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Can someone please explain to me what is meant by "barrel lock-up". When someone says "barrel lock-up is good", what exactly does that mean.
I have an idea what it means, but I just wanted to verify it with you board members. I think it means the amount of movement the barrel has when the slide is fully locked back.
If this is the case, how much would be excessive? What would "good barrel lock-up" be?

Greg
 

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Barrel locks up at the upper lugs to slide,lower lugs or feet to slide-stop pin,and at the bushing to barrel and slide.Ideally you want no movement ( up down or side to side) at any of these places in battery or lockup.The barrel hood should also have a good fit to the slide and hopefully the barrel returns to the exact place every cycle of the slide.All good it should be accurate.
 

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Technically, it refers only to the engagement of the barrel locking lugs with the mating lug seats in the slide. This lockup is made when the bottom lug rides up on the slide stop pin, so that engagement must be correct also. The idea is to have the maximum lockup without affecting the functioning of the gun.

Jim
 

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The 1911 is a locked breech, short recoil weapon. This means the barrel is locked together with the slide (which containes the breech) at the time of firing. They stay locked together for a short distance as the slide starts to move back. After this short distance the barrel unlocks by dropping down. This causes the lugs on the top of the barrel to drop down out of the lugs cut into the inside top of the slide. After that the slide continues on it's merry way to the rear, pulling out the empty case.
 

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The lower lugs do not ride hard on the slide stop, except in pistols with fitted barrels or proprietary, tightly-toleranced dimensions. The original M1911 essentially has the barrel "floating" between the slide and the slide stop pin; that's why fitting factory barrels consists of welding the lower lugs, and installing longer links - .015" or more longer - so there is a hard fit of the barrel between the slide and the slide stop.
 

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You are so right Rick B. In most production guns, the lugs (feet)do not contact the slide stop pin. That is why using a heavy return spring has no effect on this area. The most important parts of the lock-up are no motion when locked up, and consistency from one cycle to the next. All else is propaganda.
 
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