or maybe not, but as a practical matter nobody can tell the difference as far as a 5" 1911 is concerned. Judging from the Scuemann Ultimatch AET in one of my guns, bull barrels sure as hell aren't less accurate than standard bushing barrels... that thing is the most accurate barrel I've ever seen in anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
CB,

So it may be a desireable feature depending on the application-no IDPA. From some of the points you brought up, it may also more reliable-one less part to fail.
 

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CYA - It's a great question, and one I've been thinking about for a long time. So far I've had three pistols with bull barrels in them and they were all very accurate.

I've been on the fence about sending my CQB to Wilsons and having them install a bull barrel on it. I personally don't think it's that much harder to field strip. The one disadvantage of a bull barrel (that I've heard of) is that the metal against metal fit will ulitimatly cause wear between the barrel and slide. This would of course affect accuracy at some point in time.

The argument for the bushing would suggest that parts do wear out eventually and a bushing is easier and less costly than a barrel or slide. I think you would have to do a heck of a lot of shooting to get to that point though.
 

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CYA:
Don't let those little voices on your shoulders decide for you...simply get both! I have ordered them that way before (in the 5" slide). This gives you the ability to swap the barrels at your leisure. Adds around a couple hundred the bottom line, but...you get two barrel systems.
 

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CYA
I have 6 STI’s & 1 Springfield with bull barrels. A bull barrel wearing out a slide at the front lock up! I feel that the barrel wears more, a slide should be able to take 3 or more re barreling’s with a bull before any wear would be noticeable. One of my STI’ s has 200,000 rounds through it, sure it is a 9mm but their is no sign of it loosing any accuracy yet . A .40 cal STI I use for IPSC/USPSA is on its second bull barrel the first one I was unsure of being able to install it my self having only done bushing types up to then, the machinist over did the turning down in the front lock up resulting in only 75,00 rounds fired before the accuracy went south. The replacement I installed is tighter at 50,000 than the other one was in the beginning. IMO the accuracy potential of the bull is greater than a bushing and the life of that accuracy is grater in the bull. Both must be installed properly to start with and when the accuracy starts to drop of who knows or cares if it is lock up or bore erosion , it needs to be re-barreled. Yes the bull is superior/ softer in recoil control .
out.
2011BLDR
 

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BULL! =)
 

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Joshua
Is “ BULL=)” supposed to mean I am full of it? This is simple math for a real shooter:
Tuesday Match = 150 Rounds
Weekly Practice = 300- 500 Rounds
Saturday Match = 200-300 Rounds
X 52 weeks = Low total-33,800 High total=49,400 per year
Add 48 Classes taught for work @ 400 rounds ( of pistol ) a class = 19,200 per year
seems the total would be close to 68,600 a year.
out,
2011BLDR
 

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No, I was just voting for the bull barrel type. Not refering to your total rounds expended a year. Sorry for the confusion. josh
 
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